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Say I have an instance of a class Foo, and I want to grab a list of all of its methods that are annotated a certain way. I want to have a reference to the method itself, so I'm not looking to use reflection to invoke the method each time, just to grab a reference to it the first time.

In other words, I want to do the reflection equivalent of this:

class Foo {
  a() {print("a");}
}

void main() {
  var f = new Foo();
  var x = f.a; // Need reflective way of doing this
  x(); // prints "a"
}

I have tried using InstanceMirror#getField, but methods are not considered fields so that didn't work. Any ideas?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As far as I understand reflection in Dart, there's no way to get the actual method as you wish to. (I'll very happily delete this answer if someone comes along and shows how to do that.)

The best I can come up with to ameliorate some of what you probably don't like about using reflection to invoke the method is this:

import 'dart:mirrors';

class Foo {
  a() {print("a");}
}

void main() {
  var f = new Foo();

  final fMirror = reflect(f);
  final aSym = new Symbol('a');
  final x = () => fMirror.invoke(aSym, []);

  x(); // prints "a"
}

Again, I know that's not quite what you're looking for, but I believe it's as close as you can get.

Side note: getField invokes the getter and returns the result -- it's actually fine if the getter is implemented as a method. It doesn't work for you here, but for a different reason than you thought.

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What you're trying to get would be described as the "closurized" version of the method. That is, you want to get the method as a function, where the receiver is implicit in the function invocation. There isn't a way to get that from the mirror. You could get a methodMirror as reflect(foo).type.methods[const Symbol("a")] but you can't invoke the result.

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I don't agree that it's "closurizsd" really. In the example given in the question x was assigned the method for the instance variable, "f" -- "var x = f.a;". That said, it seems a really fraught way to go about what ever the end-user use case is(??). –  will May 5 at 2:21
    
Closurized is the term that is used in Dart for what happens when you have an instance method and you get a reference to it as an invokable thing, i.e. a closure. It may not be closing over any environment, but it's holding onto the instance it applies to. –  Alan Knight May 5 at 16:32
    
The more traditional definition comes from LISP and it's an inner (or internal) and thus anonymous 'structure'. My comment is that the example question, wants the a() method of-the-instance f" (lexically). Again, lexically speaking, this is a method in the context of the instance *f. The example per se doesn't make sense in most OO languages, for those where it might work like C++ with virtuals, that is what you'd get the a() method associated with the instance variable f of class FOO. I hope that clarifies the comment. –  will May 7 at 5:47
    
I'm not familiar with your terminology of 'structure', but in LISP I would think of it as a function that closes over its environment. It might make more sense if you think of closurizing a method as f.a returning () => f.a(). That is, it returns a closure that closes over the instance. –  Alan Knight May 7 at 14:33
import 'package:reflection/reflection.dart';

class Foo {
  @CoolMethod()
  a(s) {print("a says $s");}

  @CoolMethod()
  b(s) {print("b says $s");}
}

void main() {
  var f = new Foo();
  findByName(f);
  findByAnnotation(f);
}

void findByName(Foo foo) {
  var method = typeInfo(Foo).getMethod(#a);
  var coolMethod = objectInfo(const CoolMethod());
  var metadata = method.metadata;
  if(method != null && method.metadata.contains(coolMethod)) {
    objectInfo(foo).invoke(#a, ["hello"]);
  }
}

void findByAnnotation(Foo foo) {
  var methods = typeInfo(Foo).getMethods();
  var coolMethod = objectInfo(const CoolMethod());
  for(var method in methods.values) {
    var metadata = method.metadata;
    if(method.metadata.contains(coolMethod)) {
      objectInfo(foo).invoke(method.simpleName, ["goodbye"]);
    }
  }
}

class CoolMethod {
  const CoolMethod();
}
a says hello
a says goodbye
b says goodbye
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