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I have a function inside one of my angular services that I'd like to be called repeatedly at a regular interval. I'd like to do this using $timeout. It looks something like this:

var interval = 1000; // Or something

var _tick = function () {
     $timeout(function () {
        doStuff();
        _tick();
    }, interval);
};

_tick();

I'm stumped on how to unit test this with Jasmine at the moment - How do I do this? If I use $timeout.flush() then the function calls occur indefinitely. If I use Jasmine's mock clock, $timeout seems to be unaffected. Basically if I can get this working, I should be good to go:

describe("ANGULAR Manually ticking the Jasmine Mock Clock", function() {
    var timerCallback, $timeout;

    beforeEach(inject(function($injector) {
        $timeout = $injector.get('$timeout');
        timerCallback = jasmine.createSpy('timerCallback');
        jasmine.Clock.useMock();
    }));

    it("causes a timeout to be called synchronously", function() {
        $timeout(function() {
            timerCallback();
        }, 100);
        expect(timerCallback).not.toHaveBeenCalled();
        jasmine.Clock.tick(101);
        expect(timerCallback).toHaveBeenCalled();
    });
});

These two variations work, but do not help me:

describe("Manually ticking the Jasmine Mock Clock", function() {
    var timerCallback;

    beforeEach(function() {
        timerCallback = jasmine.createSpy('timerCallback');
        jasmine.Clock.useMock();
    });

    it("causes a timeout to be called synchronously", function() {
        setTimeout(function() {
            timerCallback();
        }, 100);
        expect(timerCallback).not.toHaveBeenCalled();
        jasmine.Clock.tick(101);
        expect(timerCallback).toHaveBeenCalled();
    });
});

describe("ANGULAR Manually flushing $timeout", function() {
    var timerCallback, $timeout;

    beforeEach(inject(function($injector) {
        $timeout = $injector.get('$timeout');
        timerCallback = jasmine.createSpy('timerCallback');
    }));

    it("causes a timeout to be called synchronously", function() {
        $timeout(function() {
            timerCallback();
        }, 100);
        expect(timerCallback).not.toHaveBeenCalled();
        $timeout.flush();
        expect(timerCallback).toHaveBeenCalled();
    });
});

Thanks in advance!

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Try injecting $rootScope and calling $rootScope.$apply() after pushing the clock forward. –  Hector Virgen Aug 12 '13 at 19:17
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1 Answer

Do not make your test Async by using Jasmine's clock. Instead, use $timeout.flush() to synchronously maintain the flow of the test. It may be a bit tricky to setup, but once you get it then your tests will be faster and more controlled.

Here's an example of a test that does it using this approach: https://github.com/angular/angular.js/blob/master/test/ngAnimate/animateSpec.js#L618

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