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I'm trying to write a function that supports broadcasting and is fast at the same time. However, numpy's zero-rank arrays are causing trouble as usual. I couldn't find anything useful on google, or by searching here.

So, I'm asking you. How should I implement broadcasting efficiently and handle zero-rank arrays at the same time?

This whole post became larger than anticipated, sorry.

Details:

To clarify what I'm talking about I'll give a simple example:

Say I want to implement a Heaviside step-function. I.e. a function that acts on the real axis, which is 0 on the negative side, 1 on the positive side, and from case to case either 0, 0.5, or 1 at the point 0.

Implementation

Masking

The most efficient way I found so far is the following. It uses boolean arrays as masks to assign the correct values to the corresponding slots in the output vector.

from numpy import *

def step_mask(x, limit=+1):
    """Heaviside step-function.

    y = 0  if x < 0
    y = 1  if x > 0
    See below for x == 0.

    Arguments:
        x       Evaluate the function at these points.
        limit   Which limit at x == 0?
                limit >  0:  y = 1
                limit == 0:  y = 0.5
                limit <  0:  y = 0

    Return:
        The values corresponding to x.
    """
    b = broadcast(x, limit)

    out = zeros(b.shape)

    out[x>0] = 1

    mask = (limit > 0) & (x == 0)
    out[mask] = 1
    mask = (limit == 0) & (x == 0)
    out[mask] = 0.5
    mask = (limit < 0) & (x == 0)
    out[mask] = 0

    return out

List Comprehension

The following-the-numpy-docs way is to use a list comprehension on the flat iterator of the broadcast object. However, list comprehensions become absolutely unreadable for such complicated functions.

def step_comprehension(x, limit=+1):
    b = broadcast(x, limit)

    out = empty(b.shape)

    out.flat = [ ( 1 if x_ > 0 else
                  ( 0 if x_ < 0 else
                   ( 1 if l_ > 0 else
                    ( 0.5 if l_ ==0 else
                     ( 0 ))))) for x_, l_ in b ]

    return out

For Loop

And finally, the most naive way is a for loop. It's probably the most readable option. However, Python for-loops are anything but fast. And hence, a really bad idea in numerics.

def step_for(x, limit=+1):
    b = broadcast(x, limit)

    out = empty(b.shape)

    for i, (x_, l_) in enumerate(b):
        if x_ > 0:
            out[i] = 1
        elif x_ < 0:
            out[i] = 0
        elif l_ > 0:
            out[i] = 1
        elif l_ < 0:
            out[i] = 0
        else:
            out[i] = 0.5

    return out

Test

First of all a brief test to see if the output is correct.

>>> x = array([-1, -0.1, 0, 0.1, 1])
>>> step_mask(x, +1)
array([ 0.,  0.,  1.,  1.,  1.])
>>> step_mask(x, 0)
array([ 0. ,  0. ,  0.5,  1. ,  1. ])
>>> step_mask(x, -1)
array([ 0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  1.])

It is correct, and the other two functions give the same output.

Performance

How about efficiency? These are the timings:

In [45]: xl = linspace(-2, 2, 500001)

In [46]: %timeit step_mask(xl)
10 loops, best of 3: 19.5 ms per loop

In [47]: %timeit step_comprehension(xl)
1 loops, best of 3: 1.17 s per loop

In [48]: %timeit step_for(xl)
1 loops, best of 3: 1.15 s per loop

The masked version performs best as expected. However, I'm surprised that the comprehension is on the same level as the for loop.

Zero Rank Arrays

But, 0-rank arrays pose a problem. Sometimes you want to use a function scalar input. And preferably not have to worry about wrapping all scalars in at least 1-D arrays.

>>> step_mask(1)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<ipython-input-50-91c06aa4487b>", line 1, in <module>
    step_mask(1)
  File "script.py", line 22, in step_mask
    out[x>0] = 1
IndexError: 0-d arrays can't be indexed.

>>> step_for(1)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<ipython-input-51-4e0de4fcb197>", line 1, in <module>
    step_for(1)
  File "script.py", line 55, in step_for
    out[i] = 1
IndexError: 0-d arrays can't be indexed.

>>> step_comprehension(1)
array(1.0)

Only the list comprehension can handle 0-rank arrays. The other two versions would need special case handling for 0-rank arrays.

Numpy gets a bit messy when you want to use the same code for arrays and scalars. However, I really like to have functions that work on as arbitrary input as possible. Who knows which parameters I'll want to iterate over at some point.

Question:

What is the best way to implement a function as the one above? Is there a way to avoid if scalar then like special cases?

I'm not looking for a built-in Heaviside. It's just a simplified example. In my code the above pattern appears in many places to make parameter iteration as simple as possible without littering the client code with for loops or comprehensions.

Furthermore, I'm aware of Cython, or weave & Co., or implementation directly in C. However, the performance of the masked version above is sufficient for the moment. And for the moment I would like to keep things as simple as possible.

Update:

Following Ophion, and DaveP I improved the masked version as follows:

def step_mask_improved(x, limit=+1):
    b = np.broadcast(x, limit)
    out=atleast_1d(np.zeros(b.shape))

    out[np.where(x>0)]=1

    zeroindices=np.where(x==0)
    check=out[zeroindices]

    check=np.where(limit>0,1,check)
    check=np.where(limit==0,.5,check)
    check=np.where(limit<0,0,check)
    out[zeroindices]=check

    return out.reshape(b.shape)

It's as fast as Ophium's solution.

In [13]: %timeit step_mask(xl)
100 loops, best of 3: 11.1 ms per loop

In [14]: %timeit step_mask2(xl)
100 loops, best of 3: 9.11 ms per loop

In [15]: %timeit step_mask_improved(xl)
100 loops, best of 3: 9.13 ms per loop

But, it can handle zero-rank arrays and still return scalars if the input was scalar.

In [7]: step_mask_improved(1)
Out[7]: array(1.0)

Any more suggestions?

share|improve this question
3  
One way to handle these scalar cases is to use the numpy function atleast_1d, which will convert scalars to single element 1d arrays. It depends on whether you mind that your function will return an array when given a scalar. – DaveP Jul 2 '13 at 0:39
    
@DaveP Thanks, atleast_1d works well here. I've updated my post combining your comment and Ophium's answer. – Lemming Jul 2 '13 at 7:23
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Something to consider is to reduce the size of the array that your second check will be performed on. I am not sure how to get around the if scalar then statements.

def step_mask2(x,limit=+1):
    b = np.broadcast(x, limit)
    out=np.zeros(b.shape)

    out[np.where(x>0)]=1

    zeroindices=np.where(x==0)
    check=out[zeroindices]

    check=np.where(limit>0,1,check)
    check=np.where(limit==0,.5,check)
    check=np.where(limit<0,0,check)
    out[zeroindices]=check

    return out

Also is limit ever anything but a scalar? If not its probably better to do if statements instead of np.where.

Timing is slightly better:

Yours took 0.0330839157104 seconds.
Mine took 0.0210998058319 seconds.

To update using the atleast1d idea from DaveP:

def step_mask_improved(x, limit=+1):
    b = np.broadcast(x, limit)
    out=np.atleast_1d(np.zeros(b.shape))
    out[np.where(x>0)]=1

    zeroindices=np.where(x==0)
    check=out[zeroindices]

    check=np.where(limit>0,1,check)
    check=np.where(limit==0,.5,check)
    check=np.where(limit<0,0,check)
    out[zeroindices]=check

    return out

I am not sure why you reshape out- its what is causing the zero rank array to return to a scalar, but if its a problem.

    return np.atleast_1d(out.reshape(b.shape))
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I didn't know about where. I adapted your version and added atleast_1d as DaveP suggested in a comment to my question. I'll add it as an edit to my question. I'll wait a little before checking to see if someone comes with an even better solution. – Lemming Jul 2 '13 at 7:14
    
> Also is limit ever anything but a scalar? Yes, I have a 2-D array which contains a function for both limits. Of course it's a little more involved than a simple Heaviside function, but the concept is the same. I need simultaneous access to both limits. – Lemming Jul 2 '13 at 7:25
    
> I am not sure why you reshape out ... Without reshape step(1) would return array([1]), which is a 1-D array. With reshape, it returns array(1), which is a scalar. I think it's reasonable behavior to return a scalar to a scalar input, and a vector to a vector input for such a function. But, that's probably a matter of convention... – Lemming Jul 3 '13 at 12:50

Use numpy.where instead of indexing (where also tends to be a bit faster), for example replace:

out[mask] = 0.

with:

out = numpy.where(mask, 0., out)

When you do this, your function ends up looking something like this:

def step_mask(x, limit=+1):
    mask = x > 0
    out = where(mask, 1., 0.)

    # Save this result to avoid re-computing
    x_eq_zero = x == 0

    mask = (limit > 0) & x_eq_zero
    out = where(mask, 1, out)
    mask = (limit == 0) & x_eq_zero
    out = where(mask, .5, out)
    mask = (limit < 0) & x_eq_zero
    out = where(mask, 0, out)

    return out
share|improve this answer
    
I'm surprised to see, that the broadcast call can actually be omitted. However, the result is slower for large input, since you create new arrays very often. But, it natively handles scalars. On my PC it took 34.4ms compared to 9.13 of the update in my question, which can also handle scalars. – Lemming Jul 2 '13 at 7:37
    
Correction, I'm actually not sure why it's so much slower. – Lemming Jul 2 '13 at 7:43

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