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I need to sum the elements of a list, containing all zeros or ones, so that the result is 1 if there is a 1 in the list, but 0 otherwise.

def binary_search(l, low=0,high=-1):
    if not l: return -1
    if(high == -1): high = len(l)-1
    if low == high:
        if l[low] == 1: return low
        else: return -1
    mid = (low + high)//2
    upper = [l[mid:high]]
    lower = [l[0:mid-1]]
    u = sum(int(x) for x in upper)
    lo = sum(int(x) for x in lower)
    if u == 1: return binary_search(upper, mid, high)
    elif lo == 1: return binary_search(lower, low, mid-1)
    return -1

 l = [0 for x in range(255)]
 l[123] = 1
 binary_search(l)

The code I'm using to test

u = sum(int(x) for x in upper)

works fine in the interpreter, but gives me the error

TypeError: int() argument must be a string or a number, not 'list'

I've just started to use python, and can't figure out what's going wrong (the version I've written in c++ doesn't work either).

Does anyone have any pointers?

Also, how would I do the sum so that it is a binary xor, not simply decimal addition?

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Where is x defined? –  arshajii Jul 1 '13 at 16:01
1  
Do you just need the any function? –  Brendan Long Jul 1 '13 at 16:02
    
@BrendanLong yes, it turned out that worked. First afternoon with Python. –  Tom Kealy Jul 1 '13 at 18:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I need to sum the elements of a list, containing all zeros or ones, so that the result is 1 if there is a 1 in the list, but 0 otherwise.

No need to sum the whole list; you can stop at the first 1. Simply use any(). It will return True if there is at least one truthy value in the container and False otherwise, and it short-circuits (i.e. if a truthy value is found early in the list, it doesn't scan the rest). Conveniently, 1 is truthy and 0 is not.

True and False work as 1 and 0 in an arithmetic context (Booleans are a subclass of integers), but if you want specifically 1 and 0, just wrap any() in int().

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You don't actually want a sum; you want to know whether upper or lower contains a 1 value. Just take advantage of Python's basic container-type syntax:

if 1 in upper:
    # etc
if 1 in lower:
    # etc

The reason you're getting the error, by the way, is because you're wrapping upper and lower with an extra nested list when you're trying to split l (rename this variable, by the way!!). You just want to split it like this:

upper = the_list[mid:high]
lower = the_list[:mid-1]

Finally, it's worth noting that your logic is pretty weird. This is not a binary search in the classic sense of the term. It looks like you're implementing "find the index of the first occurrence of 1 in this list". Even ignoring the fact that there's a built-in function to do this already, you would be much better served by just iterating through the whole list until you find a 1. Right now, you've got O(nlogn) time complexity (plus a bunch of extra one-off loops), which is pretty silly considering the output can be replicated in O(n) time by:

def first_one(the_list):
    for i in range(len(the_list)):
        if the_list[i] == 1:
            return i
    return -1

Or of course even more simply by using the built-in function index:

def first_one(the_list):
    try:
        return the_list.index(1)
    except ValueError:
        return -1
share|improve this answer

I need to sum the elements of a list, containing all zeros or ones, so that the result is 1 if there is a 1 in the list, but 0 otherwise.

What's wrong with

int(1 in l)
share|improve this answer

Stop making nested lists.

upper = l[mid:high]
lower = l[0:mid-1]
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I've only started using python this afternoon! –  Tom Kealy Jul 1 '13 at 16:04

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