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I need advice for micro optimization in C++ for a vector comparison function, it compares two vectors for equality and order of elements does not matter.

template <class T>
static bool compareVectors(const vector<T> &a, const vector<T> &b)
{
  int n = a.size();
  std::vector<bool> free(n, true);
  for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    bool matchFound = false;
    for (int j = 0; j < n; j++) {
      if (free[j] && a[i] == b[j]) {
        matchFound = true;
        free[j] = false;
        break;
      }
    }
    if (!matchFound) return false;
  }
  return true;
}

This function is used heavily and I am thinking of possible way to optimize it. Can you please give me some suggestions? By the way I use C++11.

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
There's huge potential if the size of input vectors is a compile time constant. Then, a bitset rather than a std::vector<bool> would be better. This can even be more efficient without compile time constant size of input. Other thought: Doesn't i <= j suffice, so that you can start your loop over j from i? –  stefan Jun 30 '13 at 19:44
4  
I totally don't understand what the purpose of your "free" vector is. A somewhat unrelated thought is that you might be able to make some efficiencies happen if the order of the arrays could be assured prior to entering this function. –  crowder Jun 30 '13 at 19:48
1  
@crowder If there are multiple elements in b which compare equal, you have to find one counterpart for each of those in a. The free vector stores whether one element in b has already been associated to an element in a. –  dyp Jun 30 '13 at 19:52
2  
@user2381422 I know you said the order of the elements doesn't matter, but is it possible to order/sort the elements? (I.e. are they comparable?) If so, you could easily go from O(n²) to O(n logn) –  i Code 4 Food Jun 30 '13 at 20:06
4  
No matter how you optimize it otherwise, adding if (a.size() != b.size()) return false; to the beginning will probably help if it is common that the size of the vectors don't match. –  wjl Jun 30 '13 at 20:08

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It just realized that this code only does kind of a "set equivalency" check (and now I see that you actually did say that, what a lousy reader I am!). This can be achieved much simpler

template <class T>
static bool compareVectors(vector<T> a, vector<T> b)
{
    std::sort(a.begin(), a.end());
    std::sort(b.begin(), b.end());
    return (a == b);
}

You'll need to include the header algorithm.

If your vectors are always of same size, you may want to add an assertion at the beginning of the method:

assert(a.size() == b.size());

This will be handy in debugging your program if you once perform this operation for unequal lengths by mistake.

Otherwise, the vectors can't be the same if they have unequal length, so just add

if ( a.size() != b.size() )
{
   return false;
}

before the sort instructions. This will safe you lot's of time.

The complexity of this technically is O(n*log(n)) because it's mainly dependent on the sorting which (usually) is of that complexity. This is better than your O(n^2) approach, but might be worse due to the needed copies. This is irrelevant if your original vectors may be sorted.


If you want to stick with your approach, but tweak it, here are my thoughts on this:

You can use std::find for this:

template <class T>
static bool compareVectors(const vector<T> &a, const vector<T> &b)
{
  const size_t n = a.size(); // make it const and unsigned!
  std::vector<bool> free(n, true);
  for ( size_t i = 0; i < n; ++i )
  {
      bool matchFound = false;
      auto start = b.cbegin();
      while ( true )
      {
          const auto position = std::find(start, b.cend(), a[i]);
          if ( position == b.cend() )
          {
              break; // nothing found
          }
          const auto index = position - b.cbegin();
          if ( free[index] )
          {
             // free pair found
             free[index] = false;
             matchFound = true;
             break;
          }
          else
          {
             start = position + 1; // search in the rest
          }
      }
      if ( !matchFound )
      {
         return false;
      }
   }
   return true;
}

Another possibility is replacing the structure to store free positions. You may try a std::bitset or just store the used indices in a vector and check if a match isn't in that index-vector. If the outcome of this function is very often the same (so either mostly true or mostly false) you can optimize your data structures to reflect that. E.g. I'd use the list of used indices if the outcome is usually false since only a handful of indices might needed to be stored.

This method has the same complexity as your approach. Using std::find to search for things is sometimes better than a manual search. (E.g. if the data is sorted and the compiler knows about it, this can be a binary search).

share|improve this answer
2  
To the downvoter, please leave a comment to give me the chance of improving this answer! –  stefan Jun 30 '13 at 20:09
3  
I'm not the down voter, but I can speculate on the reason for the down vote; I think it's unnecessary to keep the part before "I just realized that this code...". If you've realized that the first part of your answer is wrong or otherwise undesirable, why keep it and waste the time of future readers? –  enobayram Jun 30 '13 at 20:13
2  
For comparing two entire containers, == is preferred over std::equal. –  dyp Jun 30 '13 at 20:19
1  
I think the reason why == is preferred over std::equal is that == can be optimized for the specific container (the Standard library implementation most probably doesn't include a pointer to the container in the iterators). –  dyp Jun 30 '13 at 20:25
5  
A micro-optimization on the first solution would be to implement an own sorting algorithm (e.g. quicksort) for the second vector, where you can use pivots from the first, already sorted vector. They should be optimal pivots if both are equal, and if they're not optimal (divide 50/50), the vectors are different (stop sorting). –  dyp Jun 30 '13 at 20:47

Your can probabilistically compare two unsorted vectors (u,v) in O(n):

Calculate:

U= xor(h(u[0]), h(u[1]), ..., h(u[n-1]))
V= xor(h(v[0]), h(v[1]), ..., h(v[n-1]))

If U==V then the vectors are probably equal.

h(x) is any non-cryptographic hash function - such as MurmurHash. (Cryptographic functions would work as well but would usually be slower).

(This would work even without hashing, but it would be much less robust when the values have a relatively small range).

A 128-bit hash function would be good enough for many practical applications.

share|improve this answer
1  
Clever, makes most inequals faster, at the expense of making equals and a few inequals slower. –  Mooing Duck Jul 1 '13 at 1:30

I am noticing that most proposed solution involved sorting booth of the input vectors.I think sorting the arrays compute more that what is strictly necessary for the evaluation the equality of the two vector ( and if the inputs vectors are constant, a copy needs to be made). One other way would be to build an associative container to count the element in each vector... It's also possible to do the reduction of the two vector in parrallel.In the case of very large vector that could give a nice speed up.

template <typename T>  bool compareVector(const std::vector<T> &  vec1, const std::vector<T> & vec2) {
    if (vec1.size() != vec2.size())
        return false ;

    //Here we assuame that T is hashable ...
    auto count_set =  std::unordered_map<T,int>();

    //We count the element in each vector...
    for (unsigned int count = 0 ; count <  vec1.size();++count)
    {
        count_set[vec1[count]]++;
        count_set[vec2[count]]--;
    } ;

    // If everything balance out we should have zero everywhere
    return std::all_of(count_set.begin(),count_set.end(),[](const std::pair<T,int> p) { return p.second == 0 ;});

}

That way depend on the performance of your hashsing function , we might get linear complexity in the the length of booth vector (vs n*logn with the sorting). NB the code might have some bug , did have time to check it ...

Benchmarking this way of comparing two vector to sort based comparison i get on ubuntu 13.10,vmware core i7 gen 3 :

Comparing 200 vectors of 500 elements by counting takes 0.184113 seconds

Comparing 200 vectors of 500 elements by sorting takes 0.276409 seconds

Comparing 200 vectors of 1000 elements by counting takes 0.359848 seconds

Comparing 200 vectors of 1000 elements by sorting takes 0.559436 seconds

Comparing 200 vectors of 5000 elements by counting takes 1.78584 seconds

Comparing 200 vectors of 5000 elements by sorting takes 2.97983 seconds

share|improve this answer
    
const std::vector<T>& smallest_vec = (a.size()<b.size()?a:b); –  Mooing Duck Jul 1 '13 at 1:32
1  
@MooingDuck That wouldn't make sense even with vec1 and vec2 as the first thing this function does is if (vec1.size() != vec2.size()) return false;. Plus I think you still couldn't use that to initialize the hash_map (key-value pair). –  dyp Jul 1 '13 at 1:53
    
I am not sure why this approach did not get the most votes? –  user2381422 Jul 1 '13 at 10:54
    
@user2381422 most definitively this answer did not yet get enough up-votes. It's a really good approach! –  stefan Jul 1 '13 at 11:00
1  
This solution needs O(n) additional space and a hash function; to be efficient, the hash function has to be more efficient than a number of comparisons. You might get additional speed by supplying a bucket count. I think if the for loop is split into two (one over each vector), it might be possible to get better cache coherency (not sure about that one). It is an efficient solution for some cases. +1 –  dyp Jul 1 '13 at 16:43

As others suggested, sorting your vectors beforehand will improve performance.

As an additional optimization you can make heaps out of the vectors to compare (with complexity O(n) instead of sorting with O(n*log(n)).

Afterwards you can pop elements from both heaps (complexity O(log(n))) until you get a mismatch.

This has the advantage that you only heapify instead of sort your vectors if they are not equal.

Below is a code sample. To know what is really fastest, you will have to measure with some sample data for your usecase.

#include <algorithm>

typedef std::vector<int> myvector;

bool compare(myvector& l, myvector& r)
{
   bool possibly_equal=l.size()==r.size();
   if(possibly_equal)
     {
       std::make_heap(l.begin(),l.end());
       std::make_heap(r.begin(),r.end());
       for(int i=l.size();i!=0;--i)
         {
           possibly_equal=l.front()==r.front();
           if(!possibly_equal)
             break;
           std::pop_heap(l.begin(),l.begin()+i);
           std::pop_heap(r.begin(),r.begin()+i);
         }
     }
  return possibly_equal;
}
share|improve this answer

If you use this function a lot on the same vectors, it might be better to keep sorted copies for comparison.

In theory it might even be better to sort the vectors and compare sorted vectors if each one is compared just once, (sorting is O(n*log(n)), comparing sorted vector O(n), while your function is O(n^2). But I suppose the time spent allocating memory for the sorted vectors will dwarf any theoretical gains if you don't compare the same vectors often.

As with all optimisations, profiling is the only way to make sure, I'd try some std::sort / std::equal combo.

share|improve this answer
    
The memory allocation overhead could be overcome by reusing the sorted vectors between calls. This obviously needs care if multiple threads are involved. –  enobayram Jun 30 '13 at 20:16
1  
How can you compare two sorted vectors in O(log(n))? –  Lior Kogan Jun 30 '13 at 20:30
2  
@LiorKogan: That is probably a typo, but it does not really matter, does it? Whether the cost is O(log N) or O(N) (as it actually is) the algorithm is still dominated by the sorting of the vectors O(N log N) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 30 '13 at 20:57
    
@LiorKogan I meant O(n) of course, sorry for the confusion –  Pieter Jul 1 '13 at 6:59
    
sry guys , i was in a bit of a hurry when writting the code.Everything compiles and runs on a c++11 compiler :) –  GreyGeek Jul 1 '13 at 7:01

Like stefan says you need to sort to get better complexity. Then you can use == operator (tnx for the correction in the comments - ste equal will also work but it is more appropriate for comparing ranges not entire containers)

If that is not fast enough only then bother with microoptimization.

Also are vectors guaranteed to be of the same size? If not put that check at the begining.

share|improve this answer
1  
I've made a comment to stefan's answer to use == instead of std::equal because the former is preferred to compare entire containers. wjl has posted the size check in a comment to the OP –  dyp Jun 30 '13 at 22:43
    
good point I upvoted your comment :) –  NoSenseEtAl Jul 1 '13 at 8:27

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