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I am trying to retrieve the environment variable to detect whether the system is 32 or 64 bit. But on 64 bit server the environment variable %processor_architecture% is returning x86 instead of AMD64.

Does anyone has any clue about this?

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2  
bash tag? I'm assuming this is just for windows. What version are you running? –  Dan McGrath Nov 15 '09 at 22:09
    
Guys i think it was the problem that MCG and bobince suggested. –  alice7 Nov 15 '09 at 22:44

7 Answers 7

up vote 30 down vote accepted

You may be getting the wrong environment variable. If your application is a 32-bit application running on a 64-bit OS the process version of this environment variable will return x86. If you want to find the architecture of the machine, you can grab it from the following registry entry:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Environment\PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE

Or if you're using .NET, then you can use this call to get it:

string arch = System.Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE", 
  EnvironmentVariableTarget.Machine);

From the command line you can try this:

reg query "HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Environment" /v PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE
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I just tried this and it is working. Thanks so much for your help. –  alice7 Nov 15 '09 at 22:34
3  
Thankyou. I just ran into this problem. MS - what a bunch of brain surgeons. A variable which tells you the target platform of the currently executing binary. Fish, bicycle, usefulness of to, etbloodycetra. –  user82238 Mar 25 '11 at 20:30

You can also get this from an environment variable, PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432. See this article for more info.

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More information about the same stuff: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa384274(VS.85).aspx –  jturcotte Jul 15 '10 at 12:06

Are you actually running a 64-bit version of Windows? If you are running 32-bit Windows on a 64-bit-capable CPU, you will still get x86.

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I am actually running 64 bit version. I can see that from the My COmputer properties. –  alice7 Nov 15 '09 at 22:11

AMD64 is a brand of CPU which is based on the x86 architecture. x86-64 more precisely, which is the 64-bit extension of x86.

This also relates to bobince's answer.

This Knowledge Base article shows you how to determine if your system is 32-bit or 64-bit

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So Is there anyway to find out whether the system is 64 or 32 using batch file. –  alice7 Nov 15 '09 at 22:05
2  
Yes. Read here support.microsoft.com/kb/556009 –  Dan McGrath Nov 15 '09 at 22:14
    
This really helps. –  alice7 Nov 15 '09 at 22:34

%processor_architecture% returns x86 only when you execute the batch script (cmd.exe as its interpreter) from a 32-bit program.

I just faced the same issue while executing the batch from 32-bit Total Commander. When Executing it from 64-bit Explorer, %processor_architecture% returns correctly AMD64.

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I think part of the reason it is like this way is that the x86-64 architecture has to allow 32-bit programs to treat it as identical (as far as possible) to a 32-bit environment and make sure that 32-bit programs do not think it is 64-bit only (like the Itanium architecture).

This however makes it very frustrating to people who need to access the differences between the x86-64 architecture vs 32 bit architecture on Windows.

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I found on my Win7HB x64 system:

msgbox wscript.createobject("wscript.shell").environment("system").item("processor_architecture") ' always "AMD64"

msgbox wscript.createobject("wscript.shell").environment("process").item("processor_architecture") ' "AMD64" if launched via System32, "x86" if launched via SysWOW64
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