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I've started playing around with an attempt to create the following:

public static IEnumerable<List<T>> OptimizedBatches<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items)

Then the client of this extension method would use it like this:

foreach (var list in extracter.EnumerateAll().OptimizedBatches()) 
{
   // at some unknown batch size, process time starts to 
   // increase at an exponential rate
}

Here's an example:

batch length         time
    1                 100ms
    2                 102ms
    4                 110ms
    8                 111ms
    16                118ms
    32                119ms
    64                134ms
    128               500ms <-- doubled length but time it took more than doubled
    256               1100ms <-- oh no!!

From the above, the best batch length is 64 because 64/134 is the best ratio of length/time.

So the question is what algorithm to use to automatically pick the optimal batch length based on the successive times between iterator steps?

Here's what I have so far - it's not done yet...

class LengthOptimizer
{
    private Stopwatch sw;
    private int length = 1;
    private List<RateRecord> rateRecords = new List<RateRecord>();

    public int Length
    {
        get
        {
            if (sw == null)
            {
                length = 1;
                sw = new Stopwatch();
            }
            else
            {
                sw.Stop();
                rateRecords.Add(new RateRecord { Length = length, ElapsedMilliseconds = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds });
                length = rateRecords.OrderByDescending(c => c.Rate).First().Length;
            }
            sw.Start();
            return length;
        }
    }
}

struct RateRecord
{
    public int Length { get; set; }
    public long ElapsedMilliseconds { get; set; }
    public float Rate { get { return ((float)Length) / ElapsedMilliseconds; } }
}
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1  
Could you expound on what "optimal batch length" means to your problem? –  Romoku Jul 1 '13 at 11:14
    
I'm trying to get the best ratio of Length/Time –  Aaron Anodide Jul 1 '13 at 11:15
    
Are you optimizing for length or time? –  Romoku Jul 1 '13 at 11:20
    
i want to get the largest batch size that doesn't cause the rate of processing items to suffer –  Aaron Anodide Jul 1 '13 at 11:22
    
Is your processing time increasing for the consumer or while yielding the batches? –  Romoku Jul 1 '13 at 11:26

3 Answers 3

The main problem I see here is creating the "optimity scale", that is, why do you consider that 32 -> 119ms is acceptable and 256 -> 1100ms is not; or why certain configuration is better than other one.

Once this is done, the algorithm will be straightforward: just returning the ranking values for each input conditions and making decisions based on "which one gets a higher value".

The first step for creating this scale is finding out the variable which better describes the ideal behaviour you are looking for. A simple first approach: length/time. That is, from your inputs:

batch length           time             ratio1
    1                 100ms              0.01
    2                 102ms              0.019  
    4                 110ms              0.036  
    8                 111ms              0.072
    16                118ms              0.136
    32                119ms              0.269  
    64                134ms              0.478
    128               500ms              0.256
    256               1100ms             0.233

The bigger is ratio1, the better. Logically, it is not the same having 0.269 with 32 length than 0.256 with 128 and thus more information has to be accounted for.

You might create a more complex ranking ratio weighting the two involved variables better (e.g., trying different exponents). But I think that the best approach for this problem is creating a system of "zones" and calculating a generic ranking from it. Example:

Zone 1 -> length from 1 to 8; ideal ratio for this zone = 0.1
Zone 2 -> length from 9 to 32; ideal ratio for this zone = 0.3
Zone 3 -> length from 33 to 64; ideal ratio for this zone = 0.45
Zone 4 -> length from 65 to 256; ideal ratio for this zone = 0.35

The ranking associated to each configuration will be the result of putting the given ratio1 with respect to the ideal value for the given zone.

2      102ms        0.019 -> (zone 1) 0.019/0.1 = 0.19 (or 1.9 in a 0-10 scale)
16     118ms        0.136 -> (zone 2) 0.136/0.3 = 0.45 (or 4.5 in a 0-10 scale)  
etc.

These values might be compared and thus you would automatically know that the second case is much better than the first one.

This is just a simple example but I guess that provides a good enough insight into what is the real problem here: setting up an accurate ranking allowing to perfectly identify which configuration is better.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the help. I am thinking for it to work in real time, maybe I should track the first and second derivative of the ratio. Also, I have to add some kind of heuristic so it doesn't fall into a local solution... and now that I'm thinking about it, if I use a linked list, that will be pretty easy to set up... –  Aaron Anodide Jul 1 '13 at 13:01
    
Sure. This is a pretty simplistic approach, just to give you some initial ideas to work with. –  varocarbas Jul 1 '13 at 13:07

I would go with a ranking approach like varocarbas suggested.

Here is an initial implementation to get you started:

public sealed class DataFlowOptimizer<T>
{
    private readonly IEnumerable<T> _collection;
    private RateRecord bestRate = RateRecord.Default;
    private uint batchLength = 1;

    private struct RateRecord
    {
        public static RateRecord Default = new RateRecord { Length = 1, ElapsedTicks = 0 };
        private float _rate;

        public int Length { get; set; }
        public long ElapsedTicks { get; set; }
        public float Rate
        {
            get
            {
                if(_rate == default(float) && ElapsedTicks > 0)
                {
                    _rate = ((float)Length) / ElapsedTicks;
                }

                return _rate;
            }
        }
    }

    public DataFlowOptimizer(IEnumerable<T> collection)
    {
        _collection = collection;
    }

    public int BatchLength { get { return (int)batchLength; } }
    public float Rate { get { return bestRate.Rate; } }

    public IEnumerable<IList<T>> GetBatch()
    {
        var stopwatch = new Stopwatch();

        var batch = new List<T>();
        var benchmarks = new List<RateRecord>(5);
        IEnumerator<T> enumerator = null;

        try
        {
            enumerator = _collection.GetEnumerator();

            uint count = 0;
            stopwatch.Start();

            while(enumerator.MoveNext())
            {   
                if(count == batchLength)
                {
                    benchmarks.Add(new RateRecord { Length = BatchLength, ElapsedTicks = stopwatch.ElapsedTicks });

                    var currentBatch = batch.ToList();
                    batch.Clear();

                    if(benchmarks.Count == 10)
                    {
                        var currentRate = benchmarks.Average(x => x.Rate);
                        if(currentRate > bestRate.Rate)
                        {
                            bestRate = new RateRecord { Length = BatchLength, ElapsedTicks = (long)benchmarks.Average(x => x.ElapsedTicks) };
                            batchLength = NextPowerOf2(batchLength);
                        }
                        // Set margin of error at 10%
                        else if((bestRate.Rate * .9) > currentRate)
                        {
                            // Shift the current length and make sure it's >= 1
                            var currentPowOf2 = ((batchLength >> 1) | 1);
                            batchLength = PreviousPowerOf2(currentPowOf2);
                        }

                        benchmarks.Clear();
                    }
                    count = 0;
                    stopwatch.Restart();

                    yield return currentBatch;
                }

                batch.Add(enumerator.Current);
                count++;
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            if(enumerator != null)
                enumerator.Dispose();
        }

        stopwatch.Stop();
    }

    uint PreviousPowerOf2(uint x)
    {
        x |= (x >> 1);
        x |= (x >> 2);
        x |= (x >> 4);
        x |= (x >> 8);
        x |= (x >> 16);

        return x - (x >> 1);
    }

    uint NextPowerOf2(uint x)
    {
        x |= (x >> 1);
        x |= (x >> 2);
        x |= (x >> 4);
        x |= (x >> 8);
        x |= (x >> 16);

        return (x+1);
    }
}

Sample program in LinqPad:

public IEnumerable<int> GetData()
{
    return Enumerable.Range(0, 100000000);
}

void Main()
{
    var optimizer = new DataFlowOptimizer<int>(GetData());

    foreach(var batch in optimizer.GetBatch())
    {
        string.Format("Length: {0} Rate {1}", optimizer.BatchLength, optimizer.Rate).Dump();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
cool, thanks for taking the time.. I will try this out and let you know what I end up with –  Aaron Anodide Jul 1 '13 at 13:43
    
It does a benchmark every 10 yields and adjusts the batch length within a 10% margin. Good luck. –  Romoku Jul 1 '13 at 13:46
  1. Describe an objective function f that maps a batch size s and runtime t(s) to a score f(s,t(s))
  2. Try lots of s values and evaluate f(s,t(s)) for each one
  3. Choose the s value that maximizes f
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