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Say i have a class shape and 2 derived classes circle and square. The code is:

Shape* s1 = new circle;

Now I want to asssigne s1 to square, while preserving the variables that are common to both.

Shape* s1 = new Square;

How do i do this?

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1  
What do you mean by "preserving the variables"? –  Vaughn Cato Jun 30 '13 at 16:02
1  
I think he means "members". It's not possible without using a conversion function. And why do you want to convert a circle to a square ? –  Pierre Fourgeaud Jun 30 '13 at 16:05
1  
You don't do that. "How" is irrelevant. –  n.m. Jun 30 '13 at 16:20
    
when is say preserve variables i mean like say shape has a protected variable "side" which is inherited. When i convert circle to square, square->size must be equal to what circle->size was. The circle, square thing is just a trivial example i'm using. I don't convert circles to squares :P EDIT: All variables in square and circle are inherited. They don't have unique variables –  rainman_s Jun 30 '13 at 16:20

2 Answers 2

By using a constructor that takes a reference to the base class, you can easily copy the common Shape data:

#include <assert.h>

enum class Color { red, green, blue };

class Shape {
  public:
    Shape() : color(red) { }
    void setColor(Color new_color) { color = new_color; }
    Color getColor() const { return color; }
  private:
    Color color;
};

class Square : public Shape {
  public:
    Square() { }
    // Using explicit constructor to help avoid accidentally
    // using the wrong type of shape.
    explicit Square(const Shape &that) : Shape(that) { }
};

class Circle : public Shape {
  public:
    Circle() { }
    explicit Circle(const Shape &that) : Shape(that) { }
};

int main(int,char**)
{
  Circle circle;
  circle.setColor(Color::blue);
  Square square(circle);
  assert(circle.getColor()==square.getColor());
}
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You can use your copy constructor :

Shape* s1 = new Circle;
Shape* s1 = new Square( s1 );

With :

class Square : public Shape
{
    ...
public:
    Square( const Circle& rhs )
    {
        // Copy the value you want to keep
        // Respect the rules of copy constructor implementation
    }
    // Even better :
    Square( const Shape& rhs )
    {
        ...
    }

    ...
};

Don't forget that converting a Circle into Square is a bit weird.

And there is a memory LEAK in your implementation. If you don't want to use you Circle, delete it.

This would be better :

Shape* s1 = new Circle;
Shape* s2 = new Square( s1 );

delete s1;

EDIT : Here is a link about copy constructor and assignement operator : http://www.cplusplus.com/articles/y8hv0pDG/

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