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I have a C++ program that I'm using to test that another program doesn't crash. The parent code(we'll call it 'parentProg') looks something like this:

int run(const char * command)
{
  ...

  int retCode = system(command);
  printf("Code is %d\n",retCode);
  if(retCode == 134) //128 + SIGABORT
  {
    // Record error conditions
    ...
  }
}

The command variable contains the program being tested(we'll call it 'childProg'). With a previous Linux distribution, this code worked as expected. If a.out crashed or hit an assertion, it would return 134 and the error handling code would run. However after I upgraded to a newer Linux distribution this is no longer the case. Instead I see a return code of 6 when run as a spawned program, using GDB, or nemiver. Strangely, it reverts back to 134 if I run the child program alone, or using DDD.

For the following tests I've modified childProg to be only the following code:

#include <assert.h>

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
  assert(0);
  return 0;
}

childProg by itself

[user@localhost multi]$ ./childProg 
childProg: temp.cpp:5: int main(int, char **): Assertion `0' failed.
Abort
[user@localhost multi]$ echo $?
134

parentProg which spawns childProg

[user@localhost multi]$ ./parentProg 1 o
Running 1 times
childProg: temp.cpp:5: int main(int, char **): Assertion `0' failed.
Code is 6
Done 0
[user@localhost multi]$ 

With GDB

(gdb) run
Starting program: parentProg 1 o
Running 1 times
Detaching after fork from child process 3311.
childProg: temp.cpp:5: int main(int, char **): Assertion `0' failed.
Code is 6
Done 0
[Inferior 1 (process 3295) exited normally]
(gdb) 

With DDD

(gdb) run 1 o
Starting program: parentProg 1 o
Running 1 times
Detaching after fork from child process 3336.
childProg: temp.cpp:5: int main(int, char **): Assertion `0' failed.
Code is 134
Done 0
[Inferior 1 (process 3319) exited normally]
(gdb) 

This works as expected

[me@localhost multi]$ /bin/sh -c ./childProg
childProg: temp.cpp:5: int main(int, char **): Assertion `0' failed.
Abort
[me@localhost multi]$ echo $?
134

What could possibly be going on here? Is there a better way to check for crashing/segfaults/assertions other than checking the exit code?

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2  
Just to be clear, when the program is being debugged, if it generates a core dump, then the return value is ORed with 128 i.e. WCOREDUMP. This flag is NOT implemented on all versions of all variants of UNIX. Greg's code snippet should do the trick for you as the WEXITSTATUS() macro ignores everything but the lowest 8bits that contain the error code, in your case 6. –  TheCodeArtist Jul 11 '13 at 2:03
    
@Adam12 It appears that in GDB the code is 6 because that has the 128 subtracted. In DDD the 128 is not subtracted and the code is 134. –  Charles Addis Jul 12 '13 at 17:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted
+50

The <sys/wait.h> header file contains macros for analyzing return codes.

To check the reason for exit, you can do something like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>

...

void run(const char *command)
{
    int retcode = system(command);

    if (WIFEXITED(retcode))
    {
        int status = WEXITSTATUS(retcode);
        if (status)
        {
            printf("Exited normally with FAILURE status of %d!\n", status);
        }
        else
        {
            printf("Exited normally with SUCCESS(0) status!\n");
        }
    }
    else if (WIFSIGNALED(retcode))
    {
        int signal = WTERMSIG(retcode);
        printf("Abnormal termination - program crashed or was aborted with signal %d\n", signal);
    }

}

See "man waitpid" for a description of these macros.

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Thanks. This code works reliably. I was testing for 134 based on this question. –  user597225 Jul 14 '13 at 23:24

(134 = 6 | __WCOREFLAG)

See man 2 wait

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