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I can get how long the server has been running through uptime, but is there any way to get the total amount of processor time spent on all processes combined?

I can do this on my Windows desktop by subtracting the System Idle Process time from the uptime, but is there any similar method in Linux?

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Yes, programmatically. –  Niet the Dark Absol Jun 30 '13 at 19:20
    
I'm confused. Are you answering your own question in the comments? –  coder543 Jun 30 '13 at 19:28
    
The question I was answering there was deleted, for some reason. –  Niet the Dark Absol Jun 30 '13 at 19:30
    
@coder543 I was commenting that "Programmatically? Else it sounds off-topic." But since my assertion was wrong, I've removed my comment. –  user529758 Jun 30 '13 at 19:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Look into the /proc/stat file. It should contain the idle CPU numbers you're looking for, so with a little math you'll be able to calculate how long the CPU has been idle.

EDIT: Also, here's an example of how to get the percentage from any Linux terminal:

head -n 1 /proc/stat | awk '{ print "\n"; printf (($2+$3+$4+$7+$8+$9)/($2+$3+$4+$5+$6+$7+$8+$9))*100; print "% of the time since the computer was booted has been spent doing work." }'

I think I've got it handling all of the columns correctly there.

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So if I understand right, I take the sum of all columns except idle, divide by the sum of all columns (including idle), and I get the ratio of time spent working? –  Niet the Dark Absol Jun 30 '13 at 19:37
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Yes, except that you should bundle iowait in with idle, since iowait simply means "waiting on I/O" (and therefore not doing any work). –  coder543 Jun 30 '13 at 19:39
    
Gotcha, thank you! –  Niet the Dark Absol Jun 30 '13 at 19:40
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I added an example of how to do it from the Linux shell, the command runs off the edge of the box though, so make sure to copy it all. –  coder543 Jun 30 '13 at 19:49
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Thank you very much, this has been very helpful. I see the file also contains the boot time, so I can calculate the actual amount of time too. –  Niet the Dark Absol Jun 30 '13 at 20:18

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