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I'm trying to obfuscate the URLs to the pages where content is displayed. Content pages are displayed by getting the content id number as a GET variable in the URL. I want to obfuscate the URL (as is described by this SO post). I tried the methods in both answers but one method gave overly long codes, and the other gave overly predictable codes.

I'm working in PHP, and I'm using a MySQL table to store content; the content id is an automatically incrementing column. This means that if I didn't obfuscate my URLs users would be able to see in the URL exactly how many posts there are on the website, and could change the URL to see different posts. I want to avoid this.

I was hoping to have obfuscation similar to Imgur.com: their content ID codes are each a 5-character code containing letters, capital letters and lowercase letters.

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1  
Make random letter sequences, and store an association to your ids in the database? –  mario Jul 2 '13 at 0:28
    
@VijayRamamurthy FYI your find its up to 7 characters now with letters and numbers, it will be 8 when no permutations left, and so on. –  Lawrence Cherone Jul 2 '13 at 0:37

3 Answers 3

To avoid needing to do a bunch of "encrypting" and "decrypting" you can use a unique key-pair for each page. Add another field (VARCHAR 5) to your pages table called key and then randomly generate a key for each page.

To generate the key you could crypt a random number

function random_key(){
    $crypt = crypt(rand(0,9999999), 'Whatever you want to say here.');
    return substr($crypt, 0, 5);
}

Which would result in a URL like ?page=55-so3ph (?page={$id}-{$key})

And then to use it you can do something like

<?php

if(empty($_GET['page']))
    die('missing ?page');

$page = explode('-', $_GET['page']);

if(count($page) != 2)
    die('invalid ?page');

list($page_id, $page_key) = $page;

if(!is_numeric($page_id))
    die('invalid page id');

$Post = your_query_method('SELECT * FROM pages WHERE id = ' . $page_id . ' AND key = "' . your_escape_function($page_key) . '"');

if(!$Post){
    header('Location: /invalid_page.html');
    exit;
}

//At this point we know that they ID key pair is correct
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I realize I could do this; I would prefer not to for indexing reasons. –  Vijay Ramamurthy Jul 2 '13 at 1:21
    
@VijayRamamurthy What are the indexing reasons, specifically? –  Jeremy Jul 2 '13 at 3:03
    
@Nile, I agree... seems low impact to me at least. You could save the random integer generated instead and just rehash it when you go to verify. Get the post by ID and then hash the key number and compare with url key. –  azBrian Jul 2 '13 at 4:57
    
I realize that this method is low-impact and it wouldn't affect the speed of my MySQL queries too much, but I just don't want to do it this way. I want to encode the id to get a code in the URL, then decode the code in the URL when I need to. –  Vijay Ramamurthy Jul 2 '13 at 12:56
1  
"the other gave overly predictable codes" put me under the impression you did. –  azBrian Jul 3 '13 at 22:58

For a super simple solution that does not really prevent people from reverse engineering your URLs but will deter 99.9999% of users you can do something like

<?php
function hash_id($id){
    $crypt = crypt($id, 'Whatever you want to say here. Just SALT it!');
    $md5   = md5($crypt . 'You can do another SALT here.');
    return substr($md5, 0, 5);
}

if(empty($_GET['page']))
    die('missing ?page');

$page = explode('-', $_GET['page']);

if(count($page) != 2)
    die('invalid ?page');

list($page_id, $page_key) = $page;

if(!is_numeric($page_id))
    die('invalid page id');

$Page = your_function_to_get_page_by_id($page_id);

if(!$Page || hash_id($page_id) != $page_key){
    header('Location: /invalid_page.html');
    exit;
}

//the URL would look like ?page=55-so3ph

Between crypt and md5 with salts, it would take somebody with a super computer a good chunk of time to start finding the collisions.

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What I've ended up doing is quite simple: I cipher the number (ensuring that the output of the cipher is within a certain range) then I convert the number to base 62.

I chose base 62 because the characters in base 62 are numerics, capital alphabets, and lowercase alphabets. I ensured the output of the cipher was within a certain range so that when converted to base 62 it would have a certain number of digits (in my case I chose six digits in base 62).

To reverse the code, I convert it back to base 10 and reverse the cipher.

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