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I do not understand how the script gets the next room, and generally how the "Engine" and "Map" classes work. Here's an excerpt:

Class Map(object):

    scenes = {
        'central_corridor': CentralCorridor(),
        'laser_weapon_armory': LaserWeaponArmory(),
        'the_bridge': TheBridge(),
        'escape_pod': EscapePod(),
        'death': Death()
    }

    def __init__(self, start_scene):
        self.start_scene = start_scene

    def next_scene(self, scene_name):
        return Map.scenes.get(scene_name)

    def opening_scene(self):
        return self.next_scene(self.start_scene)

class Engine(object):

    def __init__(self, scene_map):
        self.scene_map = scene_map

    def play(self):
        current_scene = self.scene_map.opening_scene()

        while True:
            print "\n--------"
            next_scene_name = current_scene.enter()
            current_scene = self.scene_map.next_scene(next_scene_name)

I simply don't understand how these portions work. I know how classes and object instances and attributes and all that other OOP stuff works, but for some reason this portion of the code I don't get. Mainly the Map class. If someone could explain it it would be awesome.

Also (this may require reading the exercise), why is it required to have these two classes anyway? Couldn't you just do it with class methods instead (i.e. methods without self as a param.)? Then you could just call, for example, CentralCorridor.enter(). In fact, that is how I solved it before reading the answer, and it worked out fine.

Sorry, my main question is how the Engine and Map classes work. The other thing is secondary.

Thanks in advance!

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3  
Without reading the exercise, I'd say that those classes are certainly not required to solve the problem in general. It's a design decision someone made. You might have chosen a different design, maybe even one that does not involve OOP at all. Design can be good or bad, better or worse. There are a few principles you can follow when designing a solution, for example the separation of concerns. –  Felix Kling Jul 1 '13 at 21:49
1  
I believe this is an example of bad usage of classes. Map could be replaced by its scenes attribute. Also it's clear that the Engine class shouldn't be a class. Any class that has only __init__ + a single method is really a complicated way of writing a function. –  Bakuriu Jul 1 '13 at 21:52
    
I haven't looked at the site where this exercise comes from, but the use of a class could be to make a foundation where it's use is more appropriate. This is, after all, called "Learn Python the Hard Way" :) –  Jason Sperske Jul 1 '13 at 22:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The Map object is a Class which maps your scenes. It has some scenes saved in an array.

scenes = {
    'central_corridor': CentralCorridor(),
    'laser_weapon_armory': LaserWeaponArmory(),
    'the_bridge': TheBridge(),
    'escape_pod': EscapePod(),
    'death': Death()
}

When an object of Map is made you also give it an opening scene as seen in the constructor

def __init__(self, start_scene):
    self.start_scene = start_scene

This creates a variable in Map called start_scene containing your opening scene.

Furthermore Map has 2 methods

# This one returns a scene based on its name or key in the scenes array
def next_scene(self, scene_name):
    return Map.scenes.get(scene_name)


# And this one  returns the opening scene which is set when you create the map.
def opening_scene(self):
    return self.next_scene(self.start_scene)

The Engine seems to be controlling the scenes when to play and what to play.

# When creating an Engine object you give the map containing scenes to its constructor
def __init__(self, scene_map):
        self.scene_map = scene_map

# The method which starts playing the scenes
def play(self):

    # the opening scene from the map is selected as the current scene
    current_scene = self.scene_map.opening_scene()

     # You loop all the scenes probably, conditions of this loop are unknown because you haven't posted it entirely.
     while True:
         print "\n--------"
         # It seems the next scene name is known in the current scene
         next_scene_name = current_scene.enter()

         # It replaces current scene with the next scene from the map
         current_scene = self.scene_map.next_scene(next_scene_name)

why is it required to have these two classes anyway?

It isn't, unless it's required according to your assignment

Like you said it's possible to do it without, BUT there are good reasons to do so.

This way you make 2 separate classes with their own responsibilities. This way code is more readable when the application gets bigger and bigger. And it's easy to navigate through the application. You can easily change parts of your app etc etc. My advice is to keep practicing and reading about OOP, you will notice why you do the things you see.

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1  
It has some static scenes The word 'static' is a term of art in OOP, which means it has certain connotations, which do not apply to what you are talking about, and therefore it may be confusing and non-sensical. –  7stud Jul 1 '13 at 22:07
    
Wrong use of terminology, English isn't my native language and I was struggling what to call it without using the word static. Fixed maybe? Or "previously set"? Almost all my english contains terminology from my job. Today I called a book index a ListView *facepalm –  Tim Dev Jul 1 '13 at 22:09
    
Ohhhhhhhhh..... It just clicked. Thank you! I couldn't wrap my mind around it. I think it was all that dot notation over dot notation. –  Aristides Jul 1 '13 at 22:09
    
I know how you feel, sometimes your brain just freezes and you see 2000 lines of gibberish :) Get some fresh air, eat something or have a good night sleep. And BAM everything becomes clear ;) –  Tim Dev Jul 1 '13 at 22:11

The Map class has a dictionary of scene names that are keys, and instances of different classes as the values. To retrieve one of the instances, you call a method passing in a string that is the scene name. The Map class then returns an instance of the corresponding class.

Couldn't you just do it with class methods instead (i.e. methods without self as a param.)? Then you could just call, for example, CentralCorridor.enter().

Yes, you could. The downside is that now you have hard coded the names of your scene classes in your code. If you later decide to rewrite your program to remove some scenes or add other scenes, you have to change all the places in your code where you hard coded the names. If you employ the Map class, then changes only have to be made to the dictionary. Although, you would still have to eliminate method calls that try to retrieve class instances that you've removed. Or, you could have the next_scene() method deal with attempts to retrieve scenes you've removed from the dictionary.

Another consideration with class methods is: will you need to store 'state'? Like, how many players are currently in the scene. And, will you need to create more than one scene of that type?

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this answer is great for the second part of the question, thanks! –  Aristides Jul 1 '13 at 22:18

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