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Switch statement fallthrough is one of my personal major reasons for loving switch vs. if/else if constructs. An example is in order here:

static string NumberToWords(int number)
{
    string[] numbers = new string[] 
        { "", "one", "two", "three", "four", "five", 
          "six", "seven", "eight", "nine" };
    string[] tens = new string[] 
        { "", "", "twenty", "thirty", "forty", "fifty", 
          "sixty", "seventy", "eighty", "ninety" };
    string[] teens = new string[]
        { "ten", "eleven", "twelve", "thirteen", "fourteen", "fifteen",
          "sixteen", "seventeen", "eighteen", "nineteen" };

    string ans = "";
    switch (number.ToString().Length)
    {
        case 3:
            ans += string.Format("{0} hundred and ", numbers[number / 100]);
        case 2:
            int t = (number / 10) % 10;
            if (t == 1)
            {
                ans += teens[number % 10];
                break;
            }
            else if (t > 1)
                ans += string.Format("{0}-", tens[t]);
        case 1:
            int o = number % 10;
            ans += numbers[o];

            break;
        default:
            throw new ArgumentException("number");
    }
    return ans;
}

The smart people are cringing because the string[]s should be declared outside the function: well, they are, this is just an example.

The compiler fails with the following error:

Control cannot fall through from one case label ('case 3:') to another
Control cannot fall through from one case label ('case 2:') to another

Why? And is there any way to get this sort of behaviour without having three ifs?

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2  
Removed from C# because it's a huge source of defects in the other languages; most programmers will overlook the subtlety of ordering of case statements. It still smells bad, but at least the goto makes it explicit and case labels can be reordered safely. It's still a very awkward style though. –  Robert Paulson Oct 6 '08 at 19:46
63  
This is by far one of the stupidest conventions for .NET to have ever made. They took a very well known axiom, case fall through and destroyed it. It's clear they did it to protect idiot developers from themselves and punish those who understand the uses for case fall through. They easily could've limited this by having switch and switchf that allows the fall through where switch does not. –  Chris Marisic Jan 20 '11 at 20:24
8  
@Chris Two different control statements just to appease developers who want their switch statements to work in a slightly different way? That's a terrible idea. VB had that mentality for loops, and it worked out terribly. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Aug 28 '12 at 16:35

13 Answers 13

up vote 297 down vote accepted

(Copy/paste of an answer I provided elsewhere)

Falling through switch-cases can be achieved by having no code in a case (see case 0), or using the special goto case (see case 1) or goto default (see case 2) forms:

switch (/*...*/) {
    case 0: // shares the exact same code as case 1
    case 1:
        // do something
        goto case 2;
    case 2:
        // do something else
        goto default;
    default:
        // do something entirely different
        break;
}
share|improve this answer
51  
I think that, in this particular instance, goto is not considered harmful. –  Thomas Owens Oct 6 '08 at 19:32
28  
Damn - I've been programming with C# since the early days of 1.0, and I've never seen this until now. Just goes to show, you learn new things every day. –  BrightUmbra Feb 5 '09 at 3:30
10  
It's all good, Erik. The only reason /I/ knew about it is that I'm compiler theory nerd who read the ECMA-334 specs with a magnifying glass. –  Alex Lyman Feb 6 '09 at 10:19
47  
Wow... I just used a goto in my code. Should I feel dirty? –  Armstrongest Nov 8 '10 at 19:15
7  
@Dancrumb: At the time that the feature was written, C# had not yet added any "soft" keywords (like 'yield', 'var', 'from', and 'select'), so they had three real options: 1) make 'fallthrough' a hard keyword (you cant use it as a variable name), 2) write code necessary to support such an soft keyword, 3) use already reserved keywords. #1 was a big issue for those porting code; #2 was a fairly large engineering task, from what I understand; and the option they went with, #3 had a side benefit: other devs reading the code after the fact could learn about the feature from the base concept of goto –  Alex Lyman Oct 14 '11 at 19:43

Switch fallthrough is historically one of the major source of bugs in modern softwares. The language designer decided to make it mandatory to jump at the end of the case, unless you are defaulting to the next case directly without processing.

switch(value)
{
    case 1:// this is still legal
    case 2:
}
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8  
I well never understand why that isn't "case 1, 2:" –  BCS Feb 9 '09 at 23:02
    
@BCS Its because the case statement is actually a label. –  David Pfeffer Oct 18 '10 at 13:40
6  
@David Pfeffer: Yup it is, and so is case 1, 2: in languages that allow that. What I will never understand is why any modern language would't choose to allow that. –  BCS Oct 18 '10 at 13:54
    
@BCS with the goto statement, multiple comma separated options could be tricky to handle? –  penguat Sep 13 '11 at 12:44
    
@pengut: it might be more accurate to say that case 1, 2: is a single label but with multiple names. -- FWIW, I think most languages that forbid fall through don't special case the "consecutive case labels" indium but rather treat the case labels as an annotation on the next statement and require the last statement before a statement labeled with (one or more) case labels to be a jump. –  BCS Sep 13 '11 at 16:23

The "why" is to avoid accidental fall-through, for which I'm grateful. This is a not uncommon source of bugs in C and pre-1.5 Java.

The workaround is to use goto, e.g.

switch (number.ToString().Length)
{
    case 3:
        ans += string.Format("{0} hundred and ", numbers[number / 100]);
        goto case 2;
    case 2:
    // Etc
}

The general design of switch/case is a little bit unfortunate in my view. It stuck too close to C - there are some useful changes which could be made in terms of scoping etc. Arguably a smarter switch which could do pattern matching etc would be helpful, but that's really changing from switch to "check a sequence of conditions" - at which point a different name would perhaps be called for.

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This is the difference between switch and if/elseif in my mind. Switch is for checking various states of a single variable, whereas if/elseif can be used to check any number of things that connected, but not necessarily a single, or the same variable. –  Matthew Scharley Oct 6 '08 at 13:19
7  
Pattern matching in C# would be spectacular... –  BrightUmbra Feb 5 '09 at 3:29
1  
If it was to prevent accidental fall through then I feel a compiler warning would have been better. Just like you have one if your if statement has an assignment: if (result = true) { } –  Tal Even-Tov Nov 12 '13 at 11:38
    
@TalEven-Tov: Compiler warnings should really be for cases where you can almost always fix the code to be better. Personally I'd prefer implicit breaking, so it wouldn't be a problem to start with, but that's a different matter. –  Jon Skeet Nov 12 '13 at 11:52

You can 'goto case label' http://www.blackwasp.co.uk/CSharpGoto.aspx

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They left out this behaviour by design to avoid when it was not used by will but caused problems.

It can be used only if there is no statement in the case part, like:

switch (whatever)
{
    case 1:
    case 2:
    case 3: boo; break;
}
share|improve this answer

To add to the answers here, I think it's worth considering the opposite question in conjunction with this, viz. why did C allow fall-through in the first place?

Any programming language of course serves two goals:

  1. Provide instructions to the computer.
  2. Leave a record of the intentions of the programmer.

The creation of any programming language is therefore a balance between how to best serve these two goals. On the one hand, the easier it is to turn into computer instructions (whether those are machine code, bytecode like IL, or the instructions are interpreted on execution) then more able that process of compilation or interpretation will be to be efficient, reliable and compact in output. Taken to its extreme, this goal results in our just writing in assembly, IL, or even raw op-codes, because the easiest compilation is where there is no compilation at all.

Conversely, the more the language expresses the intention of the programmer, rather than the means taken to that end, the more understandable the program both when writing and during maintenance.

Now, switch could always have been compiled by converting it into the equivalent chain of if-else blocks or similar, but it was designed as allowing compilation into a particular common assembly pattern where one takes a value, computes an offset from it (whether by looking up a table indexed by a perfect hash of the value, or by actual arithmetic on the value*). It's worth noting at this point that today, C# compilation will sometimes turn switch into the equivalent if-else, and sometimes use a hash-based jump approach (and likewise with C, C++, and other languages with comparable syntax).

In this case there are two good reasons for allowing fall-through:

  1. It just happens naturally anyway: if you build a jump table into a set of instructions, and one of the earlier batches of instructions doesn't contain some sort of jump or return, then execution will just naturally progress into the next batch. Allowing fall-through was what would "just happen" if you turned the switch-using C into jump-table–using machine code.

  2. Coders who wrote in assembly were already used to the equivalent: when writing a jump table by hand in assembly, they would have to consider whether a given block of code would end with a return, a jump outside of the table, or just continue on to the next block. As such, having the coder add an explicit break when necessary was "natural" for the coder too.

At the time therefore, it was a reasonable attempt to balance the two goals of a computer language as it relates to both the produced machine code, and the expressiveness of the source code.

Four decades later though, things are not quite the same, for a few reasons:

  1. Coders in C today may have little or no assembly experience. Coders in many other C-style languages are even less likely to (especially Javascript!). Any concept of "what people are used to from assembly" is no longer relevant.
  2. Improvements in optimisations mean that the likelihood of switch either being turned into if-else because it was deemed the approach likely to be most efficient, or else turned into a particularly esoteric variant of the jump-table approach are higher. The mapping between the higher- and lower-level approaches is not as strong as it once was.
  3. Experience has shown that fall-through tends to be the minority case rather than the norm (a study of Sun's compiler found 3% of switch blocks used a fall-through other multiple labels on the same block, and it was thought that the use-case here meant that this 3% was in fact much higher than normal). So the language as studied make the unusual more readily catered-to than the common.
  4. Experience has shown that fall-through tends to be the source of problems both in cases where it is accidentally done, and also in cases where correct fall-through is missed by someone maintaining the code. This latter is a subtle addition to the bugs associated with fall-through, because even if your code is perfectly bug-free, your fall-through can still cause problems.

Related to those last two points, consider the following quote from the current edition of K&R:

Falling through from one case to another is not robust, being prone to disintegration when the program is modified. With the exception of multiple labels for a single computation, fall-throughs should be used sparingly, and commented.

As a matter of good form, put a break after the last case (the default here) even though it's logically unnecessary. Some day when another case gets added at the end, this bit of defensive programming will save you.

So, from the horse's mouth, fall-through in C is problematic. It's considered good practice to always document fall-throughs with comments, which is an application of the general principle that one should document where one does something unusual, because that's what will trip later examination of the code and/or make your code look like it has a novice's bug in it when it is in fact correct.

And when you think about it, code like this:

switch(x)
{
  case 1:
   foo();
   /* FALLTHRU */
  case 2:
    bar();
    break;
}

Is adding something to make the fall-through explicit in the code, it's just not something that can be detected (or whose absence can be detected) by the compiler.

As such, the fact that on has to be explicit with fall-through in C# doesn't add any penalty to people who wrote well in other C-style languages anyway, since they would already be explicit in their fall-throughs.†

Finally, the use of goto here is already a norm from C and other such languages:

switch(x)
{
  case 0:
  case 1:
  case 2:
    foo();
    goto below_six;
  case 3:
    bar();
    goto below_six;
  case 4:
    baz();
    /* FALLTHRU */
  case 5:
  below_six:
    qux();
    break;
  default:
    quux();
}

In this sort of case where we want a block to be included in the code executed for a value other than just that which brings one to the preceding block, then we're already having to use goto. (Of course, there are means and ways of avoiding this with different conditionals but that's true of just about everything relating to this question). As such C# built on the already normal way to deal with one situation where we want to hit more than one block of code in a switch, and just generalised it to cover fall-through as well. It also made both cases more convenient and self-documenting, since we have to add a new label in C but can use the case as a label in C#. In C# we can get rid of the below_six label and use goto case 5 which is clearer as to what we are doing. (We'd also have to add break for the default, which I left out just to make the above C code clearly not C# code).

In summary therefore:

  1. C# no longer relates to unoptimised compiler output as directly as C code did 40 years ago (nor does C these days), which makes one of the inspirations of fall-through irrelevant.
  2. C# remains compatible with C in not just having implicit break, for easier learning of the language by those familiar with similar languages, and easier porting.
  3. C# removes a possible source of bugs or misunderstood code that has been well-documented as causing problems for the last four decades.
  4. C# makes existing best-practice with C (document fall through) enforceable by the compiler.
  5. C# makes the unusual case the one with more explicit code, the usual case the one with the code one just writes automatically.
  6. C# uses the same goto-based approach for hitting the same block from different case labels as is used in C. It just generalises it to some other cases.
  7. C# makes that goto-based approach more convenient, and clearer, than it is in C, by allowing case statements to act as labels.

All in all, a pretty reasonable design decision


*Some forms of BASIC would allow one to do the likes of GOTO (x AND 7) * 50 + 240 which while brittle and hence a particularly persuasive case for banning goto, does serve to show a higher-language equivalent of the sort of way that lower-level code can make a jump based on arithmetic upon a value, which is much more reasonable when it's the result of compilation rather than something that has to be maintained manually. Implementations of Duff's Device in particular lend themselves well to the equivalent machine code or IL because each block of instructions will often be the same length without needing the addition of nop fillers.

†Duff's Device comes up here again, as a reasonable exception. The fact that with that and similar patterns there's a repetition of operations serves to make the use of fall-through relatively clear even without an explicit comment to that effect.

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They changed the switch statement (from C/Java/C++) behavior for c#. I guess the reasoning was that people forgot about the fall through and errors were caused. One book I read said to use goto to simulate, but this doesn't sound like a good solution to me.

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C# supports goto, but not fallthrough? Wow. And it's not just those. C# is the only language that I know of that behaves this way. –  Matthew Scharley Oct 6 '08 at 13:06
    
I didn't exactly like it at first, but "fall-thru" is really a recipe for disaster (especially amongst junior programmers.) As many have pointed out, C# still allows fall-thru for empty lines (which is the majority of cases.) "Kenny" posted a link that highlights elegant Goto use with switch-case. –  Pretzel Oct 6 '08 at 13:39
    
It's not a huge deal in my opinion. 99% of the time I don't want a fall through and I have been burned by bugs in the past. –  Ken Oct 6 '08 at 14:08
    
"this doesn't sound like a good solution to me" -- sorry to hear that about you, because that's what goto case is for. Its advantage over fallthrough is that it is explicit. That some people here object to goto case just shows that they were indoctrinated against "goto" without any understanding of the issue and are incapable of thinking on their own. When Dijkstra wrote "GOTO Considered Harmful", he was addressing languages that didn't have any other means of changing control flow. –  Jim Balter Oct 24 '13 at 9:03
    
@JimBalter and then how many people who quote Dijkstra on that will quote Knuth that "premature optimisation is the root of all evil" though that quote was when Knuth was explicitly writing about how useful goto can be when optimising code? –  Jon Hanna Dec 8 '13 at 15:00

After each case statement require break or goto statement even if it is a default case.

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2  
If only someone had posted that two years earlier! –  Poldie Mar 13 '12 at 15:25
    
@Poldie it was funny the first time... Shilpa you don't require a break or goto for every case, just for every case with it's own code. You can have multiple cases that share code just fine. –  Maverick Oct 14 '13 at 22:05

A jump statement such as a break is required after each case block, including the last block whether it is a case statement or a default statement. With one exception, (unlike the C++ switch statement), C# does not support an implicit fall through from one case label to another. The one exception is if a case statement has no code.

-- C# switch() documentation

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1  
I realise this behaviour is documented, I want to know WHY it is the way it is, and any alternatives to get the old behaviour. –  Matthew Scharley Oct 6 '08 at 13:05

C# doesn't support fall through with switch/case statements. Not sure why, but there's really no support for it. Linkage

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This is so wrong. See the other answers ... the effect of an implicit fallthrough can be obtained with an explicit goto case. This was an intentional, wise design choice by the C# designers. –  Jim Balter Oct 24 '13 at 9:09

You can achieve fall through like c++ by the goto keyword.

EX:

switch(num)
{
   case 1:
      goto case 3;
   case 2:
      goto case 3;
   case 3:
      //do something
      break;
   case 4:
      //do something else
      break;
   case default:
      break;
}
share|improve this answer
7  
If only someone had posted that two years earlier! –  Poldie Mar 13 '12 at 15:25

Just a quick note to add that the compiler for Xamarin actually got this wrong and it allows fallthrough. It has supposedly been fixed, but has not been released. Discovered this in some code that actually was falling through and the compiler did not complain.

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You forgot to add the "break;" statement into case 3. In case 2 you wrote it into the if block. Therefore try this:

case 3:            
{
    ans += string.Format("{0} hundred and ", numbers[number / 100]);
    break;
}


case 2:            
{
    int t = (number / 10) % 10;            
    if (t == 1)            
    {                
        ans += teens[number % 10];                
    }            
    else if (t > 1)                
    {
        ans += string.Format("{0}-", tens[t]);        
    }
    break;
}

case 1:            
{
    int o = number % 10;            
    ans += numbers[o];            
    break;        
}

default:            
{
    throw new ArgumentException("number");
}
share|improve this answer
2  
This produces vastly wrong output. I left the switch statements out by design. The question is why the C# compiler sees this as an error when almost no other language has this restriction. –  Matthew Scharley Oct 6 '08 at 13:13
    
What a stunning failure to comprehend. And you have had 5 years to delete this and still haven't done so? Mindboggling. –  Jim Balter Oct 24 '13 at 9:07

protected by Matthew Scharley Aug 31 '11 at 2:18

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