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i have just started working in MVC and I have one doubt.

Instead of Nonaction method , we can create private method in controller or we can also write method in model and call that from controller.

So , what is the real purpose to use public NonAction method in MVC ?

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Not sure what you are looking for - if you have method that needs to be public for some reasons but should not be an action you just mark it that way... Or your question is "why people use public methods"? –  Alexei Levenkov Jul 2 '13 at 5:41
    
@AlexeiLevenkov : Yes my question is why people use public nonaction method. they can even use private method. –  ChandniShah Jul 2 '13 at 5:44
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

(I restructured the answer to better address the questions in the comments)

I think, the attribute is here only for better flexibility. As a framework designer, one wants to relax coding constraints off the end user as much as possible. Requirement of not having public non-actions may sound good "in general" but may be too restrictive for some projects. Adding [NonAction] solves their problem (introduced by their bad design though) - and obviously you're not forced to use the attribute, so it's a win-win from a framework designer perspective.

Another reason may be legacy - in the earlier MVC versions only methods marked with [Action] where considered as actions. So when they relaxed the requirement (and all public methods became treated as actions) they kept [NonAction] so that developers won't get too confused.


In general, using NonAction is a bad practice - exactly for the reasons you stated. If something shouldn't be an action, it should not be public in the first place.

Problem with public non-action methods on the controller is that they make people tempted to instantiate your controller and call the method, instead of separating out the common logic:

Compare

public class MyController : IController
{
    public ActionResult Foo(long orderId)
    {
        var order = new OrdersController().GetOrder(orderId); //GetOrder is public
        ...
    }
}

with

public class MyController : IController
{
    public ActionResult Foo(long orderId)
    {
        var order = _orderService.GetOrder(orderId);
        ...
    }
}

The first approach leads to increased coupling between controllers and non-straightforward code in the actions. Code becomes difficult to follow and refactor, and cumbersome to mock/test.

Besides increased coupling, any public non-action method is a security hole - if you forget to mark it with [NonAction] (or, better, change away from public) - because it's treated as normal action and can be invoked externally. I know the original question kinda implies you surely would never forget to attach the attribute if needed, but it's also kinda important to understand what can happen if you would ;) Oh well, and as we're on this, it seems to me that "forgetting the attribute" is more theoretically probable, comparing to "forgetting to make the method private".


Sometimes people say having public non-actions is necessary for unit testing, but again, when something is not an action it most likely can be isolated in a separate class and tested separately. Moreover, even if it's not feasible for whatever reason, marking a method public for testing purposes only is a bad habit - using internal and InternalsVisibleTo is the recommended way.

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Good for recommending it private instead of Non Action Method as it can be used in intermediate operation of Action Methods like function calling. Now, they cannot be called outside that controller. So far very good. Question - Why should i use Non-Action Method ? Can you please tell the significance of it's usage ? –  PKKG Jul 3 '13 at 11:32
    
"Why should I use [NonAction]" - You don't have to use it. My take is that the attribute exists because the folks who created ASP.NET MVC wanted to make the framework available for poorly designed projects, too. –  andreister Jul 3 '13 at 11:49
    
ok Thanks. But what are those bad habits included while using Non Action method ? –  PKKG Jul 3 '13 at 12:17
    
Are you asking, why it's bad to have public non-action methods on the controller? First off, it makes others tempted to instantiate your controller and call the method (instead of separating out the common logic), which leads to increased coupling between controllers and non-straightforward code in the actions. Code becomes difficult to follow and cumbersome to mock/test. Besides that, any public non-action method is a security hole - if you forget to mark it with NonAction (or, better, change away from public) - because it's treated as normal action and can be invoked externally. –  andreister Jul 3 '13 at 12:30
1  
Your answer made me clean up my controller and I now have an external service class for two previously public controller methods. Looks like [NonAction] in this case would have just helped me keep my architecture dirty. Good I didn't need to use it, really. –  Oliver Nov 9 '13 at 11:38
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This kind of situation may be caused by requirements some testing framework such as you need to do unit testing on that method then you to expose it although its a bad design but can't change these had to bear it out.

By default, the MVC framework treats all public methods of a controller class as action methods. If your controller class contains a public method and you do not want it to be an action method, you must mark that method with the NonActionAttributeattribute.

Real purpose to use public NonAction

To restrict access to non-action method to notify MVC framework that given controller method is not action.

When you try to run a method with NonAction attribute over URL you get the error 404 as response to request.

Ref: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd410269%28v=vs.90%29.aspx

For Detail: http://weblogs.asp.net/gunnarpeipman/archive/2011/04/09/asp-net-mvc-using-nonactionattribute-to-restrict-access-to-public-methods-of-controller.aspx

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1  
I know how to use NonActionAttribute. My real question is what is a real reason to use Nonaction method. –  ChandniShah Jul 2 '13 at 5:39
    
@ChandniShah, When you try to run a method with NonAction attribute over URL you get the error 404 as response to request. –  Satpal Jul 2 '13 at 5:41
    
But in place of public non action method , I can use private method also . in that case also I will get error. so why I need to use puble non action method ? –  ChandniShah Jul 2 '13 at 5:42
    
@ChandniShah, At times we may need public methods on controllers for some reasons. –  Satpal Jul 2 '13 at 5:45
5  
I want to know that 'Some resons' only. –  ChandniShah Jul 2 '13 at 5:50
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This is beneficial when the Url are not case sensitive. So that for example if you have the request Home/About this goes to HomeController and About action, as well as hOmE/AbOUT is going to the same controller and same action method.

Like below

public class HomeController:Controller
{
....
    public ViewResult About()
    {
        return View();
    }

    public ViewResult aBOut()
    {
        return View();
    }
}

The framework can’t determine which about function to call, and throws the exception telling that the call is ambiguous.

enter image description here

Of course one way to fix this problem is to change the action name.

If for some reason you don’t want to change the action name, and one of these function is not an action, then you can decorate this non action method with NonAction attribute. Example:

[NonAction]
public ActionResult aBOut()
{
   return View();
}
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By default, the MVC framework treats all public methods of a controller class as action methods. If your controller class contains a public method and you do not want it to be an action method, you must mark that method with the NonActionAttribute attribute.

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So, What's the advantage of using Non Action in Controller ? –  PKKG Jul 27 '13 at 16:18
    
You can use non action methods for long-running, non-CPU bound requests. This avoids blocking the Web server from performing work while the request is being processed. –  Duk Jul 30 '13 at 6:21
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We are using controllers as binding drivers with custom ASP pipeline, each driver is responsible for rendering one section (partial view) of result page. Then we are using public methods like:

[NonAction]
publi int GetOrder() 

to resolve sections order on page or other to resolve authorization for current user (e.g. if current section is editable or just read-only).

So you should not restrain yourself to think about Controller as only a way to handle requests but also as a tool to build your custom framework for rendering page. That way we keep our Controllers responsible for exactly one task and we are separating domain concerns.

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ASP.NET is highly customizable. Assume you are going to change the default behavior of the framework by overriding the MVC HTTP handler. Maybe you want to customize the logging logic depending on the controller, which is used. Some controllers implement your ILoggingController interface with the method IControllerLogger GetLogger(). For this method you need to write a public non-action method.

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