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how can this result of loess fit using loess be reproduced with lowess?

loess code:

> data = data.frame(x=c(1,0.5,3,4,5,5.5,6,7), y=c(10, 25, 38, 44.5, 500, 550, 600, 705))
> fit = loess("y ~ x", data=data)
> new_y = predict(fit, data$x)
> new_y
[1]   6.251022  28.272100  -2.840750 150.006042 481.927307 563.161187 640.825415 693.166150

lowess code:

> new_fit = lowess(data, f=0.8)
> new_fit
$x
[1] 0.5 1.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 5.5 6.0 7.0

$y
[1]  -4.330119  38.931265 255.000000 400.000000 500.000000 550.241949 601.519903 704.247275

The results are very different. I am trying to get new fitted values for y given values of x. loess gives

[1]   6.251022  28.272100  -2.840750 150.006042 481.927307 563.161187 640.825415 693.166150

While lowess gives:

[1]  -4.330119  38.931265 255.000000 400.000000 500.000000 550.241949 601.519903 704.247275

How can I rewrite my lowess call to give very similar results for new y values as predict with loess fit and x values? thanks.

share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by 42-, zmo, Undo, Mihai Maruseac, SysDragon Jul 1 '13 at 5:20

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
The same? Unreasonable request? I'm not the close-voter but I do understand the impulse. – 42- Jun 30 '13 at 23:04
    
@Dwin: obviously, when I say same, I mean similar. -2.8 and 255 are not similar. – user248237dfsf Jul 1 '13 at 0:35
    
I do think it unreasonable to expect two different nonparametric smoothers to produce "the same result" at all points from a tiny dataset that has greater then two log10's of range. They pick a different "shift point" and picking shift points is notoriously difficult. – 42- Jul 1 '13 at 16:53
    
There are some information here: stat.ethz.ch/pipermail/bioconductor/2003-September/002337.html – Robert Kubrick Oct 22 '14 at 17:10

Why do you need this?

I don't think it can be done in the general case. Here is a specific case, which gives almost identical results, but the last value is still different for some reason:

fit1 <- loess(y~x,data=data,span=0.8,degree=1)
predict(fit1)
#[1]  19.08622  12.55692  37.93642 188.35019 401.53528 506.87040 591.41854 740.71060

fit2 <- lowess(data$x,data$y,f=0.8,iter=0)
fit2

# $x
# [1] 0.5 1.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 5.5 6.0 7.0
# 
# $y
# [1]  12.55692  19.08622  37.93642 188.35019 401.53528 506.87040 591.41854 741.12187
#Note that lowess reorders by x.
share|improve this answer
    
But how can you make it similar to the default features of loess? I want to do this since lowess is faster and I'm not using the equation features of loess, just a simple y~x – user248237dfsf Jun 30 '13 at 18:52
    
Maybe instead of demanding equality you should explain what "features" of loess that you prefer. – 42- Jun 30 '13 at 23:19
    
@DWin: loess worked on my data. So I just want that functionality but faster. It's not unreasonable to assume they should give similar answers... it's confusing that the defaults are wildly different – user248237dfsf Jul 1 '13 at 0:34

Apparently the reason it cannot be done is that the two functions use distinct algorithms under the hood, and the only explanation of that I could find is by Brian Ripley on here:

http://www.mail-archive.com/r-help@stat.math.ethz.ch/msg63623.html

"It is not possible: the algorithms differ considerably in their details. 

...

In determining 'local' loess() uses a tricubic weighting, lowess() uses a 
uniform weighting (on reading the code)."

The documentation makes it clear how to choose the span/f parameters to be similar to the default, but all other parameters are not inter-translatable between the two functions because of the distinct smoothing algorithms used.

share|improve this answer
data = data.frame(x=c(1,0.5,3,4,5,5.5,6,7), y=c(10, 25, 38, 44.5, 500, 550, 600, 705))
 fit = loess("y ~ x", data=data)
 new_y = predict(fit, data$x)
 plot( data$x , new_y)
lines(lowess(data, f=0.8)$x, lowess(data, f=0.8)$y)
# Obviously lowess with f=0.8 is giving different smoothing

Compare to a lower f-value

lines(lowess(data, f=0.8)$x, lowess(data, f=0.5)$y, col="red") 

enter image description here

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