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This may be more of a scoping question. I'm trying to set a JSON object within a $.getJSON function, but I need to be able to use that object outside of the callback.

var jsonIssues = {};  // declare json variable

$.getJSON("url", function(data) {
    jsonIssues = data.Issues;
});

// jsonIssues not accessible here

A similar question like this one was asked in another post, and the consensus was that anything I need to do with the JSON objects needs to be done within the callback function, and cannot be accessed anywhere else. Is there really no way that I can continue to access/manipulate that JSON object outside of the $.getJSON callback? What about returning the variable, or setting a global?

I'd appreciate any help. This just doesn't seem right...

UPDATE:

Tried setting the $.ajax() async setting to false, and running through the same code, with no luck. Code I tried is below:

var jsonIssues = {};  // declare json variable

$.ajax({ async: false });

$.getJSON("url", function(data) {
    jsonIssues = data.Issues;
});

// jsonIssues still not accessible here

Also, I've had a couple responses that a global variable should work fine. I should clarify that all of this code is within $(document).ready(function() {. To set a global variable, should I just declare it before the document.ready? As such:

var jsonIssues = {};

$(document).ready(function() {

  var jsonIssues = {};  // declare json variable

  $.getJSON("url", function(data) {
      jsonIssues = data.Issues;
  });

  // now accessible?
}

I was under the impression that that a variable declared within document.ready should be "globally" accessible and modifiable within any part of document.ready, including subfunctions like the $.getJSON callback function. I may need to read up on javascript variable scoping, but there doesn't seem to be an easy to achieve what I'm going for. Thanks for all the responses.

UPDATE #2: Per comments given to answers below, I did use $.ajax instead of .getJSON, and achieved the results I wanted. Code is below:

var jsonIssues = {};
    $.ajax({
    	url: "url",
    	async: false,
    	dataType: 'json',
    	success: function(data) {
    		jsonIssues = data.Issues;
    	}
    });

    // jsonIssues accessible here -- good!!

Couple follow-up comments to my answers (and I appreciate them all). My purpose in doing this is to load a JSON object initially with a list of Issues that the user can then remove from, and save off. But this is done via subsequent interactions on the page, and I cannot foresee what the user will want to do with the JSON object within the callback. Hence the need to make it accessible once the callback complete. Does anyone see a flaw in my logic here? Seriously, because there may be something I'm not seeing...

Also, I was reading through the .ajax() jQuery documentation, and it says that setting async to false "Loads data synchronously. Blocks the browser while the requests is active. It is better to block user interaction by other means when synchronization is necessary."

Does anyone have an idea how I should be blocking user interaction while this is going on? Why is it such a concern? Thanks again for all the responses.

share|improve this question
    
$(document).ready is just a function that's called when the document is ready. After the setup of the Ajax call (and anything else you're setting up), the code is event driven--none of your code is running until the Ajax call happens. That's why you put "everything" into the callback. Aside from callbacks, none of your code is executing. –  Nosredna Nov 16 '09 at 3:23
1  
A global is fine, but it will only be valid AFTER the JSON happens. Which is why you access it from the callback. The callback can call other functions--you don't have to shove all code in there, if that's your concern. –  Nosredna Nov 16 '09 at 3:32
    
See my updated answer on examples of the solutions I mentioned. –  strager Nov 16 '09 at 3:44
1  
Block user interaction by not giving them anything to do during the ajax call. For instance, if you have buttons that let them do something with the Ajax info loaded in, don't show the buttons until the data is loaded. For extreme cases, throw a div over everything to catch clicks and show an ajax throbber. –  Nosredna Nov 16 '09 at 3:56
    
Your follow-up question seems too different from your initial problem and deserves its own SO question. (It seems to be a pretty good one, too.) –  strager Nov 16 '09 at 4:36

6 Answers 6

up vote 15 down vote accepted

$.getJSON is asynchronous. That is, the code after the call is executed while $.getJSON fetches and parses the data and calls your callback.

So, given this:

a();

$.getJSON("url", function() {
    b();
});

c();

The order of the calls of a, b, and c may be either a b c (what you want, in this case) or a c b (more likely to actually happen).

The solution?

Synchronous XHR requests

Make the request synchronous instead of asynchronous:

a();

$.ajax({
    async: false,
    url: "url",
    success: function() {
        b();
    }
});

c();

Restructure code

Move the call to c after the call to b:

a();

$.getJSON("url", function() {
    b();

    c();
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks strager for the quick reply. You'll have to forgive me.. even with a CS degree, I'm still kind of a noob at some of this stuff. I think I've seen that you can set async to false in the $.ajax(..)? Can I just say "$.ajax({async: false});"? Also, and maybe more importantly, what will it means once asynchronous is turned off? Everything executes top to bottom? Thanks again.. –  Matt Powell Nov 16 '09 at 3:00
4  
A sound answer. Unfortunately (as the OP has discovered in the question update), $.getJSON does not provide an "option override" for the asynch option. @Mega Matt: you'll have to call $.ajax instead of $.getJSON, passing dataType:"json" in order to perform the same work of getJSON. –  Crescent Fresh Nov 16 '09 at 3:26
    
There's no good reason to be synchronous rather than async. Just put the code into the callback. –  Nosredna Nov 16 '09 at 3:29
    
Woops, I meant async, not asynch. Another option that comes to mind is to set a "global" override via $.ajaxSettings.async = false. Note that this affects all XMLHttpRequests. –  Crescent Fresh Nov 16 '09 at 3:29
1  
I didn't mean always, @strager, I meant in JavaScript Ajax programs. $document ready is meant for setting up things like click handlers. Doing stuff sync instead of async in JavaScript is a bad idea because JS is single threaded and the thread can't end. The interface gums up and some browsers will throw up alerts about the script not ending. Since the goal of learning Ajax is usually to create responsive web pages or RIAs (not command line apps), async is what's needed to be learned. –  Nosredna Nov 16 '09 at 3:48

Remember that when you supply a callback function, the point of that is to defer the execution of that callback until later and immediately continue execution of whatever is next. This is necessary because of the single-threaded execution model of JavaScript in the browser. Forcing synchronous execution is possible, but it hangs the browser for the entire duration of the operation. In the case of something like $.getJSON, that is a prohibitively long time for the browser to stop responding.

In other words, you're trying to find a way to use this procedural paradigm:

var foo = {};

$.getJSON("url", function(data) {
  foo = data.property;
});

// Use foo here.

When you need to refactor your code so that it flows more like this:

$.getJSON("url", function(data) {
  // Do something with data.property here.
});

"Do something" could be a call to another function if you want to keep the callback function simple. The important part is that you're waiting until $.getJSON finishes before executing the code.

You could even use custom events so that the code you had placed after $.getJSON subscribes to an IssuesReceived event and you raise that event in the $.getJSON callback:

$(document).ready(function() {
  $(document).bind('IssuesReceived', IssuesReceived)

  $.getJSON("url", function(data) {
    $(document).trigger('IssuesReceived', data);
  });
});

function IssuesReceived(evt, data) {
  // Do something with data here.
}

Update:

Or, you could store the data globally and just use the custom event for notification that the data had been received and the global variable updated.

$(document).ready(function() {
  $(document).bind('IssuesReceived', IssuesReceived)

  $.getJSON("url", function(data) {
    // I prefer the window.data syntax so that it's obvious
    //  that the variable is global.
    window.data = data;

    $(document).trigger('IssuesReceived');
  });
});

function IssuesReceived(evt) {
  // Do something with window.data here.
  //  (e.g. create the drag 'n drop interface)
}

// Wired up as the "drop" callback handler on 
//  your drag 'n drop UI.
function OnDrop(evt) {
  // Modify window.data accordingly.
}

// Maybe wired up as the click handler for a
//  "Save changes" button.
function SaveChanges() {
  $.post("SaveUrl", window.data);
}

Update 2:

In response to this:

Does anyone have an idea how I should be blocking user interaction while this is going on? Why is it such a concern? Thanks again for all the responses.

The reason that you should avoid blocking the browser with synchronous AJAX calls is that a blocked JavaScript thread blocks everything else in the browser too, including other tabs and even other windows. That means no scrolling, no navigation, no nothing. For all intents and purposes, it appears as though the browser has crashed. As you can imagine, a page that behaves this way is a significant nuisance to its users.

share|improve this answer
    
I never think to use custom events. I shall endeavor to do so. Great answer. –  Nosredna Nov 16 '09 at 4:11
    
Thanks for the answer Dave. So I want run a scenario by you. Let's say, within the $.getJSON callback, I take the data that I get from the call, and load a jquery drag drop list that the user can then remove Issues from if he chooses. The user doesn't want a particular Issue assigned to him, and "drops" it. Then he wants to save that list that is assigned to him. Here I want to update that information, and a JSON object would be perfect. But I no longer have access to that info because the callback has finished executing. I don't have a list to remove an Issue from! How should I handle this? –  Matt Powell Nov 16 '09 at 4:16
    
@Nosredna: Custom events are very underused, IMO. They're great for cleaning up the nested anonymous function spaghetti that inline event handlers tend to produce. –  Dave Ward Nov 16 '09 at 4:19
    
Dave, I think your answer may violate my original issue with asynchronous calling. A global variable seems like a good solution, but only if I can ensure that it is called after the $.getJSON runs. If I need to be able to manipulate the data after the callback completes, it sounds like the only I can store that data is in a variable outside of the scope of the callback (and within the scope I need it). And the only way to ensure that the variable's values are set it to set ajax to sync. Good conclusion? –  Matt Powell Nov 16 '09 at 4:27
1  
@Matt: Take a look at my recent edits, including the OnDrop and SaveChanges functions, and see if that makes sense. With event-driven code, the idea is to act on these events as necessary, not to orchestrate a certain chain of code to execute all in synchronous order. Anything else is going against the grain when you're working in the single-threaded browser environment; especially when using an event-driven framework like jQuery. –  Dave Ward Nov 16 '09 at 4:36

maybe this work, works to me.. :)

$variable= new array();

$.getJSON("url", function(data){
asignVariable(data);
}

function asignVariable(data){
$variable = data;
}

console.log($variable);

Hope it help you.. :)

share|improve this answer

"But this is done via subsequent interactions on the page, and I cannot foresee what the user will want to do with the JSON object within the callback."

The callback is your opportunity to set the screen up for the user's interaction with the data.

You can create or reveal HTML for the user, and set up more callbacks.

Most of the time, none of your code will be running. Programming an Ajax page is all about thinking about which events might happen when.

There's a reason it's "Ajax" and not "Sjax." There's a reason it's a pain to change from async to sync. It's expected you'll do the page async.

Event-driven programming can be frustrating at first.

I've done computationally intensive financial algorithms in JS. Even then, it's the same thing--you break it up into little parts, and the events are timeouts.

Animation in JavaScript is also event driven. In fact, the browser won't even show the movement unless your script relinquishes control repeatedly.

share|improve this answer
    
You've convinced me that sync ajax is not the way to go, but I'm still struggling with flow then. See my follow-up comment to Dave Ward's answer. –  Matt Powell Nov 16 '09 at 4:18

You could approach this with promises:

var jsonPromise = $.getJSON("url")

jsonPromise.done(function(data) {
    // success
    // do stuff with data
});

jsonPromise.fail(function(reason) {
    // it failed... handle it
});

// other stuff ....

jsonPromise.then(function(data) {
    // do moar stuff with data
    // will perhaps fire instantly, since the deferred may already be resolved.
});

It is pretty straight forward and a viable way to make async code feel more imperative.

share|improve this answer

You are just running into scoping issues.

Short answer:

window.jsonIssues = {};  // or tack on to some other accessible var

$.getJSON("url", function(data) {
    window.jsonIssues = data.Issues;
});

// see results here
alert(window.jsonIssues);

Long answers:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/327454/scoping-issue-in-javascript http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1046332/javascript-closure-scoping-issue

share|improve this answer
1  
Unless I'm misinterpreting your short answer, using "window." in front of the variables is not working. Were you just trying to make a scoping point? –  Matt Powell Nov 16 '09 at 3:09
3  
No, this is not a scoping issue, this is an asynchronous issue. Tacking on window. in front of everything by no means makes an asynchronous operation synchronous. Did you event read the question? –  Crescent Fresh Nov 16 '09 at 3:22
    
@megamatt: you're correct, there was an extraneous 'var' in there; @crescent: the original question wasn't asking anything about async, only the edits after I posted added specific async points. –  johnvey Nov 18 '09 at 8:08

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