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I like to use collections.OrderedDict sometimes when I need an associative array where the order of the keys should be retained. Best example I have of this is in parsing or creating csv files, where it's useful to have the order of columns retained implicitly in the object.

But I'm worried that this is bad practice, since it seems to me that the whole concept of an associative array is that the order of the keys should never matter, and that any operations which rely on ordering should just use lists because that's why lists exist (this can be done for the csv example above). I don't have data on this, but I'm willing to bet that the performance for lists is universally better than OrderedDict.

So my question is: Are there any really compelling use cases for OrderedDict? Is the csv use case a good example of where it should be used or a bad one?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For your specific use case (writing csv files) an ordered dict is not necessary. Instead, use a DictWriter.

Personally I use OrderedDict when I need some LIFO/FIFO access, for which is even has a the popitem method. I honestly couldn't think of a good use case, but the one mentioned at PEP-0327 for attribute order is a good one:

XML/HTML processing libraries currently drop the ordering of attributes, use a list instead of a dict which makes filtering cumbersome, or implement their own ordered dictionary. This affects ElementTree, html5lib, Genshi and many more libraries.

If you are ever questioning why there is some feature in Python, the PEP is a good place to start because that's where the justification that leads to the inclusion of the feature is detailed.

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But I'm worried that this is bad practice, since it seems to me that the whole concept of an associative array is that the order of the keys should never matter,

Nonsense. That's not the "whole concept of an associative array". It's just that the order rarely matters and so we default to surrendering the order to get a conceptually simpler (and more efficient) data structure.

and that any operations which rely on ordering should just use lists because that's why lists exist

Stop it right there! Think a second. How would you use lists? As a list of (key, value) pairs, with unique keys, right? Well congratulations, my friend, you just re-invented OrderedDict, just with an awful API and really slow. Any conceptual objections to an ordered mapping would apply to this ad hoc data structure as well. Luckily, those objections are nonsense. Ordered mappings are perfectly fine, they're just different from unordered mappings. Giving it an aptly-named dedicated implementation with a good API and good performance improves people's code.

Aside from that: Lists are only one kind of ordered data structure. And while they are somewhat universal in that you can virtually all data structures out of some combination of lists (if you bend over backwards), that doesn't mean you should always use lists.

I don't have data on this, but I'm willing to bet that the performance for lists is universally better than OrderedDict.

Data (structures) doesn't (don't) have performance. Operations on data (structures) have. And thus it depends on what operations you're interested in. If you just need a list of pairs, a list is obviously correct, and iterating over it or indexing it is quite efficient. However, if you want a mapping that's also ordered, or even a tiny subset of mapping functionality (such as handling duplicate keys), then a list alone is pretty awful, as I already explained above.

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thanks for the tough love ;) this was useful. –  galarant Jun 30 '13 at 19:13

Probably a comment would suffice...

I think it would be questionable if you use it on places where you don't need it (where order is irrelevant and ordinary a dict would suffice). Otherwise the code will probably be simpler than using lists.

This is valid for any language construct/library - if it makes your code simpler, use the higher level abstraction/implementation.

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As long as you feel comfortable with this data structure, and that it fits your needs, why caring? Perhaps it is not the more efficient one (in term of speed, etc.), but, if it's there, it's obviously because it's useful in certain cases (or nobody would have thought of writing it).

You can basically use three types of associative arrays in Python:

  1. the classic hash table (no order at all)
  2. the OrderedDict (order which mirrors the way the object was created)
  3. and the binary trees - this is not in the standard lib -, which order their keys exactly as you want, in a custom order (not necessarily the alphabetical one).

So, in fact, the order of the keys can matter. Just choose the structure that you think is the more appropriate to do the job.

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Small point, Python has no arrays (in what you may be used to in other languages). –  Burhan Khalid Jul 1 '13 at 5:20
    
@BurhanKhalid: no arrays? Of what use is the built-in array type then, the one which is provided by numpy, and again the "bitarray" type available in an ancillary module on pypi? –  doukremt Jul 1 '13 at 10:48

For CSV and similar constructs of repeated keys use a namedtuple. It is best of both worlds.

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