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I would like to put the code for connecting to mysql in a separate function in PHP and then use that function in other functions. Surprisingly, I haven't been able to find online resources on how to do that. I want to do something like this:

function connect_mysql() {

$con = mysqli_connect("localhost", "root", "somepass", "testdb");

if (mysqli_connect_errno($con)) {
echo "Failed to connect to MySQL: " . mysqli_connect_error();
}

return $con;
}

function some_function() {
connect_mysql(); 
// and use that connection here 
//so that I don't have to retype connection code again
}

Thanks very much!

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Danny Beckett, bensiu, Ionică Bizău, RDC, Riccardo Marotti Jul 1 '13 at 16:03

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. –  Danny Beckett Jul 1 '13 at 14:14
    
Danny, Tim answered below. –  Davit Jul 1 '13 at 14:17
    
I still fail to see any problems with the code you posted. –  Danny Beckett Jul 1 '13 at 14:18
    
Danny, I'm sorry it really was kind of vague. It's a bit complicated and long to explain everything here, but to be short about it, I misused including connect_mysql() function in another function body. Sorry to confuse you and thanks for your attention. –  Davit Jul 1 '13 at 14:32
1  
Thanks thanks! It's really helpful here. :) –  Davit Jul 1 '13 at 14:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would do it in the following manner, using a static variable inside of connect_mysql so only one MySQL connection is ever created:

function connect_mysql() {
    static $con = null;
    if ($con == null) {
        $con = mysqli_connect("localhost", "root", "somepass", "testdb");
        if (mysqli_connect_errno($con)) {
            echo "Failed to connect to MySQL: " . mysqli_connect_error();
            return null;
        }
    }
    return $con;
}

function some_function() {
    $con = connect_mysql();
    $con->prepare(...);
}

This is an example of the singleton pattern.

share|improve this answer
    
Great! :) that's exactly what I need. Thanks! –  Davit Jul 1 '13 at 14:16
    
I marked it and it said, I'd get an answer in a few minutes. Although, I don't know what that means. –  Davit Jul 1 '13 at 14:33
1  
@Davit You just need to wait a little longer ;) –  Danny Beckett Jul 1 '13 at 14:33

Two thinks to consider:

(1) If you want to continue the object in your function some_function(), then use a variable for it:

Example:

function some_function() {
    $my = connect_mysql();
    $my->query('some great sql query...');
}

(2) To improve your connection function connect_mysql() you should exit it with a defined state whenever it fails to connect, maybe like this:

function connect_mysql() {
    $con = mysqli_connect("localhost", "root", "somepass", "testdb");

    if (mysqli_connect_errno($con)) {
        echo "Failed to connect to MySQL: " . mysqli_connect_error();
        return false;   // <- exit here....
    }

    return $con;
}

Thats not necessarily required, but it helps you detect problems outside of your function and maintain the code when it gets bigger.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a useful information Bjoern. Thanks! –  Davit Jul 1 '13 at 14:23

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