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I want to ask you what can cause this difference. If I compile the following programs and run THE SAME BINARIES - on some platforms the one resulted from C++ code is much faster than the Haskell one, on other the situation is opposite.

Additional there is a big difference in the performance of final binaries according to which platform they were built on. (Each platform uses the same flags and the same versions of LVM and clang)

The codes are optimized and should work with simmilar performance - see: Can Haskell optimize function calls the same way Clang / GCC does?.

I want to ask you, how is it possible.

C++ code:

#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>

int b(const int x){
    return x+5;
}

int c(const int x){
    return b(x)+1;
}

int d(const int x){
    return b(x)-1;
}

int a(const int x){
    return c(x) + d(x);
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){
    printf("Starting...\n");
    long int iternum = atol(argv[1]);
    long long int out = 0;
    for(long int i=1; i<=iternum;i++){
        out += a(iternum-i);
    }
    printf("%lld\n",out);
    printf("Done.\n");
}

compiled with clang++ -O3 main.cpp

haskell code:

module Main where
import qualified Data.Vector as V
import System.Environment
b :: Int -> Int
b x = x + 5
c x = b x + 1
d x = b x - 1
a x = c x + d x
main = do
   putStrLn "Starting..."
   args <- getArgs
   let iternum = read (head args) :: Int in do
      putStrLn $ show $ V.foldl' (+) 0 $ V.map (\i -> a (iternum-i))
         $ V.enumFromTo 1 iternum
      putStrLn "Done."

compiled with ghc -O3 --make -fforce-recomp -fllvm ghc-test.hs

RESULTS (testing THE SAME binaries on different platforms)

// binaries compiled on Ubuntu:
Ubuntu x64 @ Intel i7-3610QM CPU @ 2.30GHz : C++:0.775s, GHC:1.01s
Gentoo x64 @ Intel i7-Q720   CPU @ 1.6GHz  : C++:3.6s,   GHC:2.1s

// binaries compiled on Gentoo:
Ubuntu x64 @ Intel i7-3610QM CPU @ 2.30GHz : C++:0.782s, GHC:1.01s
Gentoo x64 @ Intel i7-Q720   CPU @ 1.6GHz  : C++:2.3s,   GHC:1.3s
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3  
The compilers' output could be optimized for different chip sets. I'll repeat what I said for your last question: check the assembly output. –  chrisaycock Jul 1 '13 at 19:41
    
@chrisaycock I didn't see your comment last time - I'll do it –  Wojciech Danilo Jul 1 '13 at 19:43
14  
@H2CO3: "C++ is a compiled language, Haskell is an interpreted one." This is false. GHC is a compiler. It produces native code. Languages are neither interpreted nor compiled inherently, but one can write an interpreter or compiler for any practical language, including C++. –  Dietrich Epp Jul 1 '13 at 19:44
6  
These are different systems, with different kernels, different characteristics, possibly different libraries you're linking to with different performance profiles. There's no reason to imagine they'll have the same performance profile! –  sclv Jul 1 '13 at 23:50
2  
Compile them 'static' to remove any difference caused by dynamic libraries. –  auselen Jul 2 '13 at 8:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 16 down vote accepted

If I compile the following programs and run THE SAME BINARIES - on some platforms the one resulted from C++ code is much faster than the Haskell one, on other the situation is opposite.

Additional there is a big difference in the performance of final binaries according to which platform they were built on. (Each platform uses the same flags and the same versions of LVM and clang)

You are seeing the impact of the pesky operational details of real computers:

  • linker optimizations
  • different versions of dynamically loaded libraries
  • quality of assembly code generation for a given micro architecture
  • access to specialized instructions
  • cache sizes
  • operating system scheduler, allocator, ...
  • memory latencies

There's a massive amount of code and hardware that differ between the two platforms, that means you end up measuring different things.

There is no reason to expect the performance to be the same, or even in the same ratio. For micro-benchmarks it is not unusual to flip relative orderings when moving platforms.

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