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Update - solved

The final solution differs a bit from Brandon's suggestion but his answer brought me on the right track.

class State
{
  public int Offset { get; set; }
  public HashSet<string> UniqueImageUrls = new HashSet<string>();
}

public IObservable<TPicture> GetPictures(ref object _state)
{
  var localState = (State) _state ?? new State();
  _state = localState;

  return Observable.Defer(()=>
  {
    return Observable.Defer(() => Observable.Return(GetPage(localState.Offset)))
      .SubscribeOn(TaskPoolScheduler.Default)
      .Do(x=> localState.Offset += 20)
      .Repeat()
      .TakeWhile(x=> x.Count > 0)
      .SelectMany(x=> x)
      .Where(x=> !localState.UniqueImageUrls.Contains(x.ImageUrl))
      .Do(x=> localState.UniqueImageUrls.Add(x.ImageUrl));
  });
}

IList<TPicture> GetPage(int offset)
{
  ... 
  return result;
}

Original Question

I'm currently struggling with the following problem. The PictureProvider implementation shown below is working with an offset variable used for paging results of a backend service providing the actual data. What I would like to implement is an elegant solution making the current offset available to the consumer of the observable to allow for resuming the observable sequence at a later time at the correct offset. Resuming is already accounted for by the intialState argument to GetPictures().

Recommendations for improving the code in a more RX like fashion would be welcome as well. I'm actually not so sure if the Task.Run() stuff is appropriate here.

  public class PictureProvider :
    IPictureProvider<Picture>
  {
    #region IPictureProvider implementation

    public IObservable<Picture> GetPictures(object initialState)
    {
      return Observable.Create<Picture>((IObserver<Picture> observer) =>
      {
        var state = new ProducerState(initialState);
        ProducePictures(observer, state);
        return state;
      });
    }

    #endregion

    void ProducePictures(IObserver<Picture> observer, ProducerState state)
    {
      Task.Run(() =>
      {
        try
        {
          while(!state.Terminate.WaitOne(0))
          {
            var page = GetPage(state.Offset);

            if(page.Count == 0)
            {
              observer.OnCompleted();
              break;
            }

            else
            {
              foreach(var picture in page)
                observer.OnNext(picture);


              state.Offset += page.Count;
            }
          }
        }

        catch (Exception ex)
        {
          observer.OnError(ex);
        }

        state.TerminateAck.Set();
      });
    }

    IList<Picture> GetPage(int offset)
    {
      var result = new List<Picture>();

      ... boring web service call here

      return result;
    }

    public class ProducerState :
      IDisposable
    {
      public ProducerState(object initialState)
      {
        Terminate = new ManualResetEvent(false);
        TerminateAck = new ManualResetEvent(false);

        if(initialState != null)
          Offset = (int) initialState;
      }

      public ManualResetEvent Terminate { get; private set; }
      public ManualResetEvent TerminateAck { get; private set; }

      public int Offset { get; set; }

      #region IDisposable implementation

      public void Dispose()
      {
        Terminate.Set();
        TerminateAck.WaitOne();

        Terminate.Dispose();
        TerminateAck.Dispose();
      }

      #endregion
    }
  }
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I suggest refactoring your interface to yield the state as part of the data. Now the client has what they need to resubscribe where they left off.

Also, once you start using Rx, you should find that using synchronization primitives like ManualResetEvent are rarely necessary. If you refactor your code so that retrieving each page is its own Task, then you can eliminate all of that synchronization code.

Also, if you are calling a "boring web service" in GetPage, then just make it async. This gets rid of the need to call Task.Run among other benefits.

Here is a refactored version, using .NET 4.5 async/await syntax. It could also be done without async/await. I also added a GetPageAsync method that uses Observable.Run just in case you really cannot convert your webservice call to be asynchronous

/// <summary>A set of pictures</summary>
public struct PictureSet
{
    public int Offset { get; private set; }
    public IList<Picture> Pictures { get; private set; }

    /// <summary>Clients will use this property if they want to pick up where they left off</summary>
    public int NextOffset { get { return Offset + Pictures.Count; } }
    public PictureSet(int offset, IList<Picture> pictures)
        :this() { Offset = offset; Pictures = pictures; }
}

public class PictureProvider : IPictureProvider<PictureSet>
{
    public IObservable<PictureSet> GetPictures(int offset = 0)
    {
        // use Defer() so we can capture a copy of offset
        // for each observer that subscribes (so multiple
        // observers do not update each other's offset
        return Observable.Defer<PictureSet>(() =>
        {
            var localOffset = offset;
            // Use Defer so we re-execute GetPageAsync()
            // each time through the loop.
            // Update localOffset after each GetPageAsync()
            // completes so that the next call to GetPageAsync()
            // uses the next offset
            return Observable.Defer(() => GetPageAsync(localOffset))
                .Select(pictures =>
                    {
                        var s = new PictureSet(localOffset, pictures);
                        localOffset += pictures.Count;
                    })
                .Repeat()
                .TakeWhile(pictureSet => pictureSet.Pictures.Count > 0);
        });
    }

    private async Task<IList<Picture>> GetPageAsync(int offset)
    {
        var data = await BoringWebServiceCallAsync(offset);
        result = data.Pictures.ToList();
    }

    // this version uses Observable.Run() (which just uses Task.Run under the hood)
    // in case you cannot convert your
    // web service call to be asynchronous
    private IObservable<IList<Picture>> GetPageAsync(int offset)
    {
        return Observable.Run(() =>
        {
            var result = new List<Picture>();
            ... boring web service call here
            return result;
        });
    }
}

Clients just need to add a SelectMany call to get their IObservable<Picture>. They can choose to store the pictureSet.NextOffset if they wish.

pictureProvider
    .GetPictures()
    .SelectMany(pictureSet => pictureSet.Pictures)
    .Subscribe(picture => whatever);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the thorough example. I initially thought about passing the current state along with the real data to the subscriber but disregarded enriching the observable sequence with metadata as a hack :-) –  Oliver Weichhold Jul 1 '13 at 6:25
    
If the client needs the metadata, then it is not a hack to provide it. And providing it with the data is the only way to ensure timing consistency between the metadata and the data. Keep in mind the consuming client could have multiple layers. Maybe a lower layer consumes the metadata and only passes IObservable<Picture> to the higher layer (by using SelectMany to strip out the metadata). This is a typical envelope wrapping messaging design pattern. –  Brandon Jul 1 '13 at 14:09
    
I've updated the question with the solution I've ended up. I chose to have the client provide a storage location for the sequence state. –  Oliver Weichhold Jul 1 '13 at 15:29

Instead of thinking about how to save the subscription state, I would think about how to replay the state of the inputs (i.e. I'd try to create a serializable ReplaySubject that, on resume, would just resubscribe and catch back up to the current state).

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