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IsReusable Property

Below is my understanding for IsReusable Property

If the handler returns static content. it is safe to set the value to true. But if the thread returns dynamic content, to make it thread safe, IsReusable should be set to set as false.

In such case the Context Switching may occur, which may cause the handler to give wrong output.

Confusions

Context Switching says - Switching of one thread to another thread is called switching. right?

Paragraph 2 says context switching may occur - I think, when you send the request. That time only one context creates, which results in a Response. right? So, How Context Switching is possible. Can you give an example?

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A link to the property in question would be nice –  Panagiotis Kanavos Jul 9 '13 at 14:57
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As I get correct you asked about IHttpHandler.IsReusable Property. You are not first who meets trouble with understanding this property. You could check [next answer and comments of ](stackoverflow.com/a/5501138/182344). In my opinion @Branislav Abadjimarinov explained this property in clever and simple way. –  RredCat Jul 10 '13 at 19:12
    
What's your purpose exactly? –  AmirHossein Mehrvarzi Jul 23 '13 at 3:21
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1 Answer

The question what the handler "returns" (better phrased: what content the handler writes) has nothing to do with the IsReusable property. This property makes a statement about the thread-safety of your code, not about whether the content can change. For example, a handler that writes DateTime.Now would be reusable. A handler that has an SqlConnection field and reads unchanging data would not be reusable because the connection is not thread-safe even if the data read is always the same.

Context switching also has nothing to do with this because on a multi-core box no context switch is necessary to cause concurrency. What you mean is "thread-safety" with respect to concurrent invocations of ProcessRequest on the same instance of your IHttpHandler derived class.

Now some practical advice: always have IsReusable return false and ensure that your handler class is cheap to allocate and does not bring tons of garbage with it. GC'ing a single object is nothing! My guess is the IsReusable property was created to give ASP.NET an artificial advantage in toy benchmarks, or to support poorly architected handlers that are expensive to create.

If you have expensive resources (like caches) store them elsewhere (in a static field maybe).

An easy way to obtain thread-safety is to not share anything. In that sense, don't share the handler.

TL;DR: Set IsReusable to false and move on. Nothing to see here. This is just a confusing design flaw in ASP.NET.

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+1 thx for the info. –  PKKG Jul 27 '13 at 13:11
    
Paragraph 2 says context switching may occur - I think, when you send the request. That time only one context creates, which results in a Response. right? So, How Context Switching is possible. Can you explain this part in the question ? –  PKKG Jul 27 '13 at 13:14
    
Context switching is a special case of concurrency problems. Context switching can occur at any time and multiple times. This is true for all threads, not just for IIS.; "only one context creates" not sure what you mean. Even when IsReusable is true, each call to ProcessRequest will receive a different HttpContext. IsReusable does not alter the way HTTP requests are processed and responses are sent. It has no effect on content whatsoever. –  usr Jul 27 '13 at 13:26
    
When you send the request, this create a new object of a page in asp.net web pages(web pages are derived from HttpHandler and internally creates an instance of page and call the page events thereafter). I am going bit off topic. But trying to understand it fully...If this is true, then where did Context Switching occur ? For each Session, there is only one Context. Request is going to be created. So, when did it change the request for any intermediate jobs ? –  PKKG Jul 27 '13 at 13:41
    
A context switch has nothing to do with ASP.NET. If you disagree with this please say so.; With "Context" you probably mean HttpContext? That's different. We need to clean up the terminology first. Make sure you understand what both terms mean. "For each Session, there is only one Context" What exactly is meant by Context here? There is no relationship between an ASP.NET session and a context of any kind. "So, when did it change the request for any intermediate jobs ?" unclear! it? jobs? intermediate? I fail to interpret your sentence. –  usr Jul 27 '13 at 14:36
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