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I'd like to use fread in a (R)script that would get input data via the linux pipe mechanism. Is there an fread analog for the following?

read.csv(file = 'stdin', ...)

I'll also settle for reading stdin some other way and then using fread to parse it, as I mainly want this for fread's superior separator and header logic.

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4  
@eddi You've been around long enough to know what a reproducible example looks like. –  GSee Jul 1 '13 at 21:08
2  
@Arun, for starters, there's no data! –  GSee Jul 1 '13 at 21:12
5  
@eddi: The way you keep people from putting silly titles on your question is to provide a decent title to begin with. –  Robert Harvey Jul 1 '13 at 21:57
3  
@Arun I'm not sure what "apprehension" means in that sentence, but I didn't understand it because it didn't make sense. It only made sense when eddi answered his own question, which let me reverse engineer the question. –  Thomas Jul 2 '13 at 0:12
3  
@eddi, you might find this useful: stackoverflow.com/questions/15784373/process-substitution/… –  flodel Jul 2 '13 at 1:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Turns out it's as simple as:

fread('file:///dev/stdin')

This works, because fread actually creates a temporary file when the first 7 characters are "file://" or "http://" and uses download.file to copy the data there and then fread that.


Update: As of version 1.8.11 one can use shell commands in fread, making another solution possible:

fread('cat /dev/stdin')
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1  
I'm curious about the downvotes on this answer, an explanation would be appreciated. –  eddi Jul 1 '13 at 21:28
2  
+ 1 because I learnt something new. Sometimes I simply don't get Stackoverflow, still don't get why those downvotes, seriously. –  dickoa Jul 1 '13 at 22:45
    
Downvoting this is plain petty. Downvoting the Q is one thing, but the Answer. sigh. +1 –  Gavin Simpson Jul 2 '13 at 14:49

All of the read.* functions use 'scan' under their hoods. scan is fairly low level but does have the capacity for parsing lines of data into different classes.

> mat <- matrix(scan(), 4,4) # will paste in block of data 
1: 0.5 0.1428571 0.25
4: 0.5 0.1428571 0.25
7: 0.5 0.1428571 0.25
10: 0.5 0.1428571 0.25
13: 0.5 0.1428571 0.25
16: 0.5 
17:        # Terminate with two <cr>'s
Read 16 items
> mat
          [,1]      [,2]      [,3]      [,4]
[1,] 0.5000000 0.1428571 0.2500000 0.5000000
[2,] 0.1428571 0.2500000 0.5000000 0.1428571
[3,] 0.2500000 0.5000000 0.1428571 0.2500000
[4,] 0.5000000 0.1428571 0.2500000 0.5000000


> lst <- scan(what=list(double(0), "a"))
1: 4 t
2: 6 h
3:  8 l
4: 8 8
5: 
Read 4 records
> lst
[[1]]
[1] 4 6 8 8

[[2]]
[1] "t" "h" "l" "8"

You should also look at the ?connections page.

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thanks, scan is the first function I looked at, but I can't figure out how to combine it with fread –  eddi Jul 1 '13 at 21:03

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