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.NET provides an asynchronous pattern - IAsyncResult, BeginMethod(), EndMethod(). I'm just wondering using this pattern is always better than using the corresponding synchronous pattern - just calling Method().

In the case of dealing with UI, definitely using the asynchronous pattern wins over the synchronous pattern because while jobs in Method() are being done, other tasks can be handled in the current thread.

But what if we are developing a server. Let's suppose Method() makes a DB call and the current thread dealing with Method() has nothing to do before getting a result from the DB call. In this case, I think using synchronous pattern would be better than the asynchronous pattern because we could save some overhead required for the asynchronous pattern.

What do you think? Using async patterns is always better (in perspective of saving resources) than using sync patterns even for the server development in all cases?

Thanks

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Robert Rouhani, zespri, Code Lღver, Riccardo Marotti, Luv Jul 2 '13 at 6:27

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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But what if we are developing a server. Let's suppose Method() makes a DB call and the current thread dealing with Method() has nothing to do before getting a result from the DB call. In this case, I think using synchronous pattern would be better than the asynchronous pattern because we could save some overhead required for the asynchronous pattern.

Provided the async method call is async because it's waiting on IO, using asynchronous methods on the server is a big win. The server can free up and reuse the current thread waiting for the async method call to complete, which uses a signal for notification.

Asynchronous methods when the method is IO bound can dramatically increase scalability on a server.

That being said, I would steer away from IAsyncResult and the APM, and instead use the Task-based asynchronous patterns (single methods returning Task<T>) combined with the new composibility features provided by the language in C# 5 (async/await keywords). These are particularly nice when implementing server-side methods asynchronously, as making a method that returns Task<T> with await can be done with nearly the same control flow as a synchronous method.

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Thanks for your reply. Do you think "await" is really useful even for the server programming? In my case, most of the time, the call flow cannot proceed without results of I/O calls (e.g., DB calls), so task.Wait() (Here, you can think task = Task.Factory.StartNew(Method())) is frequently used instead of await. –  soleiljy Jul 2 '13 at 1:50
    
@soleiljy: await is extremely useful for server programming, but only if you use it everywhere (if the top-level methods return tasks). It allows you to wait for operations without wasting a thread. You should never call Wait(). –  SLaks Jul 4 '13 at 20:21
    
@soleiljy You should (almost) never use Task.Factory.StartNew in server programming, but await/async is incredibly useful. The key is making the server methods async themselves, so await frees up the threads. –  Reed Copsey Jul 4 '13 at 21:28

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