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I had this interview question -

Swap byte 2 and byte 4 within an integer sequence. Integer is a 4 byte wide i.e. 32 bits

My approach was to use char *pointer and a temp char to swap the bytes. For clarity I have broken the steps otherwise an character array can be considered.

unsigned char *b2, *b4, tmpc;
int n = 0xABCD; ///expected output 0xADCB
b2 = &n;   b2++;  
b4 = &n;   b4 +=3;
///swap the values;
tmpc = *b2;
*b2 = *b4;
*b4 = tmpc;

Any other methods?

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This is a good method to use! –  Magn3s1um Jul 1 '13 at 17:06
5  
I'd probably use logical AND/OR/shift stuff. –  Hot Licks Jul 1 '13 at 17:06
5  
Did you get the job? –  nurdglaw Jul 1 '13 at 17:13
1  
@czarx Perhaps they don't like aliasing through incompatible pointer types. –  user529758 Jul 1 '13 at 17:22
1  
0xABCD -> 0xADCB is a nybble exchange, not a byte exchange, and the code given will not implement that. –  sh1 Jul 1 '13 at 22:14
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted
int someInt = 0x12345678;

int byte2 = someInt & 0x00FF0000;
int byte4 = someInt & 0x000000FF;
int newInt = (someInt & 0xFF00FF00) | (byte2 >> 16) | (byte4 << 16);

To avoid any concerns about sign extension:

int someInt = 0x12345678;
int newInt = (someInt & 0xFF00FF00) | ((someInt >> 16) & 0x000000FF) | ((someInt << 16) & 0x00FF0000);

(Or, to really impress them, you could use the triple XOR technique.)

Just for fun (probably a tupo somewhere):

int newInt = someInt ^ ((someInt >> 16) & 0x000000FF);
newInt = newInt ^ ((newInt << 16) & 0x00FF0000);
newInt = newInt ^ ((newInt >> 16) & 0x000000FF);

(Actually, I just tested it and it works!)

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Do you have to worry about sign extension if the input is negative? –  Emil Sit Jul 1 '13 at 17:16
    
this is also good –  Grijesh Chauhan Jul 1 '13 at 17:17
    
@EmilSit - that depends on the language. My C is a little rusty. –  Hot Licks Jul 1 '13 at 17:17
    
XOR technique it's a very nice technique, but fail when dealing with values that can be zero. A little be dangerous :) –  Kira Jul 1 '13 at 18:08
    
@Kira -- Not true. If you feel it's true show us a credible reference that states that. –  Hot Licks Jul 1 '13 at 18:13
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You can mask out the bytes you want and shift them around. Something like this:

unsigned int swap(unsigned int n) {
  unsigned int b2 = (0x0000FF00 & n);
  unsigned int b4 = (0xFF000000 & n);
  n ^= b2 | b4;                 // Clear the second and fourth bytes
  n |= (b2 << 16) | (b4 >> 16); // Swap and write them.
  return n;
}

This assumes that the "first" byte is the lowest order byte (even if in memory it may be stored big-endian).

Also it uses unsigned ints everywhere to avoid right shifting introducing extra 1s due to sign extension.

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Depends on whether you count from the bottom or the top. That is not specified in the problem statement. –  Hot Licks Jul 1 '13 at 17:13
    
ok this is good –  Grijesh Chauhan Jul 1 '13 at 17:17
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What about unions?

int main(void)
{
    char  tmp;
    union {int n; char ary[4]; } un;

    un.n = 0xABCDEF00;
    tmp = un.ary[3];
    un.ary[3] = un.ary[1];
    un.ary[1] = tmp;
    printf("0x%.2X\n", un.n);
}

in > 0xABCDEF00

out>0xEFCDAB00

Please don't forget to check endianess. this only work for little endian, but should not be hard to make it portable.

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