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And when would you use one rather than the other?

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2  
Here is one good blog on the same awaxman11.github.io/blog/2013/08/05/… –  Arup Rakshit Dec 1 '13 at 10:05
    
Here is more detailed answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/626/… –  Dan Feb 23 '14 at 1:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 158 down vote accepted

One difference is in the way they handle arguments. Creating a proc using proc {} and Proc.new {} are equivalent. However, using lambda {} gives you a proc that checks the number of arguments passed to it. From ri Kernel#lambda:

Equivalent to Proc.new, except the resulting Proc objects check the number of parameters passed when called.

An example:

p = Proc.new {|a, b| puts a**2+b**2 } # => #<Proc:0x3c7d28@(irb):1>
p.call 1, 2 # => 5
p.call 1 # => NoMethodError: undefined method `**' for nil:NilClass
p.call 1, 2, 3 # => 5
l = lambda {|a, b| puts a**2+b**2 } # => #<Proc:0x15016c@(irb):5 (lambda)>
l.call 1, 2 # => 5
l.call 1 # => ArgumentError: wrong number of arguments (1 for 2)
l.call 1, 2, 3 # => ArgumentError: wrong number of arguments (3 for 2)

In addition, as Ken points out, using return inside a lambda returns the value of that lambda, but using return in a proc returns from the enclosing block.

lambda { return :foo }.call # => :foo
return # => LocalJumpError: unexpected return
Proc.new { return :foo }.call # => LocalJumpError: unexpected return

So for most quick uses they're the same, but if you want automatic strict argument checking (which can also sometimes help with debugging), or if you need to use the return statement to return the value of the proc, use lambda.

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8  
+1 For the sample code –  OscarRyz Nov 16 '09 at 4:49
1  
Would it accurate to say that lambdas are very much like methods (check arguments and return will return from them) while procs are very much like blocks (arguments are not checked and a return will return from the containing method or lambda)? –  pedz May 4 '14 at 17:28

In addition to jtbandes's answer, there's also a difference in what the return statement returns from in proc versus lambda.

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Good point. I added this to my answer. –  jtbandes Nov 16 '09 at 4:57
1  
I also can't wait for something equivalent to "Ruby 3000" to fix this. This distinction is way too subtle. –  tadman Nov 16 '09 at 16:06

The real difference between procs and lambdas has everything to do with control flow keywords. I am talking about return, raise, break, redo, retry etc. – those control words. Let's say you have a return statement in a proc. When you call your proc, it will not only dump you out of it, but will also return from the enclosing method e.g.:

def my_method
  puts "before proc"
  my_proc = Proc.new do
    puts "inside proc"
    return
  end
  my_proc.call
  puts "after proc"
end

my_method

shoaib@shoaib-ubuntu-vm:~/tmp$ ruby a.rb
before proc
inside proc

The final puts in the method, was never executed, since when we called our proc, the return within it dumped us out of the method. If, however, we convert our proc to a lambda, we get the following:

def my_method
  puts "before proc"
  my_proc = lambda do
    puts "inside proc"
    return
  end
  my_proc.call
  puts "after proc"
end

my_method
shoaib@shoaib-ubuntu-vm:~/tmp$ ruby a.rb
before proc
inside proc
after proc

The return within the lambda only dumps us out of the lambda itself and the enclosing method continues executing. The way control flow keywords are treated within procs and lambdas is the main difference between them

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1  
one of the most brilliant explanations I've seen so far, I wish I could +10 it –  Andrey Deineko Mar 31 at 11:54
    
Thanks a lot @Andrey Deineko –  shoaib Jun 29 at 7:11

It's somewhat subtle. They're both methods that create closures, and both return Proc objects. There's actually a third way as well — Proc.new. The difference is in how they behave, and the specifics depend on whether you're using Ruby 1.8 or 1.9 (in fact, there's yet another way to create them in Ruby 1.9). In the general case, the difference isn't something you need to worry about. Only when you're concerned about strictness does it make a difference. When to use lambda, when to use Proc.new? covers the differences pretty well.

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