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I'm converting my code from using Handler to AsyncTask. The latter is great at what it does - asynchronous updates and handling of results in the main UI thread. What's unclear to me is how to handle exceptions if something goes haywire in AsyncTask#doInBackground.

The way I do it is to have an error Handler and send messages to it. It works fine, but is it the "right" approach or is there better alternative?

Also I understand that if I define the error Handler as an Activity field, it should execute in the UI thread. However, sometimes (very unpredictably) I will get an Exception saying that code triggered from Handler#handleMessage is executing on the wrong thread. Should I initialize error Handler in Activity#onCreate instead? Placing runOnUiThread into Handler#handleMessage seems redundant but it executes very reliably.

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Why did you want to convert your code? Was there a good reason? –  Haraldo Mar 15 '13 at 15:33
1  
@Haraldo it is a better coding practice at least that's how I feel –  Bostone Mar 15 '13 at 19:16
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8 Answers

up vote 109 down vote accepted

It works fine but is it the "right" approach and is there better alternative?

I hold onto the Throwable or Exception in the AsyncTask instance itself and then do something with it in onPostExecute(), so my error handling has the option of displaying a dialog on-screen.

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5  
Brilliant! No need to monkey with Handlers anymore –  Bostone Nov 16 '09 at 5:47
4  
Is this the way I should hold onto the Throwable or Exception? "Add an instance-variable to your own AsyncTask subclass that will hold the result of your background processing." When you get an exception, store the exception (or some other error-string/code) in this variable. When onPostExecute is called, see if this instance-variable is set to some error. If so, show an error message." (From the user "Streets of Boston" groups.google.com/group/android-developers/browse_thread/thread/…) –  OneWorld Oct 12 '10 at 15:06
1  
@OneWorld: Yes, that should be fine. –  CommonsWare Oct 12 '10 at 15:20
2  
Hi CW, could you please explain your way of doing this in more detail please - maybe with a brief code example? Thanks a lot!! –  Bruiser Mar 23 '11 at 14:10
14  
@Bruiser: github.com/commonsguy/cw-lunchlist/tree/master/15-Internet/… has an AsyncTask following the pattern I describe. –  CommonsWare Mar 23 '11 at 16:51
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Create an AsyncResult object ( which you can also use in other projects)

public class AsyncTaskResult<T> {
private T result;
private Exception error;



public T getResult() {
    return result;
}
public Exception getError() {
    return error;
}


public AsyncTaskResult(T result) {
    super();
    this.result = result;
}


public AsyncTaskResult(Exception error) {
    super();
    this.error = error;
}
}

Return this object from your AsyncTask doInBackground methods and check it in the postExecute. ( You can use this class as a base class for your other async tasks )

Below is a mockup of a task that gets a JSON response from the web server.

AsyncTask<Object,String,AsyncTaskResult<JSONObject>> jsonLoader = new AsyncTask<Object, String, AsyncTaskResult<JSONObject>>() {

        @Override
        protected AsyncTaskResult<JSONObject> doInBackground(
                Object... params) {
            try {
                // get your JSONObject from the server
                return new AsyncTaskResult<JSONObject>(your json object);
            } catch ( Exception anyError) {
                return new AsyncTaskResult<JSONObject>(anyError);
            }
        }

        protected void onPostExecute(AsyncTaskResult<JSONObject> result) {
            if ( result.getError() != null ) {
                // error handling here
            }  else if ( isCancelled()) {
                // cancel handling here
            } else {

                JSONObject realResult = result.getResult();
                // result handling here
            }
        };

    }
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I like it. Nice encapsulation. Since this is a paraphrase of the original answer the answer stays but this definitely deserves a point –  Bostone Jun 13 '11 at 15:53
    
This is a pretty nice demonstration of how useful Generics can be. It's throwing a weird smell in terms of complexity, but not in a way I can really articulate. –  num1 Sep 6 '11 at 20:05
2  
Nice idea, just one question: why do you call super() in AsyncTaskResult when the class doesn't extend anything? –  donturner Jul 15 '12 at 20:54
5  
"no harm" - redundant code is always harmful to readability and maintenance. Get it out of there! :) –  donturner Sep 15 '12 at 10:06
2  
Really liked the solution... coming to think about it - the C# guys used exactly the same method in the C# corresponding BackgroundTask native implementation... –  Vova Mar 21 '13 at 15:57
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If you want to use the RoboGuice framework which brings you other benefits you can try the RoboAsyncTask which has an extra Callback onException(). Works real good and I use it. http://code.google.com/p/roboguice/wiki/RoboAsyncTask

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what's your experience with this? pretty stable? –  nickaknudson Feb 17 '13 at 23:47
    
Is RoboGuice still alive? Seems hasn't been updated since 2012? –  Dimitry K Apr 4 at 16:03
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When I feel the need to handle Exceptions in AsyncTask properly, I use this as super class:

public abstract class ExceptionAsyncTask<Params, Progress, Result> extends AsyncTask<Params, Progress, Result> {

    private Exception exception=null;
    private Params[] params;

    @Override
    final protected Result doInBackground(Params... params) {
        try {
            this.params = params; 
            return doInBackground();
        }
        catch (Exception e) {
            exception = e;
            return null;
        }
    }

    abstract protected Result doInBackground() throws Exception;

    @Override
    final protected void onPostExecute(Result result) {
        super.onPostExecute(result);
        onPostExecute(exception, result);
    }

    abstract protected void onPostExecute(Exception exception, Result result);

    public Params[] getParams() {
        return params;
    }

}

As normal, you override doInBackground in your subclass to do background work, happily throwing Exceptions where needed. You are then forced to implement onPostExecute (because it's abstract) and this gently reminds you to handle all types of Exception, which are passed as parameter. In most cases, Exceptions lead to some type of ui output, so onPostExecute is a perfect place to do that.

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One other way that doesn't depend on variable member sharing is to use cancel.

This is from android docs:

public final boolean cancel (boolean mayInterruptIfRunning)

Attempts to cancel execution of this task. This attempt will fail if the task has already completed, already been cancelled, or could not be cancelled for some other reason. If successful, and this task has not started when cancel is called, this task should never run. If the task has already started, then the mayInterruptIfRunning parameter determines whether the thread executing this task should be interrupted in an attempt to stop the task.

Calling this method will result in onCancelled(Object) being invoked on the UI thread after doInBackground(Object[]) returns. Calling this method guarantees that onPostExecute(Object) is never invoked. After invoking this method, you should check the value returned by isCancelled() periodically from doInBackground(Object[]) to finish the task as early as possible.

So you can call cancel in catch statement and be sure that onPostExcute is never called, but instead onCancelled is invoked on UI thread. So you can show the error message.

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This simple class can help you

public abstract class ExceptionAsyncTask<Param, Progress, Result, Except extends Throwable> extends AsyncTask<Param, Progress, Result> {
    private Except thrown;

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    @Override
    /**
     * Do not override this method, override doInBackgroundWithException instead
     */
    protected Result doInBackground(Param... params) {
        Result res = null;
        try {
            res = doInBackgroundWithException(params);
        } catch (Throwable e) {
            thrown = (Except) e;
        }
        return res;
    }

    protected abstract Result doInBackgroundWithException(Param... params) throws Except;

    @Override
    /**
     * Don not override this method, override void onPostExecute(Result result, Except exception) instead
     */
    protected void onPostExecute(Result result) {
        onPostExecute(result, thrown);
        super.onPostExecute(result);
    }

    protected abstract void onPostExecute(Result result, Except exception);
}
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Personally, I will use this approach. You can just catch the exceptions and print out the stack trace if you need the info.

make your task in background return a boolean value.

it's like this:

    @Override
                protected Boolean doInBackground(String... params) {
                    return readXmlFromWeb(params[0]);
         }

        @Override
                protected void onPostExecute(Boolean result) {

              if(result){
              // no error
               }
              else{
                // error handling
               }
}
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If you know the correct exception then you can call the

Exception e = null;

publishProgress(int ...);

eg:-

    @Override
    protected Object doInBackground(final String... params) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        try {
            return mClient.call(params[0], params[1]);
        } catch(final XMLRPCException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            this.e = e;
            publishProgress(0);
            return null;
        }
    }

and go to "onProgressUpdate" and do the folowing

    @Override
    protected void onProgressUpdate(final Integer... values) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        super.onProgressUpdate(values);
        mDialog.dismiss();
        OptionPane.showMessage(mActivity, "Connection error", e.getMessage());
    }

This 'll be helpful in some case only. Also you can keep a Global Exception variable and access the exception.

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Please, don't do this. That's really, really, bad style! –  Hanno Binder Dec 26 '13 at 17:29
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