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chef has many resources\providers\definitions, for each of which there are attributes that can be set. for instance, see this and this.

by examine few definitions, it is cleat the the attributes given for a specific resource\provider\definition are packed into a hash pointed by the param variable.

i was wondering whether there is the ability to use a resource\provider\definition without unpacking a hash. here is a pseudo-code or my intentions:

attr = { :name => "/tmp/folder", :owner => "root", :group => "root", :mode => 0755, :action => :create }
directory attr

instead of writing it as follows:

directory "/tmp/folder" do
    owner "root"
    group "root"
    mode 0755
    action :create
end

is there a native way of achieving something alike? thanks you, roth.

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2 Answers 2

by examine few definitions, it is cleat the the attributes given for a specific resource\provider\definition are packed into a hash pointed by the param variable.

This is only true for definitions.

In the case of resources the common attributes (retries/actions/etc) are a mixture of attributes and methods in the Chef::Resource class (super class of all resources). For the resource specific attributes they are typically defined as methods on the resource in question. In the case of LWRPs Chef will generate a class behind the scenes and add each of the attributes as methods to that class.

i was wondering whether there is the ability to use a resource\provider\definition without unpacking a hash.

The Chef::Resource class has a json_create method, so assuming you converted your hash to JSON it may be possible. More generally I'm curious as to the reason for wanting to do this as I believe that it will make your recipes harder to understand.

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You can try the following

attrs = { .. }

directory "/tmp/folder" do
  attrs.each do |method_name, value|
    send(method_name, value)
  end
end

More about Ruby's send: http://apidock.com/ruby/Object/send

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