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How do I static_assert like this? Maybe Boost supports it if not C++ or new features in C++11?

template<T>
struct foo {};

template<FooType>
struct bar {
  static_assert(FooType is indeed foo<T> for some T,"failure"); //how?
};
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I'm pretty sure there is another SO question on this somewhere. Finding it may be tricky. –  Mankarse Jun 30 '13 at 13:06
    
A related question can be found here –  Tom Knapen Jun 30 '13 at 13:19
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2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You could do something along these lines. Given a trait that can verify whether a class is an instantiation of a class template:

#include <type_traits>

template<typename T, template<typename> class TT>
struct is_instantiation_of : std::false_type { };

template<typename T, template<typename> class TT>
struct is_instantiation_of<TT<T>, TT> : std::true_type { };

Use it as follows in your program:

template<typename T>
struct foo {};

template<typename FooType>
struct bar {
  static_assert(is_instantiation_of<FooType, foo>::value, "failure");
};

int main()
{
    bar<int> b; // ERROR!
    bar<foo<int>> b; // OK!
}

If you want, you could generalize this to detect whether a class is an instance of a template with any number of (type) parameters, like so:

#include <type_traits>

template<template<typename...> class TT, typename T>
struct is_instantiation_of : std::false_type { };

template<template<typename...> class TT, typename... Ts>
struct is_instantiation_of<TT, TT<Ts...>> : std::true_type { };

template<typename FooType>
struct bar {
  static_assert(is_instantiation_of<foo, FooType>::value, "failure");
};

You would then use it this way in your program:

template<typename FooType>
struct bar {
  static_assert(is_instantiation_of<foo, FooType>::value, "failure");
};

int main()
{
    bar<int> b; // ERROR!
    bar<foo<int>> b; // OK!
}

Here is a live example.

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Do you (or others here) think that the knowledge from reading the book "C++ Templates: The Complete Guide" by Vandevoorde and Josuttis would have allowed me to do this on my own? –  roger.james Jun 30 '13 at 13:24
    
Hmm, probably not, since std::true_type is a C++11 feature :( There don't seem to be any new template books around for C++11. –  roger.james Jun 30 '13 at 13:24
1  
@roger.james: That is a good book and I advise reading it anyway. However, as you mentioned, in this answer I used C++11 features that are not presented in that book (especially variadic templates). –  Andy Prowl Jun 30 '13 at 13:28
    
Is it possible to generalize it even further to make type aliases succeed? Example of how it currently fails: gist.github.com/anonymous/d318fcac90651bcffa5e –  roger.james Jun 30 '13 at 15:38
    
There are two options here: 1) All aliases are equivalent to each other. 2) If the original uses foo_alt, only foo_alt (and not foo) will succeed in the static_assert, and vice versa. Can both versions be accomplished? –  roger.james Jun 30 '13 at 15:41
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As someone else wrote,

template<typename T, template<typename...> class TT>
struct is_specialization_of : std::false_type { };

template<template<typename...> class TT, typename... Ts>
struct is_specialization_of<TT<Ts...>, TT> : std::true_type { };

However, beware that this works only for template classes whose template parameters are all typenames! Presented with

typedef std::array<int, 42> MyArray;
static_assert(is_specialization_of<MyArray, std::array>::value, "");

it will simply fail to compile at all.

I believe C++11 has no way to deal with this limitation. C++14 might have something planned. If anyone knows for sure, feel free to update this answer.

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