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I want to use the following PHP IPN package:

https://github.com/mike182uk/paypal-ipn-listener

Now here is the example code from github:

    $request = new PayPal\Ipn\Request\Curl();

$request->secure(true); //dont need to do this as its done by default, just demonstrating configuring the request component

$listener = new PayPal\Ipn\Listener($request);

$listener->setMode('sandbox');

try {
    $status = $listener->verifyIpn();
}
catch (Exception $e) {
    $error = $e->getMessage();
    $status = false;
}

if ($status) {
    // verified...
}
else {
    // invalid...
    $report = $listener->getReport();
}

So since it looks like the request and the listener are executed in the same action, how would this work with routing? I thought you'd set a post or data variable ipn_notification_url to the url where your ipn was at but it looks like if I set it to the same route as this above that it would resend the request?

I just don't see how the initial request is made (thru a form/post?) I'd like it to work with a cart so I'd imagine you'd send it to a route that feeds the cart contents array to the data field to initialize the $request. But with the example above it looks like the ipn listener is in the same route as the initial request?

I'm sorry for the newbness but small examples help noobs along way

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Perhaps this can help you? net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/php/how-to-setup-recurring-payments –  xDragonZ Jul 1 '13 at 16:58
    
I'm looking for how routing would be handled and how the initial requests would be built using the Paypal package I linked to, but in laravel –  CI_Guy Jul 1 '13 at 16:59

1 Answer 1

Here's how I added this package to my L4 install:

1: Add the package to your composer.json file in your site root.

"require" : {
... (existing requirements),
"mike182uk/paypal-ipn-listener": "dev-master"
}

"autoload" : {
... (existing autoload stuff, certainly the classmap array),
"psr-0": {"PayPal": "src/"}

2: Run composer update from your site root and let it do its thing.

3: Add a POST route to your routes.php file for PayPal to hit with the IPN:

Route::post('payment/ipn.php', array('as' => 'paypal.payment-ipn', 'uses' => 'PaymentsController@paypal_ipn'));

4: In your PaymentsController (or whatever the name of the Controller you're using to handle Payments is) add a function named paypal_ipn(). That's where the sample code in the question goes:

/*
==================
    PayPal IPN Stuff
==================
*/

public function paypal_ipn(){

    $request = new PayPal\Ipn\Request\Curl();

    $listener = new PayPal\Ipn\Listener($request);

    $listener->setMode('sandbox');

    try {
        $status = $listener->verifyIpn();
    }
    catch (Exception $e) {
        $error = $e->getMessage();
        $status = false;
    }

    if ($status) {
        // verified...
        error_log('Verified');
    }
    else {
        // invalid...
        $report = $listener->getReport();
    }

}

This works for me. Please let me know if any of it is the wrong way to go.

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