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Why is it that this works:

>>> f = np.array(([[10,20],[11,21],[11,21],[12,22],[13,23]]))
>>> f
array([[10, 20],
   [11, 21],
   [11, 21],
   [12, 22],
   [13, 23]])
>>> f.view([('',f.dtype)]*f.shape[1])
array([[(10, 20)],
   [(11, 21)],
   [(11, 21)],
   [(12, 22)],
   [(13, 23)]], 
  dtype=[('f0', '<i8'), ('f1', '<i8')])

but this does not:

>>> f = np.array(([10,11,11,12,13],[20,21,21,22,23])).T
>>> f
array([[10, 20],
   [11, 21],
   [11, 21],
   [12, 22],
   [13, 23]])
>>>  f.view([('',f.dtype)]*f.shape[1])
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: new type not compatible with array.
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your numpy array is by default stored in memory in a single contiguous block in row major order. When you define a structured array, all fields must also be contiguous in memory. In your case, you require that every row be stored in consecutive positions in memory. When you transpose the array, instead of shuffling data around, only the strides are changed, which means that now it is columns that are stored in consecutive positions in memory.

While it may require copying the data, which is slow, the safe way of going about this is calling np.ascontiguousarray before doing struct array magic:

>>> f = np.array([[10,11,11,12,13],[20,21,21,22,23]]).T
>>> f = np.ascontiguousarray(f)
>>> f.view([('',f.dtype)]*f.shape[1])
array([[(10, 20)],
       [(11, 21)],
       [(11, 21)],
       [(12, 22)],
       [(13, 23)]], 
      dtype=[('f0', '<i4'), ('f1', '<i4')])
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the clear explanation (while my answer was cryptic!), although I still think that if possible one should avoid np.ascontiguousarray by constructing an array with the correct memory layout. –  Stefano M Jul 2 '13 at 7:23

It's a memory layout problem:

>>> f = np.array(([[10,20],[11,21],[11,21],[12,22],[13,23]]))
>>> f.flags.c_contiguous
True
>>> f = np.array(([10,11,11,12,13],[20,21,21,22,23])).T
>>> f.flags.c_contiguous
False
>>> f.view([('',f.dtype)]*f.shape[0])
array([[(10, 11, 11, 12, 13), (20, 21, 21, 22, 23)]], 
      dtype=[('f0', '<i8'), ('f1', '<i8'), ('f2', '<i8'), ('f3', '<i8'), ('f4', '<i8')])

If you like it you can fix as

>>> f = np.array(([10,11,11,12,13],[20,21,21,22,23]), order='F').T
>>> f.flags.c_contiguous
True
>>> f.view([('',f.dtype)]*f.shape[1])
array([[(10, 20)],
       [(11, 21)],
       [(11, 21)],
       [(12, 22)],
       [(13, 23)]], 
      dtype=[('f0', '<i8'), ('f1', '<i8')])

But what is the usefulness of this view?

share|improve this answer
    
I use the view to call np.unique(). –  user100464 Jul 1 '13 at 16:51

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