Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What I want to implement is something like:

switch(flag)
{
    case 1:
          var query=from w in db.someTable
                    select w;
          break;
    case 2:
          query=from w in db.someTable
                    where w.id==someID
                    select w;
          break;
    case default:
          break;
}

But it cannot compile correctly. If I add a var before the second query, it prompts that query has been declared. Do I have to change the variable name? Such like: query1 in case1, query2 in case2, etc.


EDITED 1 Thanks for your help. In fact my code is a little bit more complicated than what I posted above. Here is the complete code:

List<object> results=new List<object>();
switch (flag)
{
    case 1:
    var query = from w in db.RADIATION
    where w.DATEDT.CompareTo(dateStr) == 0
    && w.LATITUDE.CompareTo(latitude) == 0
    && w.LONGITUDE.CompareTo(longitude) == 0
    orderby w.TIMETM
    select new { w.RADIATION, w.TIMETM };
    break;
    case 2:
    var query = from w in db.TEMPRETURE
    where w.DATEDT.CompareTo(dateStr) == 0
    && w.LATITUDE.CompareTo(latitude) == 0
    && w.LONGITUDE.CompareTo(longitude) == 0
    orderby w.TIMETM
    select new { w.TEMPRETURE, w.TIMETM };
    foreach (var item in query)
    {
        var resultItem = new { TEMPRETURE = item.TEMPRETURE, TIME = item.TIMETM };
        results.Add(resultItem);
    }
    break;
    case default:
    break;
}

The two queries are for two different tables. So I don't know how to determine the Type T in IQueryable. Also, what I select is an anonymous object using new { PropertyName = propertyValue }. Is there anyway if I insist using the same name query?

share|improve this question
    
You have to define the type then declare it before the switch. –  Pierre-Luc Pineault Jul 2 '13 at 2:32
    
Do you want to use query later on after switch? –  tia Jul 2 '13 at 2:47
    
@tia No, I don't. I know it's seems a little unreasonable but I just want to use the same name query because they are all queries for tables. –  AmareKnight Jul 2 '13 at 3:02
    
why didn't you define a class as your query result? such as: List<MyClass> results=new List<MyClass>(); then select new MyClass{} –  Tim.Tang Jul 2 '13 at 3:06
    
@AmareKnight see my answer then. –  tia Jul 2 '13 at 4:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The var keyword is irrelevant. You can do it like this:

switch(flag)
{
    case 1: {
              var query=from w in db.someTable
                    select w;
          }
          break;
    case 2: {
              var query=from w in db.someTable
                    where w.id==someID
                    select w;
          }
          break;
    default:
          break;
}

It is correct syntax, but I would suggest you to extract each case to each method instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Cool, just curly braces. Thank you! –  AmareKnight Jul 2 '13 at 5:46

Declaring with var lets you shorten the code, but the variable that you declare remains statically typed, and the scope of that variable does not change.

If you need to use a variable outside switch, declare it before the switch statement, like this:

IQueryable<SomeType> query = null;
switch (...) {
    case 1: query = ...; break;
    ...
    default: ...
}

Now you can use query outside the switch.

Note: There are cases where you must use var because the type that you assign to it has no name, but in your first case the type has a name, so you do not need to use var.

EDIT : Your second case, however, does require a var, because you are selecting an anonymous type. In situations like that there are several ways around this problem:

  • You can declare a named type for the "superset" of columns that you select (i.e. TIMETM, TEMPERATURE, and RADIATION), or
  • In .NET 4.0 you can use IQueryable<dynamic>. This shifts some of compile-time checking into runtime, but if you have to go this route, it is very convenient.
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your help. I've edited my question, please give it a read. –  AmareKnight Jul 2 '13 at 2:57
    
If I understard right, the query projection is different based on the switch? You can't do that. var is still compiled to one type, it's just syntactic sugar provided by the compiler when the Type of the variable can be inferred (that's why var = null can't be done since it applies to any object). Your first and second switch select two different anonymous object, hence two different object types. You can't assign both to one variable. –  Simon Belanger Jul 2 '13 at 3:01
    
Thx! Now I understand the var a lot better. I'll try the dynamic method later. –  AmareKnight Jul 2 '13 at 3:23

if it is same table , you can try this:

var query=from w in db.someTable select w;
switch(flag)
{
    case 1: 
          break;
    case 2:
          query=query.Where(w.id==someID); 
          break;
    default:
          query=null; //since linq is Delay query, if you don't use the data in query, it will do nothing.
          break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Jason Because of deferred execution the behavior will appear the same, but the code does not convey that as neatly as the OP's code does. –  dasblinkenlight Jul 2 '13 at 2:36
    
set query=null when case default. :D –  Tim.Tang Jul 2 '13 at 2:38
1  
@Tim.Tang If you do, you can't use var anymore. It would be the same as @dasblinkenlight answer –  Simon Belanger Jul 2 '13 at 2:51
    
why didn't define a class as your query result? such as: List<MyClass> results=new List<MyClass>(); then results =..... select new MyClass{} ; –  Tim.Tang Jul 2 '13 at 3:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.