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In my page there is a button and a text box.

Originally I invoke a function by click the button. Now I also want to implement it by press Enter key as well. But it is not working. Press Enter key doesn't reach myFunction.

<script type="text/javascript">
     $(document).ready(function () {
         $("#txt1").keyup(function (event) {
         if (event.keyCode == 13) {
             $("#btn1").click(myFunction);
         }
     });
         $('#btn1').click(myFunction);

     });
     function myFunction() {
         // do something, press enter key doesn't reach here.
         })
     }
  </script>
share|improve this question
    
Please add your HTML side. – Ionică Bizău Jul 1 '13 at 18:49
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are almost right: Just invoke the handler with .click() or .trigger('click')

 $(document).ready(function () {
    $("#txt1").keyup(function (event) {
    if (event.which== 13) {
        $("#btn1").click(); // Just do a click.
     }
   });

     $('#btn1').click(myFunction); //Your handler is already registered here.

});
function myFunction() {
         // do something, press enter key doesn't reach here.

}

Also use event.which instead of event.keyCode when inside jquery event handler as it normalizes event.keyCode and event.charCode.

share|improve this answer
    
It is not working. Not sure why? – user1108948 Jul 1 '13 at 18:54
    
Can you replicate it in a fiddle? Any errors? – PSL Jul 1 '13 at 18:55
    
Here is a demo jsfiddle.net/WF9JR – PSL Jul 1 '13 at 18:56
    
@Love Why do you have it inside a form? Your form's default action is being executed and page reloads. – PSL Jul 1 '13 at 18:58
    
I GOT IT. THANKS. – user1108948 Jul 1 '13 at 18:59

Instead of

$("#btn1").click(myFunction);

I reccommend to use:

$("#btn1").on("click", function () {
   myFunction();
});

And then:

if (event.keyCode == 13) {
     $("#btn1").click(); //click the button
}

JSFIDDLE

share|improve this answer
1  
No reason to change the first part. All you will do is turn it more verbose and lose the this reference inside myFunction. – Fabrício Matté Jul 1 '13 at 18:52
    
@FabrícioMatté For me is more readable. I like it more than using inline style. – Ionică Bizău Jul 1 '13 at 18:54
    
Well yes, I like functional programming and the strong JS aspect of function objects being first-class citizens that you can pass references around. Okay that's mostly personal preference, though I just wanted to highlight that in case the this keyword or the original argument(s) (in this case the jQuery event object) is used inside myFunction it'd break in your modified approach. You should probably use myFunction.apply(this, arguments) but then it won't be "more readable" I'd guess. =] – Fabrício Matté Jul 1 '13 at 18:57

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