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I am working through Caleb Doxsey's Go book and I have two questions about fmt.Scanf http://www.golang-book.com/4

I am wondering why the program does not stop after the second Scanf and wait for user input? And how do I test if the user entered an integer and/or did not leave blank?

package main

import (
"fmt"
//"math"
)


// compute square roots by using Newton's method

func main() {

var x float64           //number to take square root
var y float64           //this is the guess
var q float64           //this is the quotient
var a float64           //this is the average


// how do check if the user entered a number
fmt.Print("Enter a number to take its square root: ")
var inputSquare float64
fmt.Scanf("%f", &inputSquare)

// why doesn't program stop after 
// the Print statement and wait
// for user input?
fmt.Print("Enter first guess ")
var inputGuess float64
fmt.Scanf("%f", &inputGuess)

//x = 2
x = inputSquare
y = inputGuess

for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {   //set up the for loop for iterations
    q = x/y                 //compute the quotient; x and y are given
    a = (q + y) / x         //compute the average       
    y = a                   //set the guess to the average              
}                           //for the next loop


fmt.Println("y --> ", y)
//fmt.Println("Sqrt(2)", math.Sqrt(2))
}
share|improve this question
1  
It works properly for me. I'm going to guess that it's a line ending issue. If you're running on Windows, line endings are conventionally denoted by '\r\n', whereas on Mac OS X and Linux (where I tested this), it's just '\n'. My guess is that maybe Go is reading the '\r' , treating it as a line ending, and leaving the '\n' on the stream. So when you call fmt.Scanf again, there's already something in the buffer and no need to block. This is just a wild guess though. –  deong Jul 1 '13 at 10:28
    
ok. Any suggestions how to fix it? This is what I get running in Windows command line: c:\Go\src\play\exercise>go run loop_exercise.go Enter a number to take its square root: 2 Enter first guess y --> +Inf –  Zeynel Jul 1 '13 at 11:11
1  
What happens if you explicitly read a newline character with the Scanf call? Like "fmt.Scanf("%f\n", &inputGuess)"? Alternately, you could flush stdin after each read. I don't know go well enough to know where to tell you to look for a Flush function. –  deong Jul 1 '13 at 11:36
    
Yes, adding \n fixed the issue. –  Zeynel Jul 1 '13 at 22:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It's Issue 5391: fmt: Scanf rejects \r\n at end of line on Windows.

As a workaround and to check for valid input, write,

var inputSquare float64
n, err := fmt.Scanf("%f\n", &inputSquare)
if err != nil || n != 1 {
    // handle invalid input
    fmt.Println(n, err)
}

and

var inputGuess float64
n, err = fmt.Scanf("%f\n", &inputGuess)
if err != nil || n != 1 {
    // handle invalid input
    fmt.Println(n, err)
}

The workaround is the newline in the "%f\n" format strings.

Package fmt

func Scanf

func Scanf(format string, a ...interface{}) (n int, err error)

Scanf scans text read from standard input, storing successive space-separated values into successive arguments as determined by the format. It returns the number of items successfully scanned.

Here's a complete working program:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

// compute square roots by using Newton's method
func main() {
    var x float64 //number to take square root
    var y float64 //this is the guess
    var q float64 //this is the quotient
    var a float64 //this is the average

    fmt.Print("Enter a number to take its square root: ")
    var inputSquare float64
    n, err := fmt.Scanf("%f\n", &inputSquare)
    if err != nil || n != 1 {
        // handle invalid input
        fmt.Println(n, err)
        return
    }

    fmt.Print("Enter first guess ")
    var inputGuess float64
    n, err = fmt.Scanf("%f\n", &inputGuess)
    if err != nil || n != 1 {
        // handle invalid input
        fmt.Println(n, err)
        return
    }

    x = inputSquare
    y = inputGuess
    for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {
        q = x / y       // compute the quotient; x and y are given
        a = (q + y) / x // compute the average
        y = a           // set the guess to the average
    }
    fmt.Printf("sqrt(%g) = %g\n", x, y)
}

Output:

Enter a number to take its square root: 2.0
Enter first guess 1.0
sqrt(2) = 1.414213562373095

I used Go 1.1.1 on Windows 7:

C:\>go version
go version go1.1.1 windows/amd64  
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Does fmt.Scanf() return an error? I assume, n is the input and err is the possible error message in n, err := fmt.Scanf("%f\n", &inputSquare)Is this correct? –  Zeynel Jul 1 '13 at 22:39
1  
See my revised answer. n is the number of items successfully scanned and err reports any errors encountered during the scan. Therefore, if there was an error or the number of items scanned isn't what you expect (err != nil || n != 1), do something to handle the error. However, if all goes well (err == nil && n == 1), the valid input, as a floating-point number (float64), can be read from *inputSquare. In your code, you discarded n and err, that's why you didn't notice errors. –  peterSO Jul 1 '13 at 23:31
    
I must be doing something wrong. If I run the program with the error handling part n, err := fmt.Scanf("f\n", &inputSquare) // pick up the error if err != nil || n != 1 { fmt.Println(n, err) I get "0 input does not match format" (I enter, for instance, 2.0 for inputSquare) If I comment out the error handling it all works fine! What am I doing wrong? –  Zeynel Jul 2 '13 at 1:02
1  
I've revised my answer to provide a complete working program. What output do you get when you run the program? –  peterSO Jul 2 '13 at 1:45

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