Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class Game with a constructor with the following signature:

public Game(String[] boardState) throws InvalidStringsInputException, WrongNumberOfMarksException

And there is a method in junit4 testcase:

public static Game newGameFromStringsSuccessful(String[] input) //it is the line 9
{
    try
    {
        return new Game(input);
    }
    catch (WrongNumberOfMarksException exception)
    {
        fail("Caught exception where it shouldn't be");
    }
    catch (InvalidStringsInputException exception)
    {
        fail("Caught exception where it shouldn't be");
    }
}

I am using eclipse and it shows me an error: This method must return a result of type Game line 9 Java Problem

If I insert return null in the ends of both catch blocks, the error disappears, but my question doesn't: why does java want it even after fail() method is called?

share|improve this question
    
Answers below cover how to avoid this. However, I think it's important to note that this might be a bad design. I don't think you need to throw exceptions here, you should ensure that input[] is never invalid. Or if that is not possible, have a default setup in the constructor to fall back on. –  MaxAlexander Jul 1 '13 at 16:25
    
@MaxAlexander I need those exception for defensive programming. –  CrabMan Jul 1 '13 at 17:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

why does java want it even after fail() method is called?

Because the compiler doesn't know that fail can't return normally. There's no way of expressing that within Java. The end of the fail message call is still reachable - so the end of the method is also reachable.

Suppose there was a bug in the fail method, so you ended up reaching the end of the method - what would you expect to happen?

The simplest fix for this is to throw some runtime exception at the end of the method, e.g. AssertionError:

throw new AssertionError("fail must have returned normally!");

It's basically an exception to say "The world is crazy, I don't want to live here any more" - which also keeps the compiler happy, as the closing brace of the method is no longer reachable.

Another alternative - not available here, as you don't control the fail method - would be to declare the fail method to return some kind of runtime exception, at which point your catch blocks could look like this:

catch (InvalidStringsInputException exception)
{
    throw fail("Caught exception where it shouldn't be");
}

Of course the implementation of fail would still be to throw an exception rather than return it, but it means the compiler knows that that catch block is definitely not going to complete normally.

share|improve this answer

Jon's answer below explains why the compiler is complaining. However, I suggest that the correct way to avoid this is to not have the try/catch in you test. Just let the exception propagate up the call stack and out of your test. JUnit will catch it and fail the test while providing the entire stack trace of where the exception was thrown.

Or if you prefer not to have to propagate the throws clause, wrap the exception in a RuntimeException and then throw that. Again, this will provide the stack trace to allow for better diagnosis.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.