Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am a little bit confused, about what is happening, in the python interpreter for these code snippets... I am using 32 bit version of python 2.7.3

class A:
    def func(self):
        print 'in func'


>>> A.func
>>> <unbound method A.f>
>>> A.__dict__['func']
>>> <function func at 0x013DF9B0>
>>> a = A()
>>> a.func
>>> <bound method A.func of <__main__.A instance at 0x014076C0>>

Till here everything is ok... But I am confused about the results of the following code snippets... in python 2.7.3

(1)

>>> A.__dict__['func'] is A.func
>>> False
>>> A.func is A.func
>>> False
>>> a.func is A.func
>>> False
>>> a.func is a.func
>>> False

why everything is return False, even though there is only a single class object (A) and single instance of object of class type (a).

(2)

>>> id(A.func)
>>> 20953208
>>> id(A.func)
>>> 20954728
>>> id(A.func)
>>> 20960080

(3)

>>> id(a.func)
>>> 20954288
>>> id(a.func)
>>> 20952888
>>> id(a.func)
>>> 20954728 

for (2) and (3) why it is changing the id again and again... is this function is not stored at a specified memory location.

But the same code for block (1) gives this result in 32 bit version of python 3.3.1

>>> A.__dict__['func'] is A.func
>>> True
>>> A.func is A.func
>>> False
>>> a.func is A.func
>>> False
>>> a.func is a.func
>>> False

Can anyone tell me details of, how these results are coming different for different versions of python, and why it is coming different in same version of python also...

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you need to compare the underlying function. the method is not the function.

>>> A.func.__func__ is A.func.__func__
True

this is because python adds a wrapper around functions (and appears not to cache them - a new one is generated each time the method is requested) to do the extra magic needed to make self work right in methods. i am trying to remember what this is called. part of the explanation is at http://docs.python.org/2.6/reference/datamodel.html (scroll down to "User-defined methods"), but i'm sure there's a better explanation somewhere.

extra fragments at http://docs.python.org/2.6/tutorial/classes.html#method-objects http://docs.python.org/2.6/c-api/method.html#method-objects and http://docs.python.org/2.6/library/stdtypes.html#methods

hopefully someone who knows more than me will post (i am replying because this is quite old and i thought i could point you in the right general direction).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.