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I would like to understand why the following happens:

Datatype Bank

public class Bank {
    String Blz; String Name;

    public String getBlz() {
        return Blz;
    }
    public void setBlz(String Blz) {
        this.Blz = Blz;
    }
    public String getName() {
        return Name;
    }
    public void setName(String Name) {
        this.Name = Name;
    }    
}

This works as expected:

public List<Bank> getSearchResult() {        
        List<Bank> banks = new ArrayList<>();
        Bank bank = new Bank();
        bank.setBlz("1");
        bank.setName("Berlin");
        banks.add(bank);
        bank = new Bank();
        bank.setBlz("8");
        bank.setName("München");
        banks.add(bank);
        return banks;
    }

The list hast as first Element 1 / Berlin and as second 8 / München. But this I don't understand:

public List<Bank> getSearchResult() {            
        List<Bank> banks = new ArrayList<>();
        Bank bank = new Bank();
        bank.setBlz("1");
        bank.setName("Berlin");
        banks.add(bank);
        //bank = new Bank();
        bank.setBlz("8");
        bank.setName("München");
        banks.add(bank);
        return banks;
    }

If I don't create a new Object Bank as shown above, the List contains two times 8 / München. Why does this happen? I don't understand this, because when I add the first Element it contains 1 / Berlin. Then I overwrite the values and add the second.

Thanks

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2  
Because List can have duplication, and since you didn't create a new Object, you're modifying the existing one. Use Set if you don't want. –  Maroun Maroun Jul 1 '13 at 11:28
1  
Because you are adding it twice ? –  Shashank Kadne Jul 1 '13 at 11:28
    
The reuse of local variable bank is confusing. I would use two variables. –  johnchen902 Jul 1 '13 at 11:30
    
Really good question. I never had this problem before because I always create a new object, but it's certainly an interesting question to ask +1 –  JREN Jul 1 '13 at 11:40
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7 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're modifying the existing List. List allows duplication, it won't prevent you to add Objects with the same value twice. To prevent duplicates you can do something like this:

myHashSet = new HashSet<Bank>(bank);

And then:

banks = new List<Bank>(myHashSet);

Set doesn't allow duplication.

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If you don't create a new object then ..

.. you modify the existing (same) object.

Java does not copy/clone/duplicate objects automatically (i.e. on assignment or when passed to a method).

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In the second example, the list is referring to the same object. Because you have constructed the bank object twice in the first example (ie. you have called the constructor), there are two instances.

In the fiest example, after the bank was added to the list, the bank variable can be assigned (ie. pointed) to something else. So in the first example the bank gets something else.

Lists just point to objects so you can have the same object in the list at different positions.

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It's simple - you're storing the same object twice in the list.

Let's go step by step over your method:

List<Bank> banks = new ArrayList<>();
Bank bank = new Bank();

here you create a new ArrayList and a Bank object. Let's say the new Bank object is Bank@100

    bank.setBlz("1");
    bank.setName("Berlin");
    banks.add(bank);

Now you set memebers in Bank@100 and add it to the list. your array list looks like this:

if you now execute Bank bank = new Bank(); you create a new bank object, let's call it Bank@200. you set it to be "8" and add it to your list. your list now is:

OK. Now let's assume you didn't create a new Bank object

your list is and now you modify your bank object, the same Bank@100 object. bank.setBlz("8"); bank.setName("München"); your list hasn't changed, but the values in the object it contains were changed! now you add your bank object to the list, but this is the very same object that is already contained in the list. The list is

So it contains the same object twice, and you happened to modify this object to be "8","Munchen".

If you don't want this to happen you'd have to add to the list like this: banks.add(new Bank(bank)); This is assuming that a copyu constructor is defined for Bank and is working properly.

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Because List is not Set and can store same objects twice as separate elements. You add the same object twice here.

banks.add(bank);
...
banks.add(bank);
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In 2nd example you have same reference type. So the reference type has been override. And List is can contain multiple same type data.

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When you add the Bank object to the list you have a list containing one reference, pointing to your Bank object.

You then modify that object and add it to the list again. Now your List contains two references pointing to one object, whose values are equal to the values you last set them to - 8/Munich.

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