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The following code crashes C++ with a runtime error:

#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main() {
    string s = "aa";
    for (int i = 0; i < s.length() - 3; i++) {

    }
}

While this code does not crash:

#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main() {
    string s = "aa";
    int len = s.length() - 3;
    for (int i = 0; i < len; i++) {

    }
}

I just don't have any idea how to explain it. What could be the reason for this behavior?

share|improve this question
20  
You should be getting a compiler warning about a signed/unsigned integer mismatch... –  Cody Gray Jul 1 '13 at 7:01
7  
To understand the problem, try a cout << s.length() - 3 << endl;. Then, enable compiler warnings at their highest level... –  gx_ Jul 1 '13 at 7:04
6  
Can you explain how it was crashing though? seeing the answers I can understand an infinite loop, but not a crash –  Akash Jul 1 '13 at 12:10
3  
What compiler are you using, because using the g++ compiler both seem to run without error for me? –  Sabashan Ragavan Jul 1 '13 at 14:26
2  
@Akash it's undefined behaviour. Some machines 'wrap around' the unsigned part; others do not. –  TheBlueCat Jul 1 '13 at 14:30
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7 Answers

up vote 83 down vote accepted

s.length() is unsigned integer type. When you subtract 3, you make it negative. For an unsigned, it means very big.

A workaround (valid as long the string is long up to INT_MAX) would be to do like this:

#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main() {

    string s = "aa";

    for (int i = 0; i < static_cast<int> (s.length() ) - 3; i++) {

    }
}

Which would never enter the loop.

A very important detail is that you have probably received a warning "comparing signed and unsigned value". The problem is that if you ignore those warnings, you enter the very dangerous field of implicit "integer conversion"(*), which has a defined behaviour, but it is difficult to follow: the best is to never ignore those compiler warnings.


(*) You might also be interested to know about "integer promotion".

share|improve this answer
6  
It is a workaround in this particular case, but a poor one generally. If the length of your string is larger than the maximum value representable by a signed integer, your cast risks undefined behavior. –  Cody Gray Jul 1 '13 at 7:22
4  
This is one of the most bizarre explanations i ever heard... –  SChepurin Jul 1 '13 at 8:53
4  
@Antonio This behavior is not called "integer promotion" but "integral conversion". "Integral promtions" happen when char, short and bitfields are implicitly promoted to the wider type int. –  TemplateRex Jul 1 '13 at 11:00
4  
“It is a workaround in this particular case, but a poor one generally”, I disagree that this is poor generally. How often do you expect to have strings with length greater than 2 billion characters? Sure, be aware that you may get truncation, but the alternatives to this sort of solution are often way more complex and often, this is fine. –  mxcl Jul 1 '13 at 12:07
4  
Wow 57 upvotes (so far) for a solution that uses a cast instead of just using the right types? No offense, this will work, but imho this isn't the right way of doing it. I'm just impressed on how popular this answer seems to be. –  stefan Jul 1 '13 at 21:23
show 19 more comments

First of all: why does it crash? Let's step through your program like a debugger would.

Note: I'll assume that your loop body isn't empty, but accesses the string. If this isn't the case, the cause of the crash is undefined behaviour through integer overflow. See Richard Hansens answer for that.

std::string s = "aa";//assign the two-character string "aa" to variable s of type std::string
for ( int i = 0; // create a variable i of type int with initial value 0 
i < s.length() - 3 // call s.length(), subtract 3, compare the result with i. OK!
{...} // execute loop body
i++ // do the incrementing part of the loop, i now holds value 1!
i < s.length() - 3 // call s.length(), subtract 3, compare the result with i. OK!
{...} // execute loop body
i++ // do the incrementing part of the loop, i now holds value 2!
i < s.length() - 3 // call s.length(), subtract 3, compare the result with i. OK!
{...} // execute loop body
i++ // do the incrementing part of the loop, i now holds value 3!
.
.

We would expect the check i < s.length() - 3 to fail right away, since the length of s is two (we only every given it a length at the beginning and never changed it) and 2 - 3 is -1, 0 < -1 is false. However we do get an "OK" here.

This is because s.length() isn't 2. It's 2u. std::string::length() has return type size_t which is an unsigned integer. So going back to the loop condition, we first get the value of s.length(), so 2u, now subtract 3. 3 is an integer literal and interpreted by the compiler as type int. So the compiler has to calculate 2u - 3, two values of different types. Operations on primitive types only work for same types, so one has to be converted into the other. There are some strict rules, in this case, unsigned "wins", so 3 get's converted to 3u. In unsigned integers, 2u - 3u can't be -1u as such a number does not exists (well, because it has a sign of course!). Instead it calculates every operation modulo 2^(n_bits), where n_bits is the number of bits in this type (usually 8, 16, 32 or 64). So instead of -1 we get 4294967295u (assuming 32bit).

So now the compiler is done with s.length() - 3 (of course it's much much faster than me ;-) ), now let's go for the comparison: i < s.length() - 3. Putting in the values: 0 < 4294967295u. Again, different types, 0 becomes 0u, the comparison 0u < 4294967295u is obviously true, the loop condition is positively checked, we can now execute the loop body.

After incrementing, the only thing that changes in the above is the value of i. The value of i will again be converted into an unsigned int, as the comparison needs it.

So we have

(0u < 4294967295u) == true, let's do the loop body!
(1u < 4294967295u) == true, let's do the loop body!
(2u < 4294967295u) == true, let's do the loop body!

Here's the problem: What do you do in the loop body? Presumably you access the i^th character of your string, don't you? Even though it wasn't your intention, you didn't only accessed the zeroth and first, but also the second! The second doesn't exists (as your string only has two characters, the zeroth and first), you access memory you shouldn't, the program does whatever it wants (undefined behaviour). Note that the program isn't required to crash immediately. It can seem to work fine for another half an hour, so these mistakes are hard to catch. But it's always dangerous to access memory beyond the bounds, this is where most crashes come from.

So in summary, you get a different value from s.length() - 3 from that what you'd expect, this results in a positive loop condition check, that leads to repetitive execution of the loop body, which in itself accesses memory it shouldn't.

Now let's see how to avoid that, i.e. how to tell the compiler what you actually meant in your loop condition.


Lengths of strings and sizes of containers are inherently unsigned so you should use an unsigned integer in for loops.

Since unsigned int is fairly long and therefore undesirable to write over and over again in loops, just use size_t. This is the type every container in the STL uses for storing length or size. You may need to include cstddef to assert platform independence.

#include <cstddef>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main() {

    string s = "aa";

    for ( size_t i = 0; i + 3 < s.length(); i++) {
    //    ^^^^^^         ^^^^
    }
}

Since a < b - 3 is mathematically equivalent to a + 3 < b, we can interchange them. However, a + 3 < b prevents b - 3 to be a huge value. Recall that s.length() returns an unsigned integer and unsigned integers perform operations module 2^(bits) where bits is the number of bits in the type (usually 8, 16, 32 or 64). Therefore with s.length() == 2, s.length() - 3 == -1 == 2^(bits) - 1.


Alternatively, if you want to use i < s.length() - 3 for personal preference, you have to add a condition:

for ( size_t i = 0; (s.length() > 3) && (i < s.length() - 3); ++i )
//    ^             ^                    ^- your actual condition
//    ^             ^- check if the string is long enough
//    ^- still prefer unsigned types!
share|improve this answer
    
@MichaelKjörling Nope this is impossible. i starts with 0 and goes up. So at i == INT_MAX - 4, it holds that i + 3 == s.length(). Therefore the condition is broken and the loops ends. No possibility of failure whatsoever. Be careful if the incrementation is not i++. If this is e.g. i *= 2, the condition should be changed. For looping with i++, this simply can't fail. Note that the starting point must be small enough too. So for ( size_t i = std::numeric_limits<size_t>::max() - 1; i + 3 < n; ++i ) would not do the intended thing, but starting from 0 always works. –  stefan Jul 1 '13 at 9:41
    
Ahh, you are correct. It's scary territory when you start getting close to INT_MAX and friends. –  Michael Kjörling Jul 1 '13 at 9:43
    
Why would you need unsigned int? I prefer just for (unsigned i =..., which is nicely readable and equivalent. — size_t is good because it's the same type as std::vector::length(), but totally misses the intention. –  leftaroundabout Jul 1 '13 at 12:37
1  
That doesn't make sense to me. If you want to be clear, size_t is hardly a good choice – it's conceptually weird to be iterating over a size, when actually the container size stays fixed. size_t is concise, and correct, yes – but not as clear as unsigned. –  leftaroundabout Jul 2 '13 at 0:53
1  
@leftaroundabout You're not iterating over a size, you're iterating over an array (or vector, or container, whatever) which has a size. So it conceptually makes perfect sense. I guess it is up to interpretation. –  Thomas Jul 2 '13 at 12:30
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Actually, in the first version you loop for a very long time, as you compare i to an unsigned integer containing a very large number. The size of a string is (in effect) the same as size_t which is an unsigned integer. When you subtract the 3 from that value it underflows and goes on to be a big value.

In the second version of the code, you assign this unsigned value to a signed variable, and so you get the correct value.

And it's not actually the condition or the value that causes the crash, it's most likely that you index the string out of bounds, a case of undefined behavior.

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2  
Are you sure the first loop is just very long, and not infinite? Can an int ever reach std::numeric_limits<unsigned int>::max() ? What will happen when i reach is boundary? Answering my self, probably it will become negative and in integer promotion it will really become bigger/the same value of the right part of the expression. Difficult case though! :) –  Antonio Jul 1 '13 at 7:12
1  
As far as the comparison goes, the type of i doesn't really matter; even without knowing the rules of promotion (which in this case will make i unsigned), you can reason that you're comparing two bit representations, and the less than condition will fail when i is the maximum representable value. The fact that as an int it is signed isn't relevant for that comparison. –  sapi Jul 1 '13 at 8:16
5  
Over/underflow of unsigned types is actually well-defined. See: stackoverflow.com/q/988588/1030702, stackoverflow.com/a/2760612/1030702, the C/C++ standards. It's undefined for signed types, though popular compilers (VC++, GCC) do the same thing nowadays - still not good to rely on it. –  Bob Jul 1 '13 at 12:46
    
"it's most likely that you index the string out of bounds, a case of undefined behavior" -- where in the original code is a string being indexed? –  Richard Hansen Jul 2 '13 at 22:05
    
@RichardHansen In the code the OP doesn't show. If you have a string, and uses the string length in a loop condition, it's very likely that you will use the iterator value as index in that string in the loop. Of course I'm not sure, that's why I said that it's likely. –  Joachim Pileborg Jul 3 '13 at 5:40
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Assuming you left out important code in the for loop

Most people here seem unable to reproduce the crash—myself included—and it looks like the other answers here are based on the assumption that you left out some important code in the body of the for loop, and that the missing code is what is causing your crash.

If you are using i to access memory (presumably characters in the string) in the body of the for loop, and you left that code out of your question in an attempt to provide a minimal example, then the crash is easily explained by the fact that s.length() - 3 has the value SIZE_MAX due to modular arithmetic on unsigned integer types. SIZE_MAX is a very big number, so i will keep getting bigger until it is used to access an address that triggers a segfault.

However, your code could theoretically crash as-is, even if the body of the for loop is empty. I am unaware of any implementations that would crash, but maybe your compiler and CPU are exotic.

The following explanation does not assume that you left out code in your question. It takes on faith that the code you posted in your question crashes as-is; that it isn't an abbreviated stand-in for some other code that crashes.

Why your first program crashes

Your first program crashes because that is its reaction to undefined behavior in your code. (When I try running your code, it terminates without crashing because that is my implementation's reaction to the undefined behavior.)

The undefined behavior comes from overflowing an int. The C++11 standard says (in [expr] clause 5 paragraph 4):

If during the evaluation of an expression, the result is not mathematically defined or not in the range of representable values for its type, the behavior is undefined.

In your example program, s.length() returns a size_t with value 2. Subtracting 3 from that would yield negative 1, except size_t is an unsigned integer type. The C++11 standard says (in [basic.fundamental] clause 3.9.1 paragraph 4):

Unsigned integers, declared unsigned, shall obey the laws of arithmetic modulo 2n where n is the number of bits in the value representation of that particular size of integer.46

46) This implies that unsigned arithmetic does not overflow because a result that cannot be represented by the resulting unsigned integer type is reduced modulo the number that is one greater than the largest value that can be represented by the resulting unsigned integer type.

This means that the result of s.length() - 3 is a size_t with value SIZE_MAX. This is a very big number, bigger than INT_MAX (the largest value representable by int).

Because s.length() - 3 is so big, execution spins in the loop until i gets to INT_MAX. On the very next iteration, when it tries to increment i, the result would be INT_MAX + 1 but that is not in the range of representable values for int. Thus, the behavior is undefined. In your case, the behavior is to crash.

On my system, my implementation's behavior when i is incremented past INT_MAX is to wrap (set i to INT_MIN) and keep going. Once i reaches -1, the usual arithmetic conversions (C++ [expr] clause 5 paragraph 9) cause i to equal SIZE_MAX so the loop terminates.

Either reaction is appropriate. That is the problem with undefined behavior—it might work as you intend, it might crash, it might format your hard drive, or it might cancel Firefly. You never know.

How your second program avoids the crash

As with the first program, s.length() - 3 is a size_t type with value SIZE_MAX. However, this time the value is being assigned to an int. The C++11 standard says (in [conv.integral] clause 4.7 paragraph 3):

If the destination type is signed, the value is unchanged if it can be represented in the destination type (and bit-field width); otherwise, the value is implementation-defined.

The value SIZE_MAX is too big to be representable by an int, so len gets an implementation-defined value (probably -1, but maybe not). The condition i < len will eventually be true regardless of the value assigned to len, so your program will terminate without encountering any undefined behavior.

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The program invokes UB probably a long time before i reaches INT_MAX, namely once the i^th character is accessed in the loop body for i > 1 . If the loop is empty or the characters are untouched, your explanation holds. –  stefan Jul 3 '13 at 7:50
    
@stefan: You may be right, but I don't like assuming that there is missing code in the OP's question. To me, the question strongly indicated that the code was crashing as-is; that the code isn't an abbreviated stand-in for some other code that crashes. I updated my answer to make my interpretation of the question clear. –  Richard Hansen Jul 3 '13 at 15:31
1  
The assumption that code inside {} that was not posted causes the crash is very reasonable, though. While "program invokes UB" and "UB can be anything, including a crash" is technically of course correct, in practice it is utter nonsense. An overflowing integer does not produce a crash. There's trapping floating-point math, yes, but there's no such thing as "integer overflow trap" on any real CPU. However, for example using string::operator[] with a negative index may very well produce a crash (or string::at may throw) which is a very real thing to happen, not only in theory. –  Damon Jul 3 '13 at 16:15
    
@Damon: Fair point. I updated my answer to include the "missing code" case. –  Richard Hansen Jul 3 '13 at 16:52
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The type of s.length() is size_t with a value of 2, therefore s.length() - 3 is also an unsigned type size_t and it has a value of SIZE_MAX which is implementation defined (which is 18446744073709551615 if its size is 64 bit). It is at least 32 bit type (can be 64 bit in 64 bit platforms) and this high number means an indefinite loop. In order to prevent this problem you can simply cast s.length() to int:

for (int i = 0; i < (int)s.length() - 3; i++)
{
          //..some code causing crash
}

In the second case len is -1 because it is a signed integer and it does not enter the loop.

When it comes to crashing, this "infinite" loop is not the direct cause of the crash. If you share the code within the loop you can get further explanation.

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but the question was about crashing -- nothing was ever said about an infinite loop –  Richard Hansen Jul 2 '13 at 22:06
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Since s.length() is unsigned type quantity, when you do s.length()-3, it becomes negative and negative values are stored as large positive values (due to unsigned conversion specifications) and the loop goes infinite and hence it crashes.

To make it work, you must typecast the s.length() as :

static_cast < int > (s.length())

share|improve this answer
    
Why would going in an infinite loop make the program crash? –  Richard Hansen Jul 2 '13 at 22:10
    
There is no recursive function call in the OP's question so there's no way the stack would grow. –  Richard Hansen Jul 3 '13 at 16:23
    
cause of crash is due to integer overflow –  shek8034 Jul 5 '13 at 15:29
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The problem you are having arises from the following statement:

i < s.length() - 3

The result of s.length() is of the unsigned size_t type. If you imagine the binary representation of two:

0...010

And you then substitute three from this, you are effectively taking off 1 three times, that is:

0...001

0...000

But then you have a problem, removing the third digit it underflows, as it attempts to get another digit from the left:

1...111

This is what happens no matter if you have an unsigned or signed type, however the difference is the signed type uses the Most Significant Bit (or MSB) to represent if the number is negative or not. When the undeflow occurs it simply represents a negative for the signed type.

On the other hand, size_t is unsigned. When it underflows it will now represent the highest number size_t can possibly represent. Thus the loop is practically infinite (Depending on your computer, as this effects the maximum of size_t).

In order to fix this problem, you can manipulate the code you have in a few different ways:

int main() {
    string s = "aa";
    for (size_t i = 3; i < s.length(); i++) {

    }
}

or

int main() {
    string s = "aa";
    for (size_t i = 0; i + 3 < s.length(); i++) {

    }
}

or even:

int main() {
    string s = "aa";
    for(size_t i = s.length(); i > 3; --i) {

    }
}

The important things to note is that the substitution has been omitted and instead addition has been used elsewhere with the same logical evaluations. Both the first and last ones change the value of i that is available inside the for loop whereas the second will keep it the same.

I was tempted to provide this as an example of code:

int main() {
    string s = "aa";
    for(size_t i = s.length(); --i > 2;) {

    }
}

After some thought I realised this was a bad idea. Readers' exercise is to work out why!

share|improve this answer
    
size_t i instead. –  Korchkidu Jul 1 '13 at 13:25
    
@Korchkidu Thanks, not being a heavy C++ programmer, I didn't know the correct type to use there so I went cautiously for an int. –  meiamsome Jul 1 '13 at 13:33
    
A much better solution than casting. –  thomasfedb Jul 1 '13 at 15:56
    
@thomasfedb Apart that the value i is not anymore the one the user desired... Are you going to replace in the cycle all istances of i with i-3? –  Antonio Jul 1 '13 at 21:24
    
the question was about why the code crashes, not about how to avoid casts –  Richard Hansen Jul 2 '13 at 22:08
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