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If I'm working in (terminal) Emacs and have 2 buffers on screen using a horizontal split:

+--------------------------+
|                          |
|                          |
|                          |
|                          |
+--------------------------+
|                          |
|                          |
|                          |
|                          |
+--------------------------+

Then I decide to open the slime repl, Emacs will split one of those horizontal panes vertically:

+--------------------------+
|                          |
|                          |
|                          |
|                          |
+-------------+------------+
|             |            |
|             |  slime     |
|             |            |
|             |            |
+-------------+------------+

But what I want is to have slime on the right, using the full height of the window:

+-------------+------------+
|             |            |
|             |            |
|             |            |
|             |            |
+-------------+  slime     |
|             |            |
|             |            |
|             |            |
|             |            |
+-------------+------------+

Is there any easy way to get from the arrangement Emacs automatically gave me, to the one I want (e.g. a rotate arrangement), or do I explicitly close and re-split the windows myself?

EDIT | Also curious if I can directly open a full vertical split if I'm currently using a full horizontal split, or if it's effectively impossible.

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3 Answers 3

There are certainly libraries for transforming a frame's window configuration (flip, rotate, etc...), and other libraries for rotating the visible buffers through the available windows. Combining those would achieve your aim.

I like TransposeFrame for the former, and I can see at least a couple of options for the latter:

In general, CategoryWindows on the Wiki should be useful to you.

Note that the window configuration transforms do need to delete and re-create the splits, so the original window objects do not all survive the process. In that respect, it's not actually possible to do what you're asking; but for most purposes, 'faking it' is sufficient.

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If you like pre-set window configurations, take a look at the "workspace management" pakages:

There is more on the project management page on EmacsWiki.

To your second question, here is what I have in my configuration to flip horizontal/vertical splits (credit: https://github.com/yyr/emacs.d):

(defun split-window-func-with-other-buffer (split-function)
  (lexical-let ((s-f split-function))
    (lambda ()
      (interactive)
      (funcall s-f)
      (set-window-buffer (next-window) (other-buffer)))))

(defun split-window-horizontally-instead ()
  (interactive)
  (save-excursion
    (delete-other-windows)
    (funcall (split-window-func-with-other-buffer 'split-window-horizontally))))

(defun split-window-vertically-instead ()
  (interactive)
  (save-excursion
    (delete-other-windows)
    (funcall (split-window-func-with-other-buffer 'split-window-vertically))))

(global-set-key "\C-x|" 'split-window-horizontally-instead)
(global-set-key "\C-x_" 'split-window-vertically-instead)
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I can't find split-window-func-with-other-buffer? Is it from here? –  Miserable Variable Jul 2 '13 at 16:58
    
I am sorry I forgot to include the function. It does come from the source you mentioned. See the edited version. –  Alex Vorobiev Jul 2 '13 at 20:16

Here's a function that does what you want. After loading it into emacs, select the buffer you want to rearrange and do an M-x my-shift-window-right. You can also bind it to a key with global-set-key.

(defun my-shift-window-right (&optional start-window)
  "Reset the current window configuration with START-WINDOW
on the right and the rest of the windows on the left. START-WINDOW defaults to
the selected window. Return START-WINDOW, or nil if START-WINDOW isn't live or
if there is only one visible window."
  (interactive (list (selected-window)))
  (if (or (one-window-p)
          (and start-window
               (not (window-live-p start-window)))) nil
    (let ((other-buffers '())
          (start-window (or start-window (selected-window))))
      ;; add all visible buffers other than the current one to other-buffers list
      (walk-windows #'(lambda (window)
                        (when (not (eq window start-window))
                          (add-to-list 'other-buffers (window-buffer window)))))
      (delete-other-windows)
      ;; pop the first "other buffer" into a split window on the left
      (set-window-buffer (select-window (split-window start-window nil 'left))
                         (pop other-buffers))
      ;; make a split window for each buffer in the "other-buffers" list
      ;; select the start-window and return it when finished
      (dolist (buffer other-buffers (select-window start-window))
        (set-window-buffer (split-window (selected-window) nil 'above) buffer)))))

This function cycles through the other visible windows and stores each of their buffers in a list called other-buffers. Then it rearranges the windows the way you described by iterating over the other-buffers list.

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