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I believe I have used many ways to speed up the UPDATE of many rows, But nothing helped so far.

We are opening a transaction, like this:

private SQLiteTransaction BeginTransaction(SQLiteConnection connection)
{
    return connection.BeginTransaction();
}

and close it at the end of course. We open one connection, one transaction, and then we update many rows on the database. This means we are cumulate many different SQL statements over quite a few tables .

One big part is the update of 12000 records in one table

protected override void UpdateRows(SQLiteConnection connection, IEnumerable<DataRow> rowsToUpdate)     
{
    var command = new SQLiteCommand(Queries.SQLUpdateDocument, connection);

        foreach (DataRow documentRow in rowsToUpdate)
        {
               command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Filename", documentRow[Constants.Col_Document_Filename]);
               command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@ClassID", documentRow[Constants.Col_Document_ClassID]);
               command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@PageCount", documentRow[Constants.Col_Document_PageCount]);
               command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@DocID", documentRow[Constants.Col_Document_GlobalDocID]);
               command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@ReadOnly", documentRow[Constants.Col_Document_ReadOnly]);
               command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Confirmed", documentRow[Constants.Col_Document_Confirmed]);
               command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@ParentFolderID", documentRow[Constants.Col_Document_ParentFolderID]);
               command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@SequenceNumber", documentRow[Constants.Col_Document_SequenceNumber]);
               command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@XmlRepr", documentRow[Constants.Col_Document_XmlRepr]);

               command.ExecuteNonQuery();

               documentRow.AcceptChanges();
    }
}

with the query beeing:

UPDATE T_Doc SET
Filename = @Filename,
ClassID = @ClassID,
PageCount = @PageCount,
ReadOnly = @ReadOnly,
Confirmed = @Confirmed,
ParentFolderID = @ParentFolderID,
SequenceNumber = @SequenceNumber,
XmlRepr = @XmlRepr
WHERE ID = @DocID;

the AcceptChanges() does not take long. The ExecuteNonQuery() is much slower than expected.

PRAGMA foreign_keys = ON;

has been executed before the update command and ClassID and ParentFolderID reference other tables.

Anyways - the update is extremely slow, updating 12000 records takes like 15-30 minutes.

Can anybody help me with this?

share|improve this question
    
Is your table indexed by ID field? If you can show how you organize table, it could help to understand the source of problem. –  athabaska Jul 1 '13 at 14:09
    
try to use transactional model: open transaction-> execute all comands-> commit transaction. –  Tigran Jul 1 '13 at 14:10
    
@athabaska the ID is the primary key. SQLite will create the primary key automatically. –  HankTheTank Jul 1 '13 at 14:11
    
@ago that's exactly what we are doing. opening one transaction and then commiting it. –  HankTheTank Jul 1 '13 at 14:12
1  
Where are you configuring the command to use the transaction created by BeginTransaction? I don't see it. –  Stijn Jul 1 '13 at 14:15
show 7 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I suspect you're not calling BeginTransaction, or perhaps you're not associating the command with the transaction... If a transaction is not specified explicitly, a new one is created implicitly every time you execute a command.

Try this:

protected override void UpdateRows(SQLiteConnection connection, IEnumerable<DataRow> rowsToUpdate)     
{
    using (var command = new SQLiteCommand(Queries.SQLUpdateDocument, connection))
    using (var transaction = connection.BeginTransaction())
    {
        command.Transaction = transaction;

        foreach (DataRow documentRow in rowsToUpdate)
        {
               command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Filename", documentRow[Constants.Col_Document_Filename]);
               command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@ClassID", documentRow[Constants.Col_Document_ClassID]);
               command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@PageCount", documentRow[Constants.Col_Document_PageCount]);
               command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@DocID", documentRow[Constants.Col_Document_GlobalDocID]);
               command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@ReadOnly", documentRow[Constants.Col_Document_ReadOnly]);
               command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Confirmed", documentRow[Constants.Col_Document_Confirmed]);
               command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@ParentFolderID", documentRow[Constants.Col_Document_ParentFolderID]);
               command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@SequenceNumber", documentRow[Constants.Col_Document_SequenceNumber]);
               command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@XmlRepr", documentRow[Constants.Col_Document_XmlRepr]);

               command.ExecuteNonQuery();

               documentRow.AcceptChanges();
        }

        transaction.Commit();
    }
}

Note that if you have a very large number of rows, you might want to commit before you have updated everything, e.g. every 1000 rows. In that case you need to create a new transaction after committing the previous one.

share|improve this answer
    
do I really have to assign the transaction to the command? I believed it was set automatically –  HankTheTank Jul 1 '13 at 14:33
    
Just a comment on the concept of committing transactions before the entire 'conceptual' transaction is complete. Although it is a valid potential workaround, you do lose the transactional consistency that a single transaction provides. So use with care, and I would advise to only do this as a last ditch effort to get insertion performance within your desired limits. You do lose much from this approach. –  Jake Heidt Jul 1 '13 at 14:46
    
@JakeHeidt, you're right, but in this case, the use of a transaction is mostly a way to improve performance, rather than a way to ensure consistency... –  Thomas Levesque Jul 1 '13 at 15:09
    
@HankTheTank, from what i've seen, not all ADO.NET providers work the same way when it comes to handling transactions, so I usually assign the transaction explicitly, just to be safe... –  Thomas Levesque Jul 1 '13 at 15:10
    
yup - this did it. I never assigned the transaction..... that was pretty silly. write operations are now many many times faster.Of course you need to assign the transaction, I did that in the constructor of the command now. thank you very much. –  HankTheTank Jul 2 '13 at 8:31
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