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I have a c program that must get information about particular files on a linux machine. For example:

#include <stdlib.h>
int main(){
     system("/bin/stat /home/kehelc/programs/test.dtl | egrep Birth | awk '{ print $2, $3 }'");
     return 0;
}

This outputs: 2013-07-01 11:57:52.208220100

I want to now format this output so that it looks like: Mon, 1 Jul, 2013 at 11:57:52

Can I do this with sed & awk?

thanks

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closed as off-topic by Tim Cooper, shellter, Kerrek SB, umläute, Adam Siemion Jul 2 '13 at 12:19

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions concerning problems with code you've written must describe the specific problem — and include valid code to reproduce it — in the question itself. See SSCCE.org for guidance." – shellter, Kerrek SB, umläute, Adam Siemion
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13  
Is there any reason to use system() rather than the stat() function? –  Andreas Jul 1 '13 at 14:09
2  
possible duplicate of How to get file creation date in linux? –  Tim Cooper Jul 1 '13 at 14:10
3  
C is not meant for scripting. –  Kristopher Micinski Jul 1 '13 at 14:18

1 Answer 1

Yes, you can use popen and read the output stream, then you can format it as you please ;)

   /* simply invoke a app, pipe output*/
    pipe = popen("ls -l", "r" );
    if (pipe == NULL ) {
        printf("invoking %s failed: %s\n", buf, strerror(errno));
        return 1;
    }

    waitfor(10);

    while(!feof(pipe) ) {
        if( fgets( buf, 128, pipe ) != NULL ) {
            printf("%s\n", buf );
        }
    }

    /* Close pipe */
    rc = pclose(pipe);

or you can use strftime directly in awk:

awk '{print strftime("%c", ( <timestamp in milliseconds> + 500 ) / 1000 )}'

see the strftime man page for reference http://linux.die.net/man/3/strftime

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3  
Isn't it more efficient to use stat(2) rather than stat(1)? –  trojanfoe Jul 1 '13 at 14:24
    
@trojanfoe: I agree, but that's not what he asked for :) –  Stefan Steiger Jul 1 '13 at 14:26
1  
True, however suggesting a better approach altogether is OK. –  trojanfoe Jul 1 '13 at 14:27

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