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Can anyone tell me how to write a C program to compare numbers(including negative numbers) without using logical operators?

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4  
What exactly do you want to get as a result? –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 16 '09 at 9:24
1  
I'm fairly certain that this is a dup, but can't find the older question. Considering the other question has an explicitly coded solution, that's probably a good thing. –  outis Nov 16 '09 at 9:44
    
As Sam152 mentionned, you can always text for equality with XOR (^ operator in C). if (a ^ b == 0) -> they're equal –  Tamas Czinege Nov 16 '09 at 13:13

11 Answers 11

This is Carl's evil twin, here to tell you you're all puny weaklings!

Here's a solution that does not only without logical operators but also without relational operators (including ==) and without if. Just arithmetic and indexing, baby!

#include "stdio.h"
#include "limits.h"
int sign(int number) {
  return (unsigned) number / (unsigned) INT_MIN;
}
int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  int a = atoi(argv[1]);
  int b = atoi(argv[2]);
  int dif = a - b;
  int sb1 = sign(dif);
  int sb2 = sign(dif - 1) - sb1;
  int ptr = 2 * sb2 + sb1;
  char *messages[3] = {
    "%d is greater than %d",
    "%d is less than %d",
    "%d is equal to %d" };
  printf(messages[ptr], a, b);
}

Some test results:

$ ./compare 42 69
42 is less than 69

$ ./compare 69 42
69 is greater than 42

$ ./compare 42 -15
42 is greater than -15

$ ./compare 999 999
999 is equal to 999

$ ./compare -9 -10
-9 is greater than -10

The original question, on the other hand, is much easier. Logical operators are just !, &, &&, |, || and !. I think a couple of nested ifs would do it handily.

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4  
+1 Because I like this solution as it does not use if which feels like cheating. –  Peter G. Jul 21 '10 at 16:56
    
I'm tempted to down vote -1 since you hid your conditional logic inside of the implementation of sign(x). What do you think sign(x) does? AFAIK, there is no intrinsic implementation that does this without "logical operators" (conditional?) logic. –  Mark Lakata May 16 '13 at 15:50
    
@Mark Lakata: I know exactly what sign() does, at least in my program! If you were to read my code more carefully (lines 3-5), you would see it too. –  Carl Smotricz May 17 '13 at 18:22
    
Oh of course. Sorry. Your sign() function is not the traditional sign() function which returns -1,0 or +1. But division is a pretty expensive thing. You may as well do (((unsigned)number)>>31)&1, to get 1 for negatives and 0 for not negative. –  Mark Lakata May 20 '13 at 22:10
    
@Mark Lakata: No problem. There is no sign() in the standard C library. Given the question, this solution's goal is for novelty and simplicity, not performance. Note that as it stands it's independent of the bit width of an integer, so long as it's 2's complement; so I don't need to hardcode "31" into it. –  Carl Smotricz May 22 '13 at 16:10

Yeah, you can subtract them and look at the difference.

I know, that leads to the next question: How can you tell if the difference is < 0, = 0 or > 0? Well, you can take care of < 0 by checking if the sign bit is set.

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Which leads to the question: how to inspect the difference without logical operators ;) –  Stephan202 Nov 16 '09 at 9:25
1  
sir can u show the program how it can be. –  Madhan Nov 16 '09 at 9:26
13  
No. I don't want to do your homework. –  Carl Smotricz Nov 16 '09 at 9:27
    
@Stephan: there are always the arithmetic operators and shifts. * can stand in for && in a pinch. –  outis Nov 16 '09 at 10:00

We're not going to do your homework, but let me add some hints on how to proceed. We assume that we're going to compare a and b.

  1. As Carl states, you may want to look at the difference d = a - b.
    • Observation: d can be negative, zero or positive.
    • Question: which value of d corresponds to which (in)equality of a and b?
  2. Once you have calculated d and know how to interpret it, you have to find ways to inspect it without using logical operators.
    • Observation: obvious candidates are the bitwise operators.
    • Question: but how do computers (usually) store integers?
    • Hint: have a look at two's complement.
    • Question: how can you tell the difference between a negative and a non-negative number?
  3. Now you have all information needed to answer the question.
    • Hint: you are, of course, allowed to use if and else statements.
    • Bonus hint: you may want to use INT_MIN from limits.h.

Edit: this answer, and most other answers here assume that the OP is not allowed to use logical and relational (comparison) operators. However, the OP only explicitly mentions that logical operators are disallowed. I think the main reason for this misunderstanding is the fact that the problem is trivial to solve using comparison operators.

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here is a program that compares the two numbers without using relation operators (it also works for negative numbers). check it out.

/------C program-------/

void main()
{
     int a,b,c,temp;
     printf("enter a and b:");
     scanf("%d%d",&a,&b);
     c=a-b;
     temp=c+abs(c);      // to check if the difference is negative or not
     if(temp==0)
     printf("a is smaller than b");
     else 
     printf("a is bigger than b");
     getch();
     }

EDIT: Maddy's revised code (from his comment below) follows.

void main() { 
  int a,b,c,d,temp; 
  printf("enter a and b:"); 
  scanf("%d%d",&a,&b); 
  c=a-b; 
  d=abs(c); 
  temp=c+d; 
  if (c==0) printf("a is equal to b"); 
  else if(temp==0) printf("a is smaller than b"); 
  else printf("a is bigger than b"); 
  printf("%d",d); getch(); 
}

i think now the code works well for all inputs...

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3  
Giving a full, even though not correct, solution to a homework question is never good. Hence the down vote. –  Paulius Nov 16 '09 at 12:28
    
The above code works well. i did not get what is the problem with this code? –  Madhan Nov 16 '09 at 12:31
1  
@Paulius: indeed this is incorrect, but note that it is the OP who posted this answer. –  Stephan202 Nov 16 '09 at 12:32
    
@Maddy: what if a = b? –  Stephan202 Nov 16 '09 at 12:32
    
void main() { int a,b,c,d,temp; printf("enter a and b:"); scanf("%d%d",&a,&b); c=a-b; d=abs(c); temp=c+d; if(c==0) printf("a is equal to b"); else if(temp==0) printf("a is smaller than b"); else printf("a is bigger than b"); printf("%d",d); getch(); } i think now the code works well for all inputs... –  Madhan Nov 16 '09 at 12:49

You can use the relational operators (<, >, <=, >=) and/or the equality operators (==, !=).

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+1: only now I notice that the OP doesn't exclude those. I wonder whether we collectively misinterpreted the question, or that the OP did not properly state his assignment. (I'm inclined to go for the latter.) –  Stephan202 Nov 16 '09 at 12:34
    
See my second solution, near the bottom. I agree that we probably made a big deal out of an almost trivial question. Shame on us! Err, you! –  Carl Smotricz Nov 16 '09 at 12:53
    
I went for the latter as well, but still wanted to see a strict literal answer here. And maybe point out the pointlessness of such an excercise. (Now, if the question had said "two's complement signed integers" or "arithmetic logic" instead of "C", it would have been another matter.) –  aib Nov 16 '09 at 13:27

Suppose you have int x and int y. Let int z=x-y, and then repeatedly (31 or 63 times depending on your preferences) take z|=z<<1 and z|=z>>1. If the difference is zero, z=0, and if the difference is nonzero, z=-1. Add one to z and use it to index into an array of function pointers containing the instructions you want to follow in each case.

You can do this more efficiently if you're allowed to use assembly, but since this doesn't sound like a practical problem I don't think those solutions are worth exploring too deeply. If you wanted a practical solution, you'd just use the logic operators :)

Now, the problem statement is highly dubious as computer arithmetic is defined using "logic operators" but if you naively assume (as they probably want you to) that what you type is what you use, the above solution should suffice.

EDIT: You DO NOT need to use if/else statements. If the sign of the comparison is important, bring the sign into the 2s place and use that to index into a function pointer array.

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Last sentence is a clever hint, +1. –  Carl Smotricz Nov 16 '09 at 12:58

Keep in mind that logic operator are much faster than arithmetic operators.

As an answer for you...

if(x-y){ elements are different}else{ they are equals}
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You sure bout that statement? In a modern CPU, most (all?) integer 'rithmetic is done in 1 cycle, while logic usually means jumping and jumping usually means dumped pipelines. –  Carl Smotricz Nov 16 '09 at 12:55
    
actually no:) the JMP instructions are detected by the branch predictor in the CPU and are prefeched before even the need for execution. Arithmetic is faster for 8-32bytes, for MMX is actually slower(not really sure about that, but i guess it would be easy to find out) "Dumped pipelines" happens when doiung calls, not local(small) jumps. –  Quamis Nov 18 '09 at 8:49

Here is a program that compares the two numbers without using relation operators (it also works for negative numbers).

void main()
{
     int a,b,c,d,temp;
     printf("enter a and b:");
     scanf("%d%d",&a,&b);
     c=a-b;
     d=abs(c);
     temp=c+d;
     if(c==0)
         printf("a is equal to b");
     else if(temp==0)
         printf("a is smaller than b");
     else 
         printf("a is bigger than b");
     printf("%d",d);
     getch();
 }

I think now the code works well for all inputs...

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@Maddy: select your code and press ctrl+k to properly format it here on SO. Also, please properly indent it (like I did for you). –  Stephan202 Nov 16 '09 at 12:54
    
@Maddy, also, next time please update/edit your previous answer instead of posting a new one. –  Stephan202 Nov 16 '09 at 12:55
    
@stephan ok sir,as i am new to this i dont know that. from now onwards, i will follow it. Thank u. –  Madhan Nov 16 '09 at 13:00

Good one. a-b is obvious, but then checking whether a<b or a>b had me stumped for a while, if you don't use bit masks either... Good to get back to such things once i a while, keeps experience from disabling you to look for alternative solutions. ;) Here's what I came up with:

// -1 means a<b; 0 means a=b; 1 means a>b
char cmp(double a, double b)
{
    // (diff-1)/diff gives 1 or 2 if diff < 0 (e.g. -2/-1) = then a<b; 0 otherwise = a>b :
    return (a = a - b)
        ? (int)((a - 1) / a) ? -1 : 1
        : 0;
}
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    int a=2;
    int b=1;

    int c=a-b;

    switch(c) {
    case 0: System.out.println("equal");
    break;
    default:
        int min=Math.min(a, b);

        switch(a-min) {
        case 0: System.out.println("a lesser than b");
        break;
        default: System.out.println("a greater than b");
        }   
    }

With the first subtraction is checked if the two numbers are equals, because a-b=0 only if a and b are the same. So we are in the default case of the first switch only if a and b are different.
Now taking the min from a and b (here is the trick, there is an implicit if with logical operators inside the Math.min function) we can subtract a with this min. If the result is 0 that means a is smaller than b.
The last case is the remaining one, so a greater than b. With languages that accept integers in if clause (0-> false, other->true) is possible to use if instead of switch (not for java)

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You should probably explain your code. –  md5 Oct 20 '12 at 16:25
    
Done :) Is it clear? –  Riccardo Casatta Oct 31 '12 at 9:10
    
Is that C#? C has no System.out.println or Math.min. –  Keith Thompson May 13 '13 at 15:50
    
it's Java. Sorry i don't know C very well, but i think could be easily translated. it's the tecnique that matters, don't you think? –  Riccardo Casatta May 22 '13 at 10:01

Try this:

if(a-b)
printf("They are not equal");
else
printf("They are equal");
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