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#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
FILE  *fp;
fp = fopen("test22.txt","r");
while(fgetc(fp)!=EOF)
printf("%c",*(fp->_ptr));
return 0;
}

I am using Code::Blocks. I know that the '_ptr' member points to the next character in the buffer. The file's contains the text 'Hello World!'. How do I modify my program to print the first character too, using just the members of FILE structure?

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1  
The program above prints 'ello World!' –  amulous Jul 2 '13 at 5:42

4 Answers 4

#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    FILE  *fp;
    fp = fopen("test22.txt","r");
    if(fp == NULL){
        printf("File did not opened.\n");
        return -1;
    do{
        printf("%c",*(fp->_ptr));
    } while(fgetc(fp)!=EOF);
    fclose(fp);
    return 0;
}
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It doesn't work. Any attempt to print *(fp->_ptr) before making a call to fgetc() or any other similar function makes the program terminate abnormally. –  amulous Jul 2 '13 at 6:08
    
then you have to store to a char variable the first call of fgetc in order to print it because fp->ptr after fgetc is at the 2nd character. –  V_Maenolis Jul 2 '13 at 8:01

Using the members of the FILE type is extremely risky and non-portable. While _ptr may point to the currently cached portion of the stream, there is absolutely no guarantee that _ptr[0] will always point at the first character in the file. See here where it states:

The content of a FILE object is not meant to be accessed from outside the functions of the and headers; In fact, portable programs shall only use them in the form of pointers to identify streams, since for some implementations, even the value of the pointer itself could be significant to identify the stream (i.e., the pointer to a copy of a FILE object could be interpreted differently than a pointer to the original).

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I know. I was just trying. _ptr points to the next char in the buffer. How does one get the current character? –  amulous Jul 2 '13 at 7:06
    
By tricking the compiler: char curr = FILE->_ptr[-1]; –  levengli Jul 2 '13 at 10:57

fgetc advances the buffer to the next character. You can save/print the first letter before the fgetc call, use a do-while, call rewind, etc.

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One possible solution is to take advantage of the "return reference on assignment", which means that, after such operation, it is returned a reference to its result, which can be then used, for example, to compare to the EOF.

Using your code:

#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    FILE  *fp;
    fp = fopen("text22.txt","r");
    char buffer;
    while((buffer=fgetc(fp))!=EOF)
        printf("%c",buf);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
fgetc returns an int and EOF is defined as -1. Depending on your compilers implementation of char this might not work. –  Tom Tanner Jul 2 '13 at 9:14

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