Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like make table of chosen physical properties of elements (for example atomization enthalpy, vaporization enthalpy, heat of vaporization, boiling point), which are accessible on this page.

It is a huge pain to do it by hand, and I didn't find any other machine-processing-friendly source of such data on the internet.

I was trying to learn how to to do it in Python (because I want to use this data for my other code written in Python / NumPy / Pandas).

I was able to download the webpage HTML code with urllib2, and I was trying to learn how to use some HTML/XML parser like ElementTree or MiniDom. However I have no experience with web programing and HTML/XML processing.

share|improve this question
    
Use BeautifulSoup for this kind of thing, it is way easier to use than the parsers available in the standard lib. –  doukremt Jul 1 '13 at 14:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Using lxml's xpath support, you can parse the data easily. Here's an example parsing the atomization enthalpy

import lxml.html
import urllib2

html = urllib2.urlopen("http://http://environmentalchemistry.com/yogi/periodic/W.html").read()
doc = lxml.html.document_fromstring(html)
result = doc.xpath("/html/body/div[2]/div[2]/div[1]/div[1]/ul[7]/li[8]")

You could dynamically generate the xpath string for the different elements, and use a dict to parse the require fields.

share|improve this answer

Thank you, raphonic

It was necessary modify your code slightly to get it work, but thanks for kickstart. This code is working:

import lxml.html
import lxml.etree
import urllib2

opener = urllib2.build_opener()
opener.addheaders = [('User-agent', 'Mozilla/5.0')]
infile = opener.open('http://environmentalchemistry.com/yogi/periodic/W.html')
html = infile.read()

doc = lxml.html.document_fromstring(html)
result = doc.xpath("/html/body/div[2]/div[1]/div[1]/div[1]/ul[7]/li[8]")
print lxml.etree.tostring(result[0])

but probably it is not the best one

Anyway. Because the structure of the page for different elements is not exactly the same, I would probably use just simple string.find() and regular expersion. Like this

import urllib2
opener = urllib2.build_opener()
opener.addheaders = [('User-agent', 'Mozilla/5.0')]
infile = opener.open('http://environmentalchemistry.com/yogi/periodic/W.html')
page = infile.read()

i = page.find("Heat of Vaporization")
substr = page[i:i+50]
print substr

import re
non_decimal = re.compile(r'[^\d.]+')
print non_decimal.sub('', substr)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.