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I have a couple of classes implementing an ISortable interface:

public interface ISortable
{
    int Id { get; set; }
    int? Idx { get; set; }
}

In my DbContext class I have an update method that should do some extra stuff for entities that implements the ISortable:

public void UpdateSingle<T>(T item) where T : class
{
    // If entity is Sortable, update the indexes of the records between the new and the old index of the updated entity
    var sortable = item as ISortable;
    if (sortable != null)
    {
        Detach(item);   // need to detach the entity from the context in order to retrieve the old values from DB
        var oldItem = Find<T>(sortable.Id) as ISortable;

        if (oldItem != null && sortable.Idx != oldItem.Idx)
        {
            var entities = FindAll<T>().ToList().Cast<ISortable>();

            var oldIdx = oldItem.Idx;
            var newIdx = sortable.Idx;

            if (newIdx > oldIdx)
            {
                var toUpdate = entities.Where(a => a.Idx <= newIdx && a.Idx > oldIdx).Select(a => a);
                foreach (var toUpdateEntity in toUpdate)
                {
                    toUpdateEntity.Idx = toUpdateEntity.Idx - 1;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                var toUpdate = entities.Where(a => a.Idx >= newIdx && a.Idx < oldIdx).Select(a => a);
                foreach (var toUpdateEntity in toUpdate)
                {
                    toUpdateEntity.Idx = toUpdateEntity.Idx + 1;
                }
            }
        }

        Detach(oldItem);
        Attach(item);   // re-attach to enable saving
    }

    Entry(item).State = EntityState.Modified;

    Commit();
}

What I'm wondering about is this line:

var entities = FindAll<T>().ToList().Cast<ISortable>();

I have to convert the LINQ to SQL expression to a list in order to cast the entities to ISortable. And I need to cast it to ISortable in order to perform this Where:

var toUpdate = entities.Where(a => a.Idx <= newIdx && a.Idx > oldIdx).Select(a => a);

The Idx attribute is exposed by the interface.

The problem is that calling ToList() on FindAll() loads the whole table into memory.

Is there a way of performing the Where without first loading the whole table, and without losing the generic implementation?

The idea here is that I want to perform some common action on update for all entities that are "sortable". For this to work the update method needs to be generic in order to handle various classes, but then I need the interface to expose the necessary fields... If there's a better way of doing this (there probably is), please let me know. :-)

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3 Answers 3

The problem is that calling ToList() on FindAll() loads the whole table into memory.

Use AsEnumerable instead of ToList; it just changes the compile-time type to IEnumerable<T> instead of IQueryable<T>, so the subsequent operations are executed in memory rather than in the database, but only one item at a time is processed (items are fetched from the DB one by one as needed by the subsequent operations).

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, would you care to elaborate on why AsEnumerable is better than ToList? I don't understand how loading records one by one is better than loading all at once, when all the rows need to be traversed anyway.. –  Stian Jul 1 '13 at 12:56
    
It's better in terms of memory usage, since only one item is present in memory at a time. In terms of performance, it doesn't make a big difference, since the filtering still has to be done in memory... –  Thomas Levesque Jul 1 '13 at 13:00
    
I see, thanks for the explanation :) –  Stian Jul 1 '13 at 13:12
    
@ThomasLevesque While this is better, it's still far worse than being able to just do the query on the DB end, and that should be possible in this case. –  Servy Jul 1 '13 at 17:19
    
@Servy, I agree, but I'm not sure it's possible to do it with the approach chosen by the OP... –  Thomas Levesque Jul 1 '13 at 19:08

Trying again, this time with expressions. I think this should work:

public void UpdateSingle<T>(T item) where T : class
{
    // If entity is Sortable, update the indexes of the records between the new and the old index of the updated entity
    var sortable = item as ISortable;
    if (sortable != null)
    {
        Detach(item);   // need to detach the entity from the context in order to retrieve the old values from DB
        var oldItem = Find<T>(sortable.Id);

        if (oldItem != null && sortable.Idx != oldItem.Idx)
        {
            UpdateSingleSortable(oldItem, sortable);
        }

        Detach(oldItem);
        Attach(item);   // re-attach to enable saving
    }

    Entry(item).State = EntityState.Modified;

    Commit();
}

public void UpdateSingleSortable<T>(T oldItem, ISortable sortable)
    where T : class
{
    var entities = FindAll<T>();

    var oldIdx = oldItem.Idx;
    var newIdx = sortable.Idx;

    if (newIdx > oldIdx)
    {
        var expression = GenerateExpressionA(oldItem, newIdx, oldIdx);
        var typedExpression = expression as Expression<Func<T, bool>>;
        var toUpdate = entities.Where(typedExpression).Select(a => a);
        foreach (var toUpdateEntity in toUpdate)
        {
            toUpdateEntity.Idx = toUpdateEntity.Idx - 1;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        var expression = GenerateExpressionB(oldItem, newIdx, oldIdx);
        var typedExpression = expression as Expression<Func<T, bool>>;
        var toUpdate = entities.Where(typedExpression).Select(a => a);
        foreach (var toUpdateEntity in toUpdate)
        {
            toUpdateEntity.Idx = toUpdateEntity.Idx + 1;
        }
    }
}

Expression GenerateExpressionB<T>(T t, int? newIdx, int? oldIdx)
{
    //    a => a.Idx >= newIdx && a.Idx < oldIdx
    var underlyingType = t.GetType();
    var idxGetter = underlyingType.GetProperty("Idx");

    Type genericFunc = typeof(Func<,>);
    Type[] typeArgs = { underlyingType, typeof(bool) };
    Type returnType = genericFunc.MakeGenericType(typeArgs);

    var param = Expression.Parameter(underlyingType);
    var toReturn = Expression.Lambda(
        returnType,
        Expression.And
        (
            Expression.GreaterThanOrEqual(
                Expression.MakeMemberAccess(param, idxGetter),
                Expression.Constant(newIdx, typeof(int?))
            ),
            Expression.LessThan(
                Expression.MakeMemberAccess(param, idxGetter),
                Expression.Constant(oldIdx, typeof(int?))
            )
        ),
        param);

    return toReturn;
}

Expression GenerateExpressionA<T>(T t, int? newIdx, int? oldIdx)
{
    //    a => a.Idx <= newIdx && a.Idx > oldIdx
    var underlyingType = t.GetType();
    var idxGetter = underlyingType.GetProperty("Idx");

    Type genericFunc = typeof(Func<,>);
    Type[] typeArgs = { underlyingType, typeof(bool) };
    Type returnType = genericFunc.MakeGenericType(typeArgs);

    var param = Expression.Parameter(underlyingType);
    var toReturn = Expression.Lambda(
        returnType,
        Expression.And
        (
            Expression.LessThanOrEqual(
                Expression.MakeMemberAccess(param, idxGetter),
                Expression.Constant(newIdx, typeof(int?))
            ),
            Expression.GreaterThan(
                Expression.MakeMemberAccess(param, idxGetter),
                Expression.Constant(oldIdx, typeof(int?))
            )
        ),
        param);
    toReturn.Dump();

    return toReturn;
}
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1  
If I understand the question correctly, the UpdateSingle should also work for items that do not implement ISortable... –  Thomas Levesque Jul 1 '13 at 13:01
    
Updated. See code. –  Shlomo Jul 1 '13 at 13:03
    
Not sure it will work, but it's worth a try... –  Thomas Levesque Jul 1 '13 at 13:12
    
Thanks, but I got this error: System.InvalidOperationException: The entity type ISortable is not part of the model for the current context. –  Stian Jul 1 '13 at 13:12
    
I tinkered with the code a bit. Try again? It should work. C# should know to assign the class type of UpdateSingleSortable to T and not ISortable. –  Shlomo Jul 1 '13 at 13:19

Just change the signature of the method to the following:

public void UpdateSingle<T>(T item)
    where T : class, ISortable

Then not only can you perform the query on the DB end (you won't need to pull the collection into memory to get the items meeting the given condition) you also won't be doing the check at runtime; you'll be checking to make sure T implements ISortable at compile time.

share|improve this answer
    
That won't work (already suggested by Shlomo), because ISortable is not part of the EF model –  Thomas Levesque Jul 1 '13 at 19:09

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