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Here is a little script I wrote for making fractals using newton's method.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

f = np.poly1d([1,0,0,-1]) # x^3 - 1
fp = np.polyder(f)

def newton(i, guess):
    if abs(f(guess)) > .00001:
        return newton(i+1, guess - f(guess)/fp(guess))
    else:
        return i

pic = []
for y in np.linspace(-10,10, 1000):
    pic.append( [newton(0,x+y*1j) for x in np.linspace(-10,10,1000)] )

plt.imshow(pic)
plt.show()

I am using numpy arrays, but nonetheless loop through each element of 1000-by-1000 linspaces to apply the newton() function, which acts on a single guess and not a whole array.

My question is this: How can I alter my approach to better exploit the advantages of numpy arrays?

P.S.: If you want to try the code without waiting too long, better to use 100-by-100.

Extra background:
See Newton's Method for finding zeroes of a polynomial.
The basic idea for the fractal is to test guesses in the complex plane and count the number of iterations to converge to a zero. That's what the recursion is about in newton(), which ultimately returns the number of steps. A guess in the complex plane represents a pixel in the picture, colored by the number of steps to convergence. From a simple algorithm, you get these beautiful fractals.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I worked from Lauritz V. Thaulow's code and was able to get a pretty significant speed-up with the following code:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from itertools import count

def newton_fractal(xmin, xmax, ymin, ymax, xres, yres):
    yarr, xarr = np.meshgrid(np.linspace(xmin, xmax, xres), \
                             np.linspace(ymin, ymax, yres) * 1j)
    arr = yarr + xarr
    ydim, xdim = arr.shape
    arr = arr.flatten()
    f = np.poly1d([1,0,0,-1]) # x^3 - 1
    fp = np.polyder(f)
    counts = np.zeros(shape=arr.shape)
    unconverged = np.ones(shape=arr.shape, dtype=bool)
    indices = np.arange(len(arr))
    for i in count():
        f_g = f(arr[unconverged])
        new_unconverged = np.abs(f_g) > 0.00001
        counts[indices[unconverged][~new_unconverged]] = i
        if not np.any(new_unconverged):
            return counts.reshape((ydim, xdim))
        unconverged[unconverged] = new_unconverged
        arr[unconverged] -= f_g[new_unconverged] / fp(arr[unconverged])

N = 1000
pic = newton_fractal(-10, 10, -10, 10, N, N)

plt.imshow(pic)
plt.show()

For N=1000, I get a time of 11.1 seconds using Lauritz's code and a time of 1.7 seconds using this code.

There are two main speed-ups here. First, I used meshgrid to speed-up the creation of the numpy array of input values. This is actually a pretty significant part of the speed-up when N=1000.

The second speed-up comes from only doing calculations on the unconverged portions. Lauritz was using masked arrays for this before realizing that they were slowing things down. I haven't looked at them in quite some time, but I do remember masked arrays being a source of slowness in the past. I believe it is because they are largely implemented in pure Python over a numpy array rather than being written almost completely in C like numpy arrays.

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Thanks to both of you! –  mrKelley Jul 1 '13 at 5:39
    
Amazing. Thank you for teaching me lots of new tricks. +1! –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Jul 1 '13 at 12:46

Here's my stab at it. It is about 16 times faster.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from itertools import count

def newton_fractal(xmin, xmax, ymin, ymax, xres, yres):
    arr = np.array([[x + y * 1j for x in np.linspace(xmin, xmax, xres)] \
        for y in np.linspace(ymin, ymax, yres)], dtype="complex")
    f = np.poly1d([1,0,0,-1]) # x^3 - 1
    fp = np.polyder(f)
    counts = np.zeros(shape=arr.shape)
    for i in count():
        f_g = f(arr)
        converged = np.abs(f_g) <= 0.00001
        counts[np.where(np.logical_and(converged, counts == 0))] = i
        if np.all(converged):
            return counts
        arr -= f_g / fp(arr)

pic = newton_fractal(-10, 10, -10, 10, 100, 100)

plt.imshow(pic)
plt.show()

I'm not a numpy expert, I'm sure those that are can optimalize it some more, but already it's a huge improvement in terms of speed.

EDIT: It turned out the masked arrays didn't help at all, removing them resulted in a 15% speed increase, so I've removed the masked arrays from the above solution. Can anyone explain why the masked arrays didn't help?

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Thanks for this, I'm still reading and understanding your method. Why the masked array? –  mrKelley Jun 30 '13 at 20:08
1  
@mrKelley It's to avoid running any more computations on the elements that have converged. It should work the same but slower if you just use a regular array. –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Jun 30 '13 at 20:13
    
Ahh... that makes sense, very nice. –  mrKelley Jun 30 '13 at 20:14
    
@mrKelly It made sense in theory. In practice... not so much. See my edit. –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Jun 30 '13 at 20:34

I vectorized the newton function and got approx. 85 times faster with 200x200 points, 144 times faster with 500x500 points, and 148 times faster with 1000x1000 points:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

f = np.poly1d([1,0,0,-1]) # x^3 - 1
fp = np.polyder(f)
def newton(i, guess):            
    a = np.empty(guess.shape,dtype=int)
    a[:] = i
    j = np.abs(f(guess))>.00001
    if np.any(j):         
        a[j] = newton(i+1, guess[j] - np.divide(f(guess[j]),fp(guess[j])))        
    return a

npts = 1000
x = np.linspace(-10,10,npts)
y = np.linspace(-10,10,npts)
xx, yy = np.meshgrid(x, y)
pic = np.reshape(newton(0,np.ravel(xx+yy*1j)),[npts,npts])
plt.imshow(pic)
plt.show()
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