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I'm trying to make a program that basically has an inputted string and what the program is supposed to do is to output the character that occurs the most and says how many times it occurs. It also outputs the character that occurs the least and says how many times it occurs.

I'm having trouble getting started with this as I'm doing this in part of a summer college course so its a whole semesters class in 6 weeks so the class goes by pretty fast. Could someone please explain the logic behind this for me so I could get started?

We haven't learned many different methods so if you could stick to basic python programming that would be nice. <- Like while loops and for loops we learned, lists, tuples, strings etc. We didn't learn any thing else..

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
dict are a fundamental aspect of Python. If you haven't covered them after 6 weeks, your teacher is not doing a good job. It's possible to solve your question with just lists and strings, however it will be extremely inefficient and ugly code. If you'll allow us to use ord() you can still regain some efficiency but it will still be ugly –  gnibbler Jul 1 '13 at 3:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I like a challenge. No complex data structures, just simple loops and ifs. If this is too complex then your teacher has done a bad job!

w = "This is the song that doesn't end; yes it goes on and on my friend."
max_letter = w[0]
min_letter = w[0]
max = w.count(w[0])
min = w.count(w[0])
for c in w:
    if c is not " ":
        if w.count(c) > max:
            max_letter = c
            max = w.count(c)
        if w.count(c) < min:
            max_letter = c
            max = w.count(c)

print max, max_letter
print min, min_letter

>>> 7 n
>>> 1 T

@Rohan asked how I built this up, and its only fair I describe it. Basicaly, its an exercise in answering questions, and making new questions as I go through.

What are the maximum and minimum occuring letters? The first thing you know is you need to find and print some things. Those things are the minimum and maximum letters. At the start of everything, I know the first letter will be both, so lets start there. It should be said though, what happens if the string is empty?

max_letter = w[0]
min_letter = w[0]

If these letters are the most and least occuring how often do they appear? Now, I know I need to keep track of extra information, and since I decided the first letter is the minimum and maximum set the count of this letter to be the min and max.

max = w.count(w[0])
min = w.count(w[0])

How can I know that these letters really are the most and least common? Well, I need to check all of the letters, I can do this in a loop:

for c in w:

Is this current character something I am checking for? In this case, I only want things that aren't spaces, but I could check for anything here.

    if c is not " ":

Is this current letter the most common? Not sure, so check it against the maximum, if it is then update what the letter with the maximum count is, and what the maximum count is.

        if w.count(c) > max:
            max_letter = c
            max = w.count(c)

Same for the least common...

        if w.count(c) < min:
            max_letter = c
            max = w.count(c)

Then print out what I found out

print max, max_letter
print min, min_letter

Can this algorithm be better? Yes. This algorithm checked if 'n' was the maximum letter 7 times. The answer never changes. It also runs through the string many times -

  • Once per letter in the for loop
  • In a simple counting algorithm, it would run through again in each iteration to get the count.
share|improve this answer
    
Probably should be if str.isalnum(), but even that filters some nonspace punctuation that arguably should be counted. –  Brian Cain Jul 1 '13 at 4:18
    
Hi I have a stupid question, but what is c? Is it like a variable in the the string w? It doesn't have to be defined beforehand right? –  Panthy Jul 1 '13 at 4:20
    
c's value will change with each iteration of that for loop. it's each individual character in the input string, w. –  Brian Cain Jul 1 '13 at 4:21
    
c is declared as the iterated variable and only has scope for that for loop. It is set to each letter in the string in turn. –  Lego Stormtroopr Jul 1 '13 at 4:23
    
@BrianCain technically punctuation should be counted according to the question, so now it just compares against a space. Besides, wouldn't want to use any of those pesky built-ins. –  Lego Stormtroopr Jul 1 '13 at 4:24

You can use collections.Counter:

>>> Counter(''.join("This is a string!".split())).most_common()
[('i', 3), ('s', 3), ('a', 1), ('!', 1), ('g', 1), ('h', 1), ('n', 1), ('r', 1), ('T', 1), ('t', 1)]

Or, for learning purposes, you can use a for-loop, along with a dictionary to keep count:

mystring = ''.join("This is a string!".split())
mydict = {}
for char in mystring:
    if char not in mydict:
        mydict[char] = 1
    else:
        mydict[char] += 1

print mydict
# {'a': 1, '!': 1, 'g': 1, 'i': 3, 'h': 1, 'n': 1, 's': 3, 'r': 1, 'T': 1, 't': 1}
print max(mydict.items(), key=lambda x: x[1])[0]
# i

max() gets the maximum value from an object. We pass it a key argument, because we are working with a dictionary.

mydict.items() returns a list of tuples, with the key and value in one tuple.

key=lambda x: x[1] is telling python to look through the second item in the tuple, because that is the number that we want. Finally, [0] is used to get the key.

mydict.items looks like this:

[('a', 1), ('!', 1), ('g', 1), ('i', 3), ('h', 1), ('n', 1), ('s', 3), ('r', 1), ('T', 1), ('t', 1)]

It's like the unpacked version of a dictionary.


For the least common, simply use min() :). Isn't python fun?

share|improve this answer
1  
Technically yes, but wouldn't there be some eyebrows raised if someone six weeks in started to use library methods? –  Makoto Jul 1 '13 at 3:34
    
yes I haven't learned anything like this so I don't think I'd be allowed to use this..... –  Panthy Jul 1 '13 at 3:37
    
@Rohan I have edited my answer. –  Haidro Jul 1 '13 at 3:37
1  
@Makoto, are you serious? I've taught people enough Python in one day to be able to do real work. –  gnibbler Jul 1 '13 at 3:45
    
@gnibbler: Teaching someone in the field is worlds removed from teaching someone in the classroom. –  Makoto Jul 1 '13 at 3:46

This is solved straightforwardly with using a dictionary and some methods around retrieving the key. Dictionaries are guaranteed to have unique keys, but their order isn't guaranteed.

d = dict()
w = "This is the song that doesn't end; yes it goes on and on my friend."
for letter in w:
    if d.get(letter) is not None:
        d[letter] += 1
    else:
        d[letter] = 1

I'd like to leave the rest for you to solve, as getting the count of elements was the largest hurdle. You can get the max and min from this relatively easy, as well.

share|improve this answer
    
what is dict()? We didn't learn that either –  Panthy Jul 1 '13 at 3:39
    
@Rohan dict() is equivalent to making an empty dictionary, i.e, {} –  Haidro Jul 1 '13 at 3:40
    
dict() is a dictionary, which is shorthand for an empty dictionary {}. –  Makoto Jul 1 '13 at 3:40
    
can I make it a list? –  Panthy Jul 1 '13 at 3:40
4  
letter not in d is preferable to d.get(letter) is not None –  gnibbler Jul 1 '13 at 3:47
from collections import Counter
the_string = "This is a string!"
Counter(x for x in the_string if not x.isspace()).most_common()

Here is a way to get started without Counters/dicts/etc.

>>> the_string = "This is a string!"
>>> A = [0] * 256
>>> for x in the_string:
...     if not x.isspace():
...         A[ord(x)] += 1
... 

ord() maps each character onto a position in A

>>> A
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 3, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 3, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]

You easily can find one of the most common characters like this

>>> chr(A.index(max(A)))
'i'

The minimum is more complicated, since we need the minimum that isn't 0

>>> chr(A.index(min(x for x in A if x)))
'!'

Ok, you probably aren't comfortable with max and min and generator expressions, but you should be able to work out for to do it with a for loop after 6 weeks

share|improve this answer
1  
It's not that it's wrong. It's that someone whose only a few weeks into the program would get many looks if they suddenly used the right methods. –  Makoto Jul 1 '13 at 3:42
3  
So now we are downvoting correct answers now because we don't want to raise eyebrows? Are students not allowed to look for better solutions than they have been taught these days? –  gnibbler Jul 1 '13 at 3:54
    
StackOverflow doesn't exist to do peoples homework. @Rohan wants to post his entire syllabus and have someone write code against that, they should close the question as tool localised and hire a tutor. This is an excellent answer, that answers the question perfectly. –  Lego Stormtroopr Jul 1 '13 at 4:00

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