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How can I generate the given series in Java

JDK1.0
JDK1.1
JDK1.2
JDK1.3
JDK1.4
JDK1.5
JDK1.6

I used the floating variable in for loop but it generates an error.

for(float f=1.0;f<1.7;f=f+0.1)
     System.out.println("JDK"+f);
share|improve this question
    
What exactly is what you want to do? print 7 strings? – morgano Jul 1 '13 at 4:58
    
use two integers – radai Jul 1 '13 at 4:58
1  
If you could show the code that you've used and say what error resulted, and where, someone should be able to explain why the error occurs. In the absence of code, that is very difficult. – Simon Jul 1 '13 at 4:59
1  
This is a very simple problem. You could have just googled it out. – shashank93rao Jul 1 '13 at 5:02
3  
Set some time out of your weekend to read What Every Computer Scientist Should Know About Floating-Point Arithmetic, and you'll understand everything about floats related to why such pieces of code will never work as expected: docs.oracle.com/cd/E19957-01/806-3568/ncg_goldberg.html – Patashu Jul 1 '13 at 5:03
for(int i = 0; i < 7; i++){
    System.out.println("JDK 1." + i);
}

I think this should solve your problem

share|improve this answer
for(float f=1.0; f<1.7; f=f+0.1)
     System.out.println("JDK"+f);

Needs to be changed to

for(float f=1.0F; f<1.7; f=f+0.1F)
    System.out.println("JDK"+f);

Or use a double

for(double f=1.0; f<1.7; f=f+0.1)
    System.out.println("JDK"+f);

Using doubles are better, because the loss of precision that is associated with floating-point arithmetic is less apparent. For example, the first possible fix outputs:

JDK1.0
JDK1.1
JDK1.2
JDK1.3000001
JDK1.4000001
JDK1.5000001
JDK1.6000001

The second fix outputs:

JDK1.0
JDK1.1000000014901161
JDK1.2000000029802322
JDK1.3000000044703484
JDK1.4000000059604645
JDK1.5000000074505806
JDK1.6000000089406967

You can modify the second fix as follows to remedy this problem:

for(double f=1.0; f<1.7; f=f+0.1)
    System.out.printf("JDK%.1f\n", f);
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+1 for at least attempting to point out the problems the OP is having and why – MadProgrammer Jul 1 '13 at 5:10

... and why not

for(int f=0;f<7;f++)
    System.out.println("JDK1."+f);

also, you were getting the compilation problems because of this:

float f = 1.0; // Compilation error

0.1 is by default a double, it must be:

float f = 1.0f;
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You can use these Code segment

for(int f=0;f<7;f=f+1)
     System.out.println("JDK 1."+f);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks man Its working. – Sujeet Kumar Jul 1 '13 at 5:03

There are at least two issues...

The first is that Java assumes that all decimal numbers are double. This means you try and use a float assignment, Java tries to warn you that there might be a loss of percision due to the converstion.

You can over come this by either using a double of telling the compiler that you want to treat the value as a float by suffixing it with f

For example...

for(float f=1.0f;f<1.7f;f+=0.1f) {
    System.out.println("JDK"+f);
}

The next problem you will face is the fact that the number printed out won't meet your requirements, as 0.4 isn't exactly 0.4

In this case, you need to use a NumberFormat of some kind to format the number the way you want.

For example...

NumberFormat nf = NumberFormat.getNumberInstance();
for(float f=1.0f;f<1.7f;f+=0.1f) {
    System.out.println("JDK"+nf.format(f));
}
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If it is going to be less than 1.7 why not just have

for(int f = 1; f < 7; f++){
  System.out.println("JDK1." + f);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Its Working, Thanks.. – Sujeet Kumar Jul 1 '13 at 5:04
for(double i=1.0;i<=1.7;i=i+0.1){
            BigDecimal bd = new BigDecimal(i);
            System.out.println("JDK"+bd.setScale(1,1));
        }
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Try this:

public static void main(String[] args) {

        DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("#.##");

        for (double f = 1.0; f < 1.7; f = f + 0.1) {

            System.out.println("JDK" + df.format(f));
        }
    }

You cant use float,but can use double like this

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