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I'm writing a simple algorithm to check the primality of an integer and I'm having a problem translating this Java code into Python:

for (int i = 3; i < Math.sqrt(n); i += 2) {
    if (n % i == 0)
        return false;
}

So, I've been trying to use this, but I'm obviously skipping the division by 3:

i = 3
while (i < int(math.sqrt(n))):
    i += 2  # where do I put this?
    if (n % i == 0):
        return False
share|improve this question
1  
for (a; b; c) { _ } -> a; while(b) { _; c; } - barring scoping issues and having to deal with continue. The last component of the for-each construct is evalutated after each evaluation of the loop body. – user2246674 Jul 1 '13 at 23:28
    
You might want to take a look at blog.startifact.com/posts/older/what-is-pythonic.html in reference to wanting to translate java (or other languages) to python - don't forget to be pythonic! – Singular1ty Jul 1 '13 at 23:28
up vote 15 down vote accepted

The only for-loop in Python is technically a "for-each", so you can use something like

for i in xrange(3, int(math.sqrt(n)), 2):  # use 'range' in Python 3
    if n % i == 0:
        return False

Of course, Python can do better than that:

all(n % i for i in xrange(3, int(math.sqrt(n)), 2))

would be equivalent as well (assuming there's a return true at the end of that Java loop). Indeed, the latter would be considered the Pythonic way to approach it.


Reference:

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Why is i%3 being used? – hexafraction Jul 1 '13 at 23:27
    
@hexafraction That was my mistake, thanks for spotting it. – arshajii Jul 1 '13 at 23:28
    
Python has while loops… Or am I misinterpreting part of your answer? – mipadi Jul 1 '13 at 23:31
3  
@mipadi I think he meant Python doesn't have the C-like for loop that merges an initializer, stop condition, and step statement. That is: the only for in Python is a foreach. – millimoose Jul 1 '13 at 23:33
    
Indeed, I clarified that statement. – arshajii Jul 1 '13 at 23:33

A direct translation would be:

for i in range(3, int(math.sqrt(n)), 2):
    if n % i == 0:
        return False
share|improve this answer

In a Java for loop, the step (the i += 2 part in your example) occurs at the end of the loop, just before it repeats. Translated to a while, your for loop would be equivalent to:

int i = 3;
while (i < Math.sqrt(n)) {
    if (n % i == 0) {
        return false;
    }
    i += 2;
}

Which in Python is similar:

i = 3
while i < math.sqrt(n):
    if n % i == 0:
        return False
    i += 2

However, you can make this more "Pythonic" and easier to read by using Python's xrange function, which allows you to specify a step parameter:

for i in xrange(3, math.sqrt(n), 2):
    if n % i == 0:
        return False
share|improve this answer

Use a basic Python for i in range loop:

for i in range(3, math.round(math.sqrt(x)), 2):
    if (n % i == 0):
        return false
share|improve this answer

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