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I am learning Python, and trying to write a tip calculator as a first small project.

I came up with the following code:

meal = raw_input("Cost of meal: ")
tax = raw_input("Tax: ")
tip = raw_input("Tip: ")

def tipCalc(meal, tax, tip):

    def convertInput(meal, tax, tip):
        try:
            retMeal = int(meal)
            retTax = int(tax)
            retTip = int(tip)
        except ValueError:
            retMeal = float(meal)
            retTax = float(tax)
            retTip = float(tip)
        return retMeal
        return retTax
        return retTip

    convertInput(meal, tax, tip)

    retTax = retTax / 100
    retTip = retTip / 100
    total = retMeal + retTax + retTip
    print total

tipCalc(meal, tax, tip)

However, I am getting the following error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
   File "/Users/dustin/Desktop/tipcalc.py", line 27, in <module>
     tipCalc(meal, tax, tip)
   File "/Users/dustin/Desktop/tipcalc.py", line 22, in tipCalc
     retTax = retTax / 100
UnboundLocalError: local variable 'retTax' referenced before assignment

This seems like a simple error to fix, but I can't seem to find an error in my logic.

share|improve this question
    
Why did you edit the question to remove the problem with your code? This makes the question incomprehensible. –  Marcin Jun 30 '13 at 23:26
    
@Marcin My mistake. I appreciate you rolling it back. –  dpl47 Jun 30 '13 at 23:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You probably mean this:

def tipCalc(meal, tax, tip):

    def convertInput(meal, tax, tip):
        try:
            retMeal = int(meal)
            retTax = int(tax)
            retTip = int(tip)
        except ValueError:
            retMeal = float(meal)
            retTax = float(tax)
            retTip = float(tip)
        return retMeal, retTax, retTip

    retMeal, retTax, retTip = convertInput(meal, tax, tip)

    retTax = retTax / 100
    retTip = retTip / 100
    total = retMeal + retTax + retTip
    print total

tipCalc(meal, tax, tip)

If you wish to return multiple values from a class method, multiple return statements do not work. You need to have 1 return statements, and send back as many values as you wish to.

Also, the error was, at the time of calculating retTax = retTax / 100, the variable was not already declared.

share|improve this answer
1  
convertInput should be moved out of tipCalc as well. –  Blender Jun 30 '13 at 23:00
    
@Blender self. should also work right ? –  karthikr Jun 30 '13 at 23:02
    
Where is self defined? –  Blender Jun 30 '13 at 23:03
2  
@DustinL.: You're creating the function every time you call tipCalc, which is unnecessary. –  Blender Jun 30 '13 at 23:06
1  
There you go, one more answer. This is an important one to understand about Python's handling of division in Python 2.x, so be sure to read it. –  rmunn Jun 30 '13 at 23:23

The other answers have covered the reason for the exception you're getting, so I'm going to skip over that. Instead, I want to point out a subtle mistake that's going to bite you sooner or later and make your code calculate the wrong values if either the tax or the tip are ever entered as whole numbers.

IMPORTANT: This answer is true for Python 2.x (which I see you're using). In Python 3.x, the default behavior of division changes and this answer would no longer be true (and your code would work correctly).

With that in mind, let's look at something in the Python interpreter for a minute.

Python 2.7.4 (default, Apr 19 2013, 18:28:01) 
[GCC 4.7.3] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> 2.0 / 3.0
0.6666666666666666
>>> 2 / 3
0

In the first example, we see what happens when we divide two floats together: we get a float with the best approximation of the result we can. (2/3 will never be exactly represented by a float, but it's a close enough result for nearly all purposes). But see the second example? Instead of 0.666..., it returned 0. Why is that?

That's because in Python 2.x, dividing two ints together is guaranteed to always return an int, so it rounds down (always down) to the int. In combination with the % operator (which returns remainders), this lets you do "grade school" division, where 3 goes into 7 just 2 times, with 1 left over. This is quite useful in many algorithms, so it's kept around. If you want to use floating-point division (where you get a float result), you need to make sure that at least one of your numbers in the division is a float.

Thus, you should do 2.0 / 3 or 2 / 3.0 if you want the 0.6666... result in our example. And in your code, you should either do:

retTax = retTax / 100
retTip = retTip / 100

or else you should change your convertInput() function to always return floats no matter what. I suggest the latter:

def convertInput(meal, tax, tip):
    retMeal = float(meal)
    retTax = float(tax)
    retTip = float(tip)
    return retMeal, retTax, retTip

That way when you divide them by 100 later, you'll get a fraction. Otherwise, you could have ended up with an int result in tax or tip, and gotten a rounded-off value in your calculation.

There's another way to change Python's behavior regarding division, with the from __future__ import division statement in Python 2.x (which applies some of the Python 3.x rules). I won't go into it in detail now, but now you know what to Google if you want to read more about it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you VERY much for the clear information. I've implemented the changes and what I assume to be a proper way to write this is here: pastebin.com/QZpzB1uD Could you please comment on that and tell me if there's more I should change? –  dpl47 Jun 30 '13 at 23:30
    
Looks good now. The only other change I would make is that I don't like re-using the retTax and retTip names for two different concepts. First you use those names for the percentages, then you use the same names for the dollar amounts. I would do something like taxPercent = retTax / 100.0 followed by taxAmount = taxPercent * retMeal. This avoids confusion later on when you re-read your own code; the variable names make it much clearer what's going on. –  rmunn Jun 30 '13 at 23:43
    
That's an important principle in programming, actually: thinking about the person reading the code six months from now, who has no idea what it does and has to figure it out just from the code. Be kind to that person and make it easy for him, because that person is most likely going to be you. Take it from an experienced programmer: six months from now, you'll have almost no memory of your own code, because you'll have written so much code in the meantime -- so you'll be essentially starting from scratch as you read it. Which means that you really do need to use good variable names, etc. –  rmunn Jun 30 '13 at 23:45
    
Thank you for the advice. I can see how that would be useful in the case of an ongoing project or for nostalgic purposes, however, in this case, I just wanted the script to work properly and efficiently, which thanks to the help of all of you, it seems to be doing. :) –  dpl47 Jun 30 '13 at 23:48
    
With a simple script like this, you might be right that this is a one-shot and you won't reuse it later. But you'd be surprised how many "one-shot" scripts end up getting reused, in part or in whole, years down the road. So planning ahead for easy maintenance is always a good idea, plus it helps develop the habit of writing clear, easy-to-understand code -- a habit which will stand you in good stead. –  rmunn Jun 30 '13 at 23:56

The retMeal, retTax and retTip variable are local to convertInput and you're not using the value returned by the function, add an assignement:

retMeal, retTax, retTip = convertInput(meal, tax, tip)
share|improve this answer

Other than what the others have pointed out, I really see no real need for the function

def convertInput(meal, tax, tip):

Just use floats from the beginning

share|improve this answer
    
It's useful for converting strings to floats, so he should keep it around, but he should get rid of the conversions to int. I'm currently writing an answer explaining why in more detail. –  rmunn Jun 30 '13 at 23:14

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