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From a previous question:

Doing a static_assert that a template type is another template

Andy Prowl provided me with this code that allows me to static_assert that a template type is another template type:

template<template<typename...> class TT, typename... Ts>
struct is_instantiation_of : public std::false_type { };

template<template<typename...> class TT, typename... Ts>
struct is_instantiation_of<TT, TT<Ts...>> : public std::true_type { };

template<typename T>
struct foo {};

template<typename FooType>
struct bar {
  static_assert(is_instantiation_of<foo,FooType>::value, ""); //success
};

int main(int,char**)
{
  bar<foo<int>> b;
  return 0;
}

This works great.

But this does not work for a subclass of foo<whatever>:

template<template<typename...> class TT, typename... Ts>
struct is_instantiation_of : public std::false_type { };

template<template<typename...> class TT, typename... Ts>
struct is_instantiation_of<TT, TT<Ts...>> : public std::true_type { };

template<typename T>
struct foo {};

template<typename FooType>
struct bar {
  static_assert(is_instantiation_of<foo,FooType>::value, ""); //fail
};

//Added: Subclass of foo<int>
struct foo_sub : foo<int> {
};

int main(int,char**)
{
  bar<foo_sub> b; //Changed: Using the subclass
  return 0;
}

Can Andy Prowl's is_instantiation_of code be extended to allow for subclasses?

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Using a template alias instead of a template within a template –  Kerrek SB Jun 30 '13 at 23:18
    
@KerrekSB This is a completely different question (but same introduction) –  roger.james Jun 30 '13 at 23:19
    
Couldn't you just have made it a self-contained, short question, like "Is it possible to check whether a class is derived from a template instance"? –  Kerrek SB Jun 30 '13 at 23:29
    
My answer seems to handle the template alias issue as well. –  Vaughn Cato Jul 1 '13 at 4:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As KerrekSB wrote in his answer, an equally general extension of the solution you posted cannot be achieved.

However, if it is OK for you to give up a bit of genericity, you can write a type trait specific for foo (exploiting the fact that derived-to-base is one of the few conversions that are performed during type deduction):

#include <type_traits>

template<typename T>
struct foo {};

template<typename T>
constexpr std::true_type test(foo<T> const&);

constexpr std::false_type test(...);

template<typename T>
struct is_instantiation_of_foo : public decltype(test(std::declval<T>())) { };

You would then use it like so:

template<typename FooType>
struct bar {
  static_assert(is_instantiation_of_foo<FooType>::value, "");
};

struct foo_sub : foo<int> {
};

int main(int,char**)
{
  bar<foo_sub> b; // Will not fire
  return 0;
}

Here is a live example.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm thinking about giving up the genericity and repeat this on a case by case basis, seems much simpler. But Vaughn Cato has claimed that his solution is general and solves both the subclass and alias issue. What do you think? –  roger.james Jul 1 '13 at 10:19
    
Your solution does not work if the base class has a pure virtual function and the subclass overrides it. Can this be fixed? Live example: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/… –  roger.james Jul 1 '13 at 16:23
1  
@roger.james: Yes, just have the test function accept by reference to const instead of accepting by value. I updated the answer. Here is a live example. –  Andy Prowl Jul 1 '13 at 16:27

This seems to work in many cases:

#include <iostream>
#include <utility>

template <typename T> struct foo { };

struct foo_sub : foo<int> { };

// A fallback function that will only be used if there is no other choice
template< template <typename> class X >
std::false_type isX(...)
{
  return std::false_type();
}

// Our function which recognizes any type that is an instantiation of X or 
// something derived from it.
template< template <typename> class X, typename T >
std::true_type isX(const X<T> &)
{
  return std::true_type();
}

// Now we can make a template whose value member's type is based
// the return type of isX(t), where t is an instance of type T.
// Use std::declval to get a dummy instance of T.
template <template <typename> class X,typename T>
struct is_instantiation_of {
  static decltype(isX<X>(std::declval<T>())) value;
};

template <typename FooType>
struct bar {
  static_assert(is_instantiation_of<foo,FooType>::value,"");
};

int main(int,char**)
{
  //bar<int> a;  // fails the static_assert
  bar<foo<int>> b;  // works
  bar<foo_sub> c;  // works
  return 0;
}

As noted by Yakk, one place that it doesn't work is if you have a class derived from multiple instantiations of foo, such as

struct foo_sub2 : foo<int>, foo<double> { };
share|improve this answer
    
Is std::string? –  Yakk Jul 1 '13 at 11:19
    
@Yakk: sorry, I don't understand your comment. Are you asking if bar<std::string> works? –  Vaughn Cato Jul 1 '13 at 12:39
    
(...) won't accept some types, if I remember rightly (but that might just be a warning). And a type struct x:foo<int>,foo<double>{}; will have ambiguity problems. –  Yakk Jul 1 '13 at 12:43
    
@Yakk: With g++ 4.7.2 -W -Wall, I don't get a warning from isX(...) using std::string. Agreed there is an issue with ambiguity. –  Vaughn Cato Jul 1 '13 at 13:19
    
5.2.2.7 -- in C++03 it is undefined, in C++11 it is conditionally defined with undefined semantics(!). Replace it with vaiardic Ts const&... and I think you step away from that scary verbage while still matching worse than the other overload? Or pass a pointer and match on that. –  Yakk Jul 1 '13 at 17:57

You can't do that in C++11. You would essentially have to quantify over all class types and check if any of them is a base of the candidate.

There was a proposal in TR2 (which I hear is now defunct), possibly making it into C++14, to add traits std::bases and std::direct_bases which enumerate base classes of a given class, and thus effectively solve your problem (i.e. apply your existing trait to each base class).

GCC does provide this trait in <tr2/type_traits>, if that helps.

share|improve this answer

I am on my phone, so this might not work.

The goal is to use SFINAE and overloading to ask the question "is there a base class that matches this compile time traits question?"

template<template<typename>class Test>
struct helper {
   static std::false_type test(...);
   template<typename T, typename=typename std::enable_if< Test<T>::value >
   static std::true_type test(T const&);
};
template<template<typename>class Test, typename T, typename=void>
struct exactly_one_base_matches :std::false_type {};
template<template<typename>class Test, typename T>
struct exactly_one_base_matches<Test,T,
  typename std::enable_if<decltype(helper<Test>::test(std::declval<T>()))::value>::type>
:std::true_type {};

If that does not work for a generic test, one where test does pattern matching might. ... might need to be replaced. I cannot think of a way to deal with multiple bases that pass the test...

I think we can do better. There are three possible results from calling the above.

First, one parent or self matches the test. Second, it matches the catch-all. Third, it is ambiguous because it could pass the test in more than one way.

If we improve the catch-all to catch everything at low priority (Ts...&& maybe), we can make failure to compile a success condition.

Return true from SFINAE, true from match-one, and false from catch-all match-none.

share|improve this answer
    
And tested, the technique doesn't work. Neither does the SFINAE attempt to deal with ambiguous overloads... –  Yakk Jul 1 '13 at 21:17

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